Vinnie Duber

White Sox 2005 Rewind: Winning ugly

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AP

White Sox 2005 Rewind: Winning ugly

Good teams make up for their own mistakes.

Bad day for a pitcher? The offense picks him up. Slumping superstar? The role players get the job done.

That sort of thing happens over the entirety of a season, but if you’re looking for a microcosm from the White Sox championship campaign in 2005, look no further than May 8.

The White Sox completed a sweep of the Blue Jays on Mother’s Day in a game that featured a disastrous fourth inning that saw two uncustomary errors by Juan Uribe and an uncustomary rough go for Mark Buehrle.

Early on, Uribe looked like he was going to lead a beatdown of the Blue Jays. Batting high up in Ozzie Guillen’s order with Tadahito Iguchi getting a day off, Uribe made his skipper look smart by smashing a solo home run in the first inning.


In each of the first three innings, he made stellar defensive plays, almost turning a triple play in the first and turning a second double play in the third.

By the time Buehrle went out for the bottom of the fourth, he had a 5-0 lead to work with. But after a quick first out, he gave up back-to-back singles and a walk to load the bases with one out. That’s when Uribe’s misfortune started. He dropped a ground ball, allowing a run to come home. And two batters later, after another run had scored, he airmailed a throw to first base in an attempt to complete an inning-ending double play. Two runs scored on that play, including one on his second error of the frame.

Buehrle did his job a couple times with the bases loaded, generating the kind of ground balls he used to get outs throughout his career. Without the help from his defense, though, the three hits and one walk he did give up in the inning ballooned into four runs, obviously helped by Uribe’s errors.

But despite that bout of ugliness in the fourth inning, the White Sox kept it together — and got contributions from the rest of the roster to make up for it.

Jermaine Dye hit a two-run homer. Joe Crede drove in a run, as did Pedro Lopez, who played in just two games for the 2005 White Sox. Buehrle navigated around some more trouble, retiring eight of the last 12 batters he faced — including getting a huge double play to get out a jam with the tying run 90 feet away in the fifth and another double play in the sixth. Dustin Hermanson sat down the only three hitters he faced, and despite a shaky ninth inning from Damaso Marte, Aaron Rowand made a game-saving catch on a line drive with the winning run at second base for the final out.

Borrow a term from an even older White Sox team: winning ugly.

Victories don’t have to be pretty, as long as they’re victories. And whether that’s staging a comeback win without the benefit of a hit or holding off a self-inflicted charge, the 2005 White Sox did it.

What else?

— Frank Menechino batted second for the Blue Jays in this one. He’s currently the White Sox hitting coach, and Toronto was one of two stops during his major league career. After spending five and a half big league seasons with the A’s, he was dealt in the middle of the 2004 season and spent his final major league campaign with the Jays in 2005. He had only a .216 batting average in his 70 games that year but reached base at a strong .352 clip. He had a hit and a walk in this one against Buehrle.

— Pedro Lopez again! This guy played in a grand total of two games for the 2005 White Sox. And he got an RBI hit in both of them. He had an RBI single as part of an 8-0 win over the Tigers on May 1. A week later, he got the start at second base, spelling Iguchi, and delivered an RBI hit that drove in the White Sox fifth run, eventually the difference-maker when the Blue Jays scored four off Buehrle in the bottom of the fourth. “Team of destiny,” anyone?

— This was Buehrle’s first win against the Blue Jays in his career, the only American League he hadn’t beaten coming into this start.

Since you been gone

While #SoxRewind is extensive, it doesn’t include all 162 regular-season contests, meaning we’re going to be skipping over some games. So what’d we miss since last time?

May 6, 2005: Down 3-2 heading into the seventh, Dye tied the game with a solo homer to leadoff that inning. The White Sox grabbed the lead in the eighth on a two-out, two-run single by A.J. Pierzynski. White Sox win, 5-3, improve to 22-7.

May 7, 2005: The White Sox hit five homers, including two by Paul Konerko, scoring 10 runs in the first four innings to make up plenty for Jon Garland surrendering six runs to Blue Jays bats. White Sox win, 10-7, improve to 23-7.

Next up

#SoxRewind rolls on Sunday, when you can catch the May 11, 2005, game against the Devil Rays, starting at 4 p.m. on NBC Sports Chicago. Konerko drove in a pair with a double in a four-run fourth, and Orlando Hernandez allowed just three hits in a solid outing.

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The White Sox most recent trade with every MLB team

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USA TODAY

The White Sox most recent trade with every MLB team

Baseball teams make an awful lot of trades, and the White Sox are no exception.

The biggest deals of the last few years are easy to remember: the Chris Sale trade with the Red Sox, the Adam Eaton trade with the Nationals, the Jose Quintana trade with the Cubs.

But quick, what was the White Sox most recent trade with the Braves? Or the Angels? Or the Mets?

For a trivia-packed walk down memory lane, check out this list of the White Sox most recent trade with every other one of the 29 major league clubs. Some even predate Rick Hahn's time as general manager.

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Eloy Jiménez joins Mayor Lightfoot in campaign to slow COVID-19 spread

Eloy Jiménez joins Mayor Lightfoot in campaign to slow COVID-19 spread

Eloy Jiménez has some good advice for Chicagoans as the city attempts to manage the spread of COVID-19.

Jiménez filmed a video clip that the White Sox tweeted out Monday morning as part of Mayor Lori Lightfoot's campaign to convince Chicago residents to practice social distancing and stay in their homes.

"We are not playing right now. You shouldn't be either," the White Sox left fielder said in the video. "Be a hero. Stay at home. Do your part to slow the spread of COVID-19. Stay at home and save lives.

"Go Sox."

And of course, it wouldn't be a Jiménez appearance without a exuberant "HI MOM!"

The mayor's campaign, titled "We Are Not Playing," involves many other Chicago pro athletes who are reminding folks that there's a good reason sports are shut down right now and that everyone else should follow suit.

"We all have a role to play in meeting the challenge of COVID-19, and our success is directly tied to every Chicagoan making sure they stay home and save lives," Mayor Lightfoot said in her announcement of the campaign. "I am grateful to each of our hometown teams for stepping up and doing their part by joining in this call for every neighborhood and community.

"They’re not playing, and neither are we. The more we stay home and act responsibly, the more lives we’ll save, and the sooner we’ll be able to get our city back on track and enjoying the games we love."

RELATED: Anderson wants South Side to 'stay prepared' for Sox return

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