Bears

Bears could target linebackers in draft

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Bears could target linebackers in draft

Bears draft trail of breadcrumbs leads to

General manager Phil Emery has been firm and consistent about maintaining a cloak of secrecy and cone of silence over Bears draft intentions. But in theater, action is character and in the NFL, action is revealing.

The signing of former San Francisco 49ers guard Chilo Rachal, the latest in an offseason replete with additions on offense (Michael Bush, Brandon Marshall, Devin Thomas, Eric Weems), is a small trail of breadcrumbs leading in the general direction of a first draft strike on the other side of the ball.

But not just anywhere on defense.

Cornerback was addressed with the signings of Kelvin Hayden and Jonathan Wilhite. Safety was attended to with third-rounders in the last two drafts (Chris Conte, Major Wright) and that too is not a first-round need.

Emery is looking hard at veteran additions at linebacker in the days remaining before next Thursdays draft opening. ESPNChicago.com chronicled a Halas Hall visit by Washington Redskins veteran Rocky McIntosh, a player on the Bears radar for the past couple of years.

Also getting looks have been Zac Diles from the Houston Texans and Bryan Kehl from the St. Louis Rams, according to various reports.

The implication: Emery and the Bears see value in free agency and potential depth behind Lance Briggs, Nick Roach and Brian Urlacher. Sports Illustrateds Peter King also reported that the Bears brought in Alabama linebacker Donta Hightower

D-end games

But where the guest list for linebacker has been heavier with veterans, an equally strong parallel effort has been happening at defensive end with an eye toward the draft.

The Bears have done extensive checking out of Illinois Whitney Mercilus, whom more than one mock draft projects to be falling to the Bears at No. 19. South Carolinas Melvin Ingram was a visitor at Halas Hall this week, according to sources. And Syracuse edge rusher Chandler Jones was a previous interviewee for the Bears.

Ingram is not expected to last until the Bears turn comes, with a resume including 19 sacks over the past two years. Jones, whom ESPN draft analyst Mel Kiper rates behind only North Carolinas Quinton Coples and Ingram among ends, and Mercilus are juniors.

That makes for some difficulties in evaluations. Jones had 4.5 sacks in 2011 but missed five games with a knee injury. Mercilus had 16 sacks last season but only one in each of the previous two and if you go back to August, Mercilus wasnt even one of Illinois top five defensive linemen, Kiper said.

The juniors come out with a limited body of work, but sometimes that helps them because you cant shoot as many holes in them or find red flags. The guys that stay a long time, you find something that bothers you and youre picking them apart.

Fault-finding is traditionally the sport of choice in draft rooms over the last week before the draft. The Bears will be doing that with an eye toward having their preferences decided as their turn approaches next Thursday evening.

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

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Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

As the Bears set their foundation for training camp during OTAs this month, one part of that is beginning to identify each player’s strengths and weaknesses on which to build in Bourbonnais. 

Designing an offense to Mitch Trubisky’s strengths was one of the reasons why Ryan Pace hired Matt Nagy, who then hired Mark Helfrich to be his offensive coordinator. Easy is the wrong word — but it wouldn’t have made sense for the Bears to not build an offense around their second-picked quarterback. 

But as Nagy and Helfrich are installing that offense during OTAs and, next month, veteran minicamp, they’re also learning what Trubisky’s weaknesses are. And the one Helfrich pointed to, in a way, is a positive. 

“Experience,” Helfrich said. “I think it’s 100 percent experience and just reps, and that’s kind of what I was talking about was knowing why something happened. As a quarterback, he might take the perfect drop and be looking at the right guy in your progression, and that guy runs the wrong route or the left guard busts or something. The defense does something different or wrong, even. And trusting that is just a matter of putting rep on top of rep on top of rep and being confident.”

It'd be a concern if the Bears thought Trubisky lacked the necessary talent to be great, or had a lacking work ethic or bad attitude. Experience isn't something he can control, in a way. 

This isn’t anything new for Trubisky. His lack of experience at North Carolina — he only started 13 games there — was the biggest ding to his draft stock a year ago; while he started a dozen games for the Bears in 2017, the offense was simple and conservative, designed to minimize risk for Trubisky (and, to be fair, a sub-optimal group of weapons around him). 

But even if Trubisky started all 16 games in an innovative, aggressive offense last year, he’d still be experiencing plenty of things for the first time. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger made this point back in September that still resonates now with regard to Trubisky:

“I think it takes a few years until you can really get that title of understanding being great or even good, because you see so many looks,” Roethlisberger said. “In Year 2 and 3, you’re still seeing looks and can act like a rookie.”

So the challenge for Nagy and Helfrich is to build an offense that accentuates Trubisky’s strengths while managing his lack of experience. For what it’s worth, the Los Angeles Rams and Philadelphia Eagles succeeded in those efforts last year with Jared Goff and Carson Wentz, respectively. 

For Helfrich, though, one of Trubisky’s strengths — his leadership qualities — are already helping mitigate his need for more experience. 

“He’s still in the mode of learning and doing things out here,” Helfrich said. “We might have run one play 10 times against 10 different defenses, you know? And so his response to every one of those 10 things is brand new. And so, you see his reaction to some of those is good. Some of those things you want to improve upon and then keep your chest up and lead because we need that.”
 

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

For over two years, Charlie Tilson was starting to look like his own version of "Moonlight" Graham, the player made famous in the movie "Field of Dreams" because he played in one major league game and never got to bat.

The White Sox traded for Tilson just before the trade deadline passed in 2016. Two days later he made his big league debut with the White Sox in Detroit. He got a single in his first at-bat, but left the game with an injury and missed the rest of the season. Tilson also missed all of the 2017 season and his MLB future was starting to come into question.

Back healthy, Tilson started this season in Triple-A Charlotte and hit .248 in 39 games when he got called up to replace Leury Garcia, who was placed on the disabled list. On Thursday, Tilson returned to a big league field for the first time in more than 20 months. He went 0-for-3 in a loss to Baltimore.

Friday marked a return to the site of Tilson's big league debut and the injury that made it such a brief stint. Tilson has now played three big league games, over the course of nearly 21 months, and two of them have been in Detroit.

Tilson went 1-for-4, meaning both his hits are in Comerica Park. The White Sox lost 5-4 after giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth.