Bears

Bears grades: Which units escape an 'F' after blowout loss in Philadelphia?

Bears grades: Which units escape an 'F' after blowout loss in Philadelphia?

QUARTERBACKS: F

Mitchell Trubisky completed 17 of 33 passes (51.5 percent), with some significant accuracy issues contributing to that poor completion percentage. He threw two interceptions and fumbled twice (though none of those fumbles were lost), and his 38.3 rating was a career low. “I didn’t play the game I set out to play or the game I’m capable of,” Trubisky said. The Bears averaged 2.9 yards per play, gained 140 total yards and had eight first downs on Sunday. And while the Eagles clearly have the better team, there’s not a curve for a last-place team facing a first-place team. 

RUNNING BACKS: F

The Eagles have one of the very best run defenses in the NFL, and Jordan Howard (seven carries, six yards), Tarik Cohen (two carries, -11 yards) and Benny Cunningham (one carry, minus-one yard) combined for 10 carries for minus-six yards, good for an average loss (not gain) of 0.6 yards per carry. On the bright side, Howard and Cohen each had two catches on two targets, but there was no way the Bears’ offense was going to have any success with its running backs averaging a loss every time they carried the ball. 

WIDE RECEIVERS: F

Dontrelle Inman caught four of his nine targets for 64 yards but had a couple of drops, while Tre McBride and Kendall Wright combined for four catches and 35 yards on 11 targets. Some of this had to do with Trubisky’s accuracy issues, but his receivers weren’t doing enough to make his Sunday easier. 

TIGHT ENDS: F

Adam Shaheen missed a run block early and only played 17 of the Bears’ 55 snaps, and caught his one target for one yard. Dion Sims returned from an illness and played 20 snaps, so it’s not like Sims was taking snaps away from Shaheen. Daniel Brown, though, played 30 snaps, which was more of a function of the Bears having to run their two-minute offense for most of the game. 

OFFENSIVE LINE: F

This group did do a halfway decent job protecting Trubisky (two sacks, five hurries) against an Eagles defense that was able to pin its ears back and do quite a bit of pass rushing against a Bears offense that had to pass quite a bit. But the six rushing yards the Bears managed are the second-lowest total in franchise history, and there’s no getting around that. 

DEFENSIVE LINE: D+

Akiem Hicks (two TFLs) and Eddie Goldman (four tackles, one hurry) both were solid at times, while Jonathan Bullard had his most disruptive game of the season (one sack, two hurries, one TFL). A depleted and ineffective linebacker corps was the bigger culprit for Philadelphia’s average of 5.3 yards per carry, but this unit didn’t have enough big, game-changing plays to prop up the rest of the defense. Worth noting: Hicks played 69.2 percent of the Bears' defensive snaps, with his only lower percentaged (69 percent) coming in that Week 2 blowout loss at Tampa. Hicks has been a workhorse on the defensive line this season, but given he was limited in practice last week, perhaps the Bears will manage his snaps a little more now that they won't be playing meaningful games in December. 

LINEBACKERS: D-

Pernell McPhee was largely invisible, only recording two sacks with no hurries, though Sam Acho had a solid game with four tackles and two hurries. Christian Jones had one pass break-up and five tackles, and Nick Kwiatkoski only had one tackle while playing 62.8 percent of the Bears’ snaps. Isaiah Irving recorded one tackle with no hurries or sacks in his first extended un in the Bears’ defense. This unit sorely missed Danny Trevathan and Leonard Floyd, to say the least. 

DEFENSIVE BACKS: D

There was a lot of bad from this group, with Eddie Jackson struggling against the pass and run and dropping an interception in the second half. Adrian Amos allowed Zach Ertz to burst free for a 17-yard touchdown in the first quarter, Philadelphia’s first of the game. Prince Amukamara committed two penalties, and Kyle Fuller had an uneven game, with the lowlight him falling down on a first down conversion to Alshon Jeffery in the first quarter. But give this group credit for Amukamara and Cre’Von LeBlanc both forcing fumbles (Amukamara was officially credited with it, though Amos, no pun intended, had a hand in it as well), while that pair each had two pass break-ups as well. And overall for the defense, no unit gets an "F" here because there were players from each unit (Goldman, Acho, LeBlanc in particular) who had decent games. It's harder to identify those guys on offense. 

