Bears

Did fear of Aaron Rodgers lead Bears to vote down change to onside kick rule?

Did fear of Aaron Rodgers lead Bears to vote down change to onside kick rule?

The Chicago Bears have had the unfortunate reality of playing against Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers twice a year since he became the team's starter in 2008. 

In total, the Bears have faced Rodgers 23 times and have an atrocious 5-18 record against him. Simply put, he's owned Chicago, and the last thing the Bears want is for Rodgers, or any quality quarterback, to be given a chance to keep a comeback alive with the proposed (and voted down) change to the onside kick rule.

In case you missed it, the league voted against allowing teams the option of a 4th-and-15 play instead of the onside kick to keep possession of the ball. The proposal failed by a ridiculously close 16-16 vote, and the Bears were one of the teams that voted against it, according to NFL.com's Mike Garafolo.

Garafolo shared some insight as to why the Bears voted it down, even if it was tongue-in-cheek.

"One team said in jest, 'if you have a future Hall of Fame quarterback on your roster, you should be excluded from the conversation.' I'm told the team that joked about it was the Chicago Bears," Garofolo said. "So they were referencing Rodgers. How about that one?"

Unfortunately, the Bears haven't had the benefit of fielding a future Hall of Fame quarterback...ever. And in a season where the team doesn't know who their starter will be, it's no surprise they treated this rule as a competitive disadvantage.

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Under Center Podcast: Rotoworld's Josh Norris on Ryan Pace's 2020 draft

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USA Today

Under Center Podcast: Rotoworld's Josh Norris on Ryan Pace's 2020 draft

JJ Stankevitz is joined by draft expert Josh Norris of NBC Sports and Rotoworld, as they take a deep dive into the Bears' 2020 NFL draft class featuring Cole Kmet and Jaylon Johnson. They also dive into the Bears' offseason moves and can the newly acquired players from the draft and free agency make an instant impact for the 2020 season.


(1:23) - Overall impression of what the Bears accomplished in the 2020 draft


(5:00) - Cole Kmet vs Adam Shaheen


(9:37) - Was Jaylon Johnson a 1st round talent


(15:00) - Ryan Pace's 5th round selections


(21:10) - Biggest issues with the Bears draft

Click to download the MyTeams App for the latest Bears news and analysis.

 

NFL reveals football helmet mouth shields to prevent COVID-19 spread

NFL reveals football helmet mouth shields to prevent COVID-19 spread

The majority of the football world got its first glimpse of a new mouth shield developed by Oakley on Monday. The shield was designed to help protect players from the COVID-19 pandemic while they’re on the field.

According to ESPN, there is currently no mandate for players to wear the protective shield, however the NFL’s medical experts are advocating its use.

Click to download the MyTeams App for the latest Bears news and analysis.

The shields have already been distributed to the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers for feedback, according to the ESPN report. That report mentions the two biggest concerns about the shields so far are visibility and breathability.

Most importantly, the NFL's engineering committee Dr. Jeff Crandall told ESPN that the shields prevent direct transmission of droplets from players’ mouths.

Per the report, Oakley tested the shields by spraying fluid particles to mimic droplets expelled by players.

"I don't know that there's a direct percentage that anyone's come up with because a laboratory is not the on-field environment, obviously," Crandall told ESPN. "There's lots of things that players do on the fields that they're not easily replicating [in] the laboratory, but it is a significant blockage to transmission of droplets. There is no straight pathway through the face shield or visor for a droplet to be transmitted."

While Oakley is the official supplier of the shields for the NFL, the report mentions that players may end up other brands that are developing similar products.

"Just like everything we do, whether we're talking about better cleats or better performing helmets, it's all about something that's safer and yet also protects and in many cases enhances performance," Dr. Allen Sills, the NFL's chief medical officer, told ESPN. "That's the same mantra and the same sort of approach that we're taking here. I'm really pleased with how the work is going along.

“We're not at a finished product yet. Like most things in health safety, there's really no finish line here. So we're hoping to continue to innovate and improve as we go along. But we're excited about where we are and excited about the potential role this may play in risk mitigation on the field."


RELATED: Here's where things stand with the 2020 NFL season and COVID-19

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