Bears

Eddy Pineiro’s leg injury throws Bears’ kicking status into flux, again

Eddy Pineiro’s leg injury throws Bears’ kicking status into flux, again

Bears kicker Eddy Pineiro was a surprise addition to the team’s injury report Saturday afternoon, and is officially listed as questionable for Monday night’s game against Washington with a right leg injury.

Coach Matt Nagy sounded optimistic the injury is “minor” in nature, and said despite feeling some pain Pineiro did kick in practice on Saturday. But the mere inclusion of him on the injury report raises concerns about the Bears’ kicking situation only six days after it appeared to have been solved with Pineiro’s game-winning 53-yard kick against the Denver Broncos.

“I think what we’ve got to do as these days go by let’s just see where he’s at,” Nagy said. “I’m going to be on the cautious side with him and we’ll just kind of feel out the pain part and if it’s something that’s going to affect him, then we’ll have a decision to make. If not — hopefully he’ll be okay.”

Nagy said the injury occurred in the weight room at Halas Hall, and stressed the cautious approach he and the Bears’ training staff is taking to Pineiro. And the Bears’ coach consistently presented an optimistic outlook for Pineiro when answering questions from the media on Saturday.

Still, if Pineiro cannot play on Monday, the Bears will be in a bind. Punter Pat O’Donnell has never attempted a field goal in his NFL or college career, though Nagy did say O’Donnell “has some experience.” The most recent memory of O’Donnell working on field goals came during halftime of a loss to the San Francisco 49ers in 2017, when then-kicker Cairo Santos was hurt, though he didn’t attempt a kick in the second half of that contest. 

“I don’t want to rush to judgment yet,” Nagy said. “That’s not where we’re at. I really do think that we’ll be okay. We just want to make sure that we’re doing everything the right way with him, with his pain, and we’ve got to communicate with him, see how he feels, and it’s probably going to be one of those deals where in a couple days where he’s at and we’ve got to make a decision.”

So all of a sudden, Pineiro’s status will be critical to monitor in the hours leading up to Monday night’s game (the Bears have to submit inactive players 90 minutes before kickoff). If Pineiro is unable to play, will the Bears actually use O’Donnell for field goals? Or will Nagy lean into his aggressive nature and try to convert fourth downs and two-point conversions?

It feels disappointing for the Bears to even have to entertain these questions at this point. If Nagy’s optimism proves to be founded, the Bears won’t have an issue Monday night. But if they do, it’ll put plenty of pressure on a sputtering offense to make sure a game against a winless team doesn’t come down to another kick.

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Matt Nagy, Chicago Bears learning from LA Clippers coach Doc Rivers

Matt Nagy, Chicago Bears learning from LA Clippers coach Doc Rivers

The Bears are reportedly getting value out of the virtual speaker series they launched while under stay-at-home orders

According to the Los Angeles Times, one particularly gripping guest was Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who spoke to the team for an hour and fifteen minutes on May 21.

“I’ve heard a lot of people talk to groups,” Matt Nagy said via the LA Times. “And Doc, to me, not to take anything away from anybody else, but that was one of the most powerful hour-and-15-minute discussions that I had selfishly for myself and we had as a team.”

Rivers is one of the most successful basketball coaches in NBA history, leading the Boston Celtics to a championship in 2008 and winning Coach of the Year in 2000 with the Orlando Magic. He’s also tied with Red Auerbach for 12th all-time in wins at 938.

He’s also a Chicago native who attended Proviso East, so he’s a big Bears fan too.

“Talking to the Bears, the whole team, are you kidding me?” Rivers told the LA Times. “I was jacked up about that.”

Apparently the Bears were pretty “jacked up” too, because according to the report after the talk ended Nagy’s phone blew up with players and coaches wondering if they could ask Rivers more questions.

Some of the things they did talk about, according to the report: how Rivers scored 54 points in a high school game only to be pushed harder by his dad, organizing a duck boat ride for Boston’s “big three” in 2007 to motivate them for a future parade route, and Kawhi Leonard’s leadership style.

“Man, there was so much good stuff in there,” Nagy said. “A lot of the stuff I don’t even want to tell because I don’t want other people to know.”

RELATED: Leadership lessons Ryan Pace learned from time with Sean Payton, Saints

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Did fear of Aaron Rodgers lead Bears to vote down change to onside kick rule?

Did fear of Aaron Rodgers lead Bears to vote down change to onside kick rule?

The Chicago Bears have had the unfortunate reality of playing against Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers twice a year since he became the team's starter in 2008. 

In total, the Bears have faced Rodgers 23 times and have an atrocious 5-18 record against him. Simply put, he's owned Chicago, and the last thing the Bears want is for Rodgers, or any quality quarterback, to be given a chance to keep a comeback alive with the proposed (and voted down) change to the onside kick rule.

In case you missed it, the league voted against allowing teams the option of a 4th-and-15 play instead of the onside kick to keep possession of the ball. The proposal failed by a ridiculously close 16-16 vote, and the Bears were one of the teams that voted against it, according to NFL.com's Mike Garafolo.

Garafolo shared some insight as to why the Bears voted it down, even if it was tongue-in-cheek.

"One team said in jest, 'if you have a future Hall of Fame quarterback on your roster, you should be excluded from the conversation.' I'm told the team that joked about it was the Chicago Bears," Garofolo said. "So they were referencing Rodgers. How about that one?"

Unfortunately, the Bears haven't had the benefit of fielding a future Hall of Fame quarterback...ever. And in a season where the team doesn't know who their starter will be, it's no surprise they treated this rule as a competitive disadvantage.

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