Bears

Ex-Bears OC Dowell Loggains reportedly to interview for Dolphins’ head coaching job

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USA Today

Ex-Bears OC Dowell Loggains reportedly to interview for Dolphins’ head coaching job

Former Bears offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains will interview for the Miami Dolphins’ vacant head coaching position, NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport reported Friday morning. 
 
https://twitter.com/RapSheet/status/1083738143449378816
 
Perhaps the Dolphins are just killing time while waiting for an assistant whose team is still in the playoffs — like New England Patriots defensive coordinator Brian Flores — to become officially available. Or maybe Miami is serious about listening to Loggains’ pitch to lead their franchise after Adam Gase was fired earlier this month. 
 
Loggains left Chicago as not exactly the most popular offensive coordinator in team history, having called the plays during an uninspired, dour 2017 season in which Mitch Trubisky made his NFL debut. The Bears severely lacked talent in 2017 — especially at wide receiver — but Loggains’ comments about opposing defenses dictating his usage of a then-rookie Tarik Cohen struck a nerve on a team with a dearth of playmakers. 
 
The Dolphins’ offense ranked 26th in DVOA, while the Bears in 2017 ranked 28th. Gase brought Loggains, who was the Bears’ quarterbacks coach while Gase was the offensive coordinator in 2015, to Miami a year ago to be his offensive coordinator. 
 
Loggains, though, does have a creative mind and is a football junkie who called the play now known as the “Philly Special” a year before the Eagles ran it in the Super Bowl. 
 
If Loggains were to get the Dolphins gig, though, he wouldn’t get a shot at revenge against the Bears until 2022 (unless the two teams play in the Super Bowl!). But maybe coordinating Brock Osweiler’s destruction of the league’s best defense back in October is revenge enough. 

Bears show interest in Tulsa pass rusher Trevis Gipson

Bears show interest in Tulsa pass rusher Trevis Gipson

It's early (extremely early) in the 2020 NFL Draft process, and the Bears' team needs between now and when their first pick (No. 43 overall) is on the clock are certain to change. The general consensus right now is that offensive line, tight end and quarterback will be early draft targets, but edge rusher can't be overlooked.

Leonard Floyd's failure to emerge as the pass rusher the Bears need to complement Khalil Mack is a bigger problem than GM Ryan Pace or coach Matt Nagy want to admit. In fact, Floyd's ineffective style of play could cost Chicago a chance at becoming a truly elite defense and potentially limit the astronomical upside Mack has as a generational talent.

If the Bears decide to pull the fifth-year option from Floyd, they'll have no choice but to attack the position early in the 2020 draft. It appears like they're doing their homework for that scenario, too.

Bears scouts met with Tulsa edge rusher Trevis Gipson at length following Wednesday's Senior Bowl practice, an indication that the position is at least high enough on their wish list that extensive homework on pass rushers is being done.

Gipson helped his draft stock at the Senior Bowl and was an early winner among edge rushers at the game. His practice reps confirmed his tape; the dude knows how to get to the quarterback. He had eight sacks in 2019 and plays with a high-energy style that's certain to entice Chicago's coaching staff. He isn't an elite athlete, but he has an appealing frame (34-inch arms) and powerful hands.

Gipson began the week as a late-Day-3 prospect. He helped his stock and may have jumped a round or two along the way.

Bears' rookie class ranked 8th-best in NFL

Bears' rookie class ranked 8th-best in NFL

The Bears didn't have much of a rookie class in 2019. Last April's draft produced just five picks, two of which didn't appear in a regular-season game for the Bears.

But the production of running back David Montgomery was enough to carry the rookie class to a top-10 ranking, according to Pro Football Focus.

The Bears checked-in at eighth.

The Bears have a strange class. They had only five picks, none before Round 3, with three of those five selections coming after Round 6. As a result, their expected return was low. Running back David Montgomery was really the only Bears' rookie to play significant snaps, and he managed to provide enough return from his third-round selection to land them at No. 8.

It's pretty remarkable that Chicago's 2019 rookie class — essentially, Montgomery — garnered this much respect from PFF. Wide receiver Riley Ridley showed signs of life late in the season and cornerback Duke Shelley will be given an opportunity to carve out a role on defense next season, but with running back Kerrith Whyte, Jr. and cornerback Stephen Denmark making no impact whatsoever (Whyte is no longer with the team), the 2019 class won't be remembered as one that laid a championship foundation in Chicago.

Sure, Montgomery has a chance to become one of the NFL's more talented starting running backs (he ended his rookie season with 889 yards and six touchdowns), but if Ridley and Shelley don't turn into legitimate contributors in 2020 or 2021, the class will go down as an epic failure for GM Ryan Pace.

Remember: The Bears didn't have a first-round pick because of the trade for outside linebacker Khalil Mack. That's a win for Pace, but it doesn't change the fact that he had five selections at his disposal and ended up with what appears to be just one impact player after their rookie seasons.