Bears

For the Bears' tight ends, there remains an adamant belief that a turnaround is coming soon

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USA Today

For the Bears' tight ends, there remains an adamant belief that a turnaround is coming soon

Matt Nagy has never been shy about the role tight ends play in his offense. The evidence is plain to see: Trey Burton is one of the team’s ‘adjusters,’ a label used for the handful of players that the Bears’ offense relies most-heavily on. Drafting Adam Shaheen with the 45th overall pick in the 2017 Draft is another example. 

Complimenting one with the other was supposed to open up the offense, with Burton operating as the “U” and Shaheen playing more of the traditional “Y” role. Instead, through the first quarter of the season, the pair has combined for 18 catches and 107 yards. Neither have found the end zone yet, and the longest reception from either of them has been 11 yards. 

“I wouldn’t say they’re playing poorly,” Bears’ tight end coach Kevin Gillbride said on Tuesday. “... but I don’t think we’re playing great. I think that we do have improvements to make. But again, I do like where their heads are at. They understand exactly where they need to improve, and how it’s going to help our team win.” 

The production needs to improve, but with the additions of Cordarrelle Patterson, Mike Davis, and David Montgomery, there are a few more mouths to feed this season. 

“We’ve added a lot of weapons as well,” he said. “You’ve got to find that groove as an offense as well. I think as an offense we’re still figuring that out. But there are a lot of people to deliver the football to. And that’s never a bad thing, you know.” 

Some of Burton’s issues are still health-related, as he’s working to feel normal again after dealing with groin issues all offseason. Coaches have been pleased in recent weeks with how Burton’s looked in practice, and feel the unit as a whole isn’t far from the production that’s been expected from them. 

“It’s hard to really put into quantitative terms,” he said. “But it might just be the speed with which we’re running our routes, the way that we’re getting in and out of breaks, the way we’re finishing on the backside of a zone scheme. The better footwork and pad level on a front side of a play. There’s a number of different things that have improved.” 

One byproduct from the unit’s lack of production has been gameday opportunities for J.P. Holtz, who has seen his snap count go (modestly) up in each of the last two games. For a group that’s looking for any type of spark, Holtz’s contributions in both the pass and run game haven’t gone unnoticed. His 16-yard reception against the Raiders was a season-high from a Bears’ tight end. 

“Adding JP to that mix has helped,” Gillbride said. “He’s shown up as far as having catches and things of that nature, because of toughness he’s shown in the running game that have now led to open completions. I mean, that’s the reality of it. It really is all interwoven.” 

It’s been an undoubtedly disappointing start to the season, and Gillbride has had to spend time in meetings making sure that his guys know how close to breaking through the group is. They’ve addressed their shortcomings as a whole, and through the last couple weeks have spent time focusing on the little moments that could have, as he said, turned a “two-yard run into a 40-yard run.”

“It’s not as far off as everyone’s making this out to be,” he added. “It’s really not.”  

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Javon Wims pretended to be a fan and discussed Week 14 injury with driver

Javon Wims pretended to be a fan and discussed Week 14 injury with driver

Javon Wims left the Bears' Week 14 victory over the Cowboys in the second quarter with an apparent knee injury.

The severity of the injury was unknown at the time, but fortunately, NFL Network's Ian Rapoport reported Friday that it's "nothing major."

Saturday afternoon, Wims posted a rather comical exchange between himself and a car driver (presumably an Uber driver, though that's not confirmed), wherein he discussed his injury as if he was just another fan. 

"Nah he's not too bad," Wims assured the driver, after the driver said he hoped Wims wasn't seriously hurt. "I think he'll be alright... You know, I was at that game, so I saw him walk off. He walked off pretty gingerly, but it looked like he was okay. 

"That kid got a bright future ahead of him, he got all the intangibles," Wims continued. 

The two shared a laugh when Wims revealed his true identity. Wims' status for next week's matchup with the Packers isn't clear at the moment, but it's nice to see him making lemonade out of lemons for the time being.

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NFL fines Lions, Matt Patricia for violating Injury Report Policy before Week 10 game against Bears

NFL fines Lions, Matt Patricia for violating Injury Report Policy before Week 10 game against Bears

The Lions fought admirably in their Thanksgiving day loss to their Bears — even without starting QB Matthew Stafford, who missed the game with a back injury.

With third-stringer David Blough under center, Detroit hung around all game, but were outdone by a late Mitch Trubisky game-winning drive, falling 24-20.

In the moment, Stafford's absence was a surprising development. Now, according to a report by NFL Network's Tom Pelissero, the Lions organization, head coach Matt Patricia and GM Bob Quinn are all facing fines for not properly updating Stafford's status in advance of the game:

It's insult to injury for a team currently in the basement of the NFC North at 3-8-1. Two victories over the Lions over a span of four weeks helped spark Trubisky and the Bears to the late-season surge they're currently enjoying.

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