SPECIAL TEAMS: F

Pat O’Donnell had some uncharacteristic struggles, with his first punt going only 34 yards to the Bears’ 44, which preceded the Eagles’ first touchdown of the game (he did rebound to have his next punt stick Philadelphia inside its own 10-yard line, and had a 58-yarder later in the game). Cairo Santos was put in a tough situation on his 54-yard field goal — his first field goal attempt since Week 3 and his subsequent groin injury — but did connect on a 38-yard field goal that ensured the Bears wouldn’t get shut out. Both Marcus Cooper and Jonathan Anderson were flagged for penalties on returns that led to the Bears starting first-half drives inside their own 10-yard line. 

COACHING: F

We’ll start here: About five and a half minutes into the second quarter, the Bears mistakenly began to send their punt team into the field on third down, then had to call timeout because only 10 men were on the field. Having Santos attempt that 54-yard field goal on fourth and four was a questionable decision — why not let Trubisky have a crack at converting a first down? The Bears were woefully undisciplined, and ended the first half with more penalty yards (36) than offensive yards (34). That the Eagles were actually the more heavily penalized team (11 for 70 yards for Philadelphia, nine for 56 for the Bears) doesn’t absolve this group, and in fact makes it look worse that the Bears managed to lose by four touchdowns against a talented, yet sloppy, opponent.

Eddy Pineiro's mental edge is exactly what the Bears need

Eddy Pineiro's mental edge is exactly what the Bears need

Back when the Bears traded for Eddy Pineiro on May 6 — following that nine-kicker rookie minicamp circus — his old kicking coach offered some analysis that now looks particularly prescient.

“He. Is. The. Man,” kicking coach Brandon Kornblue texted NBC Sports Chicago. “He has the mental edge. Not afraid of anything.

“I think he is perfect for this situation.”

Four months later, Pineiro drilled a game-winning 53-yard field goal against the Denver Broncos. He won the team’s kicking competition, then won a game. This is the outcome the Bears hoped they’d realize though all the 43-yard tries and Augusta silences and dealer’s choices in the spring and summer. 

But beyond just making the kick, what stood out is how badly Pineiro wanted the ball on his foot to end the game. 

“I was praying on the sidelines that I was able to get that moment,” Pineiro said. “I was like please, God, give me this opportunity, I want to get in this spotlight to make this happen for the team.”

Mental edge. Not afraid of anything. Perfect for the situation. 

The stakes of Pineiro’s kick were massive — maybe not as dire as John Fox might’ve thought — given the discouraging track record of teams that begin a season 0-2. The moment was not too big for him, since it was the exact moment he wanted. 

“I knew I was ready for it,” Pineiro said. “From all the things that I’ve been put through, the Augusta silence, the kickers getting cut left and right, I feel like I was ready for it.”

There’s something to be said for a kicker wanting to be in that moment. It’s easy to get the impression that’s the case with Pineiro; it would’ve been a lot harder to come to that conclusion with Cody Parkey a year ago, even before the double-doink. Parkey missed a game-winning field goal in Week 6 against the Miami Dolphins, then hit the upright four times against the Detroit Lions, and even a week before the playoff game booted a PAT off an upright against the Minnesota Vikings. 

The Bears now know they can trust Pineiro in those kind of moments. Because the next time they need a game-winning kick, they’ll know their guy is not just confident he can do it. He wants the opportunity to have the ball on his foot with time expiring, and wants it badly. 

“He definitely craves the pressure,” offensive lineman Kyle Long said. “And that's something that coach Nagy has talked about for a long time, craving pressure and being in those pressure situations. We’ve been there before, now how do we deliver?”

Pineiro delivered. And the Bears can count on him to deliver again. 

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Bears are road favorites in Week 3 vs. Redskins

Bears are road favorites in Week 3 vs. Redskins

For the second week in a row, the Chicago Bears are road favorites heading into Monday night's showdown with the Washington Redskins.

The Bears were a rare road favorite in Denver for the Broncos' home-opener in Week 2, and are a four-point favorite against the Redskins at FedEx Field Monday.

This point spread represents a decent amount of confidence that Chicago will come away with a win Monday night. Home teams normally get a three-point edge by default, so for oddsmakers to like the Bears by four points suggests it should be a game they win by a touchdown or more.

Whether the Bears can pull off a victory is only part of the story in Week 3. It's already the second game Chicago will play in front of a national television audience, and no player needs a breakout performance worse than Mitch Trubisky. He has to change the narrative that's crystallizing around his career, one that suggests he's a game manager who the Bears win in spite of. He needs a breakthrough game that announces his arrival as a franchise quarterback, and there's no better time to do that than on Monday Night Football.

As for the rest of the NFC North, the Packers are eight-point favorites at home against the Broncos, the Lions are seven-point underdogs on the road against the Eagles and the Vikings are 7.5-point favorites at home against the Raiders.

 

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