Bears

Former Bears edge rusher Lamarr Houston officially retires after 8 seasons in the NFL

Former Bears edge rusher Lamarr Houston officially retires after 8 seasons in the NFL

On Wednesday, former Raiders and Bears edge rusher Lamarr Houston decided to officially retire after eight seasons in the NFL. Houston was an intriguing prospect coming out of Texas and got off to a fast start after being drafted by the Raiders in the second round in 2010.  He was named to the 2010 NFL All-Rookie team after amassing five sacks and making a name for himself in the process. 

Houston played for Chicago from 2014 to 2017, totaling 31 games and 11 starts over his Bears' tenure. He came to the Bears following a career-best six-sack season with Oakland, and the Bears had high hopes for him and additional free-agent acquisition Jared Allen to help improve their abysmal defense (30th in points against in 2013). Instead, Houston struggled to stay on the field, only collecting one sack playing in eight games in his first season with the Bears. Houston will most infamously be remembered for injuring himself while celebrating a sack of then-New England Patriots backup QB Jimmy Garoppolo, who Houston sacked in a game the Bears were trailing by 25 points. 

Houston's tenure with the Bears was up-and-down (13.0 sacks over four years in Chicago) but his career was solid nonetheless. His Raiders' days were definitely the highlight of his career and fittingly, he signed a one-day contract with the Raiders so he could officially retire as a member of their organization.

Lamarr Houston finished his NFL career with 302 tackles, 30.0 sacks, five forced fumbles, and an interception over 100 games. 

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What Bears will miss conducting 2020 NFL Draft remotely from home

What Bears will miss conducting 2020 NFL Draft remotely from home


At least the Bears got to use their brand-new, high-tech draft room last year.

As part of a massive renovation and expansion of Halas Hall, the Bears built a new state-of-the-art draft room with general manager Ryan Pace's fingerprints all over it. The media got to sneak a peak at it last year, and it’s truly impressive in how it helps, functionally, to conduct a draft.

The size of the draft board, in particular, is stunning. Nobody's squinting at a grainy screen to watch tape of a prospect.

“It's tied into our scouting database, so there's a million things we can pull up on this wall or however you want to do it,” Pace said last year. “The ability to sit in one room as a staff and, really the draft is one thing, but (for) all these meetings. We can pull up multiple things at the same time at our fingertips.”

A player’s measurables, interviews, comps, etc. are all immediately available to everyone in the room, helping foster the discussions that lead to the Bears making a pick. It’s not like the team can’t function without it, but as Pace said in 2019, “It's kind of endless what we have, and I feel like we're just kind of scratching the surface now, and we have the staff to keep on pushing that.”

A year later, the Bears — like every other NFL team — are mandated to conduct the draft remotely from home. No small gatherings in a large event space. No popping over to a scout’s house for a face-to-face discussion. And certainly no congregating around the gigantic digital draft board in that room at Halas Hall.

RELATED: NFL tells teams to keep facilities closed for "fully virtual" draft

On a teleconference last week, Pace said, “Obviously there are some challenges with that.” He talked about the possibility of using the technology in that draft room with a limited number of people or conducting the draft at an offsite location.

It’s clear that nobody — not in Chicago, not in any front office — really wants to do the draft over a Zoom teleconference. But it’s how the 2020 draft will happen, and the Bears are going to have to make the best of it.

The Bears are confident in their ability to technologically adapt to 2020’s unprecedented but necessary way of drafting. Coaches and scouts have remote access to the Bears’ internal video and scouting systems, and one would figure even the most old-school coach or scout has had to become technologically savvy over the last few weeks. 

‘We appreciate the hard work with our IT and video department, they’re studs, they’ve been amazing,” coach Matt Nagy said. “Coaching staff, personnel, everyone’s been working really hard together. It’s been different but unique, and it’s been fun finding out solutions and new ways with technology of how to do things, whether it’s through the draft or coaching staff meetings.”

My thought here is that the Bears should be fine making their 2020 picks from home. That goes for the other 31 teams in the league, too.

But Pace and his front office like to be active in the college free agent market, which is always a fire drill of sorts as the draft comes to a close. And the social distancing and work from home mandates amid the COVID-19 pandemic have lessened every team’s ability to connect with those undrafted free agents. It’ll make things more chaotic for the Bears’ front office on April 25.

“A lot of our 30 visits are guys that we're projecting as college free agents we're trying to recruit,” Pace said last year (all interviews have to be done over the phone or via FaceTime this year). “Us going out to colleges, spending time at their pro days or having private workouts are for those reasons. Building relationships with their agents. Because the groundwork has to be done before then or you're going to lose out.”

There’s often way too much hype over undrafted free agents (Remember Emanuel Hall last year?). But the Bears have found a number of productive players from those ranks. Bryce Callahan, Roy Robertson-Harris, Cameron Meredith, Kevin Toliver II were all undrafted free agents who made it in Chicago, to varying extents. Signing the next Robertson-Harris or Callahan might be a little harder this year.

The draft, though? It won’t be ideal to conduct it from everyone’s individual office or basement as opposed to a buzzing draft room. But that should be fine… so long as no one’s WiFi cuts out.

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Jay Cutler is waiting out the outbreak in The Bahamas to predictable results

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USA TODAY

Jay Cutler is waiting out the outbreak in The Bahamas to predictable results

Jay Cutler traveled to The Bahamas with family and friends as the COVID-19 outbreak escalated and now it seems like he will be waiting out the pandemic in island paradise.

The former Bears quarterback’s Instagram account, run by his reality star wife Kristin Cavallari, has some shots of what Cutler has been up to. It’s a long way from sitting on the couch and watching Netflix.

First of all, he has his own version of the Wilson volleyball from “Castaway.”

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Day 12. Just me and Molten. She's the best.

A post shared by Jay Cutler (@ifjayhadinstagram) on


Then there’s this one, which is up to the viewer's discretion to figure out what’s going on here.

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Day 28. No TP needed

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Apparently, Cutler went to the Bahamas with Cavallari, their kids and two friends who also appear on “Very Cavallari,” the currently running reality show that Cutler has unwittingly become the best part of.

There’s more info here on the logistics of how they got stuck there and just how stuck they really are. It’s a wild ride.