Bears

Bears win with 'different' Mitchell Trubiskys as Vikings fade to the playoff brink in MNF loss to Seattle

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USA TODAY

Bears win with 'different' Mitchell Trubiskys as Vikings fade to the playoff brink in MNF loss to Seattle

No matter what your opinion of Mitchell Trubisky – franchise quarterback, ascending young guy who just needs time, just a guy, the Bears flat-out got the wrong guy – Sunday’s 15-6 win over the Los Angeles Rams provided confirmation of that assessment of the No. 2 pick of the 2017 draft:

Trubisky was abysmal in the first half: 9-of-20 passing, 59 yards, 2 INT’s, passer rating 12.5.

He was “ascending” in the second half: 7-of-10 passing, 51 yards, another INT but a TD pass, rating 74.1.

He was sometimes just a guy: “I think I just need to be better all the way around,” he said afterwards.

Whether the Bears got the right guy? Well, Pat Mahomes is third in the NFL with a passer rating of 115.2 for an 11-2 Kansas City team. Deshaun Watson is ninth at 100.9 and had led 9-4 Houston to nine straight wins before Sunday’s home loss to Indianapolis.

But the Bears have won Trubisky’s last four starts, albeit with a bit of help from the defense on Sunday, even if he has dropped down to No. 22 with his 92.1 passer rating. And he is No. 7 in ESPN’s more comprehensive quarterback rating, so if there are issues with what he is or isn’t, those don’t extend to his head coach, who didn’t view Sunday as any kind of “setback” in Trubisky’s development.

“Not when you win,” Matt Nagy said. “He made some plays when we needed to. For him to be able to keep learning, there’s gonna be some bumps in the road. You can’t throw for 350 yards every game. That’s just not gonna happen in this offense in Year 1. That’s not gonna happen.”

Just a little what-if?

These sorts of what-If’s are easy to find, but whimsical just the same:

Would Ryan Pace have stayed put at No. 14 in the 2014 draft, as Phil Emery did – or would the trade-inclined Pace have jumped over the No. 13 Rams and made sure Aaron Donald’s career went through Chicago?

Of course, running back Todd Gurley was waiting in the green room when the Bears’ turn came at No. 7 a year later, and Pace opted for soon-to-be-former-Bear Kevin White.

Fading Vikings

The NFL may have been cringing at a second straight prime-time game in which offense was largely absent and the winners relied on the time-honored 5-yards-and-a-cloud-of-sod.

But the Bears weren’t cringing at all as they watched the Minnesota Vikings lose 21-7 to the Seattle Seahawks for their third loss in the last four, beginning with the Bears last month.

The Bears clinch the NFC North with a win in any of their final three games. The defeat dropped the Vikings to 6-6-1 and into a position where the only way they can beat the Bears for the NFC North title is to sweep their final three while the Bears were losing theirs, including Game 16 in Minneapolis.

The Vikings still stand as the No. 6 playoff seed at the moment, which would make them the wild-card opponent for the Bears (No. 3) as records now sit. Minnesota with six losses and a tie has a teeny edge for that No. 6 spot ahead of seven-time-losers Carolina, Philadelphia and Washington.

But underneath all this were the Seahawks dominating the Vikings in this Monday Night Football game with a throwback 214 rushing yards on 42 attempts, vs. Seattle’s 22 pass plays – this after the Bears ran 35 times for 194 yards, vs. 31 pass plays in mauling a Rams team with an offense touted as one of the hood ornaments for the “modern” NFL.

 

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Allen Robinson explains why winning Ed Block Courage award is so important

Allen Robinson explains why winning Ed Block Courage award is so important

For the second time in his seven-year career, Allen Robinson is an Ed Block Courage Award winner. 

Having previously won the award in 2015, the Bears announced on Wednesday that Robinson was again elected by his teammates as the Bears player who best "displays professionalism, strength, dedication and is a community role model." The Bears' star receiver has been a mainstay in the community since coming to Chicago in 2018, mostly through his Within Reach foundation. 

When talking with reporters on Wednesday, Robinson spoke at length about what it means to him to win the award a second time. 

"It means a lot," he said. "It means a lot because I think any award that you win that’s judged on by your peers, I think that means a lot. At the end of the day, you can do a lot in the community, you can do a lot on the field, but it really goes down to how you impact the people around you, and that’s on an everyday basis, whether that’s performance based, whether that’s motivational, whatever the case may be.

"To be acknowledged from my teammates for my community efforts and also for my efforts on the field, that’s definitely what you work for. You want to be judged by those guys because those are the guys who are putting in the same work as you.”

NFL players respond to Vic Fangio claiming "I don’t see racism at all" in NFL

NFL players respond to Vic Fangio claiming "I don’t see racism at all" in NFL

You can probably expect a Vic Fangio apology sometime this afternoon. 

Fangio finds himself in hot water on Wednesday after the Broncos coach went on a Tuesday afternoon conference call with Denver reporters and made these comments about his perception of racial bias in the NFL: 

I think our problems in the NFL along those lines are minimal. We're a league of meritocracy. You earn what you get, you get what you earn. I don't see racism at all in the NFL, I don't see discrimination in the NFL," Fangio told reporters Tuesday when asked about his experiences in the league over the past four decades. "We all live together, joined as one, for one common goal, and we all intermingle and mix tremendously. If society reflected an NFL team, we'd all be great.

Not long after, Fangio started hearing it from NFL players who were rightfully upset with the coach's assumptions: 

At this rate, the apology might come earlier.