Bears

Matt Nagy, Chicago Bears learning from LA Clippers coach Doc Rivers

Matt Nagy, Chicago Bears learning from LA Clippers coach Doc Rivers

The Bears are reportedly getting value out of the virtual speaker series they launched while under stay-at-home orders

According to the Los Angeles Times, one particularly gripping guest was Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who spoke to the team for an hour and fifteen minutes on May 21.

“I’ve heard a lot of people talk to groups,” Matt Nagy said via the LA Times. “And Doc, to me, not to take anything away from anybody else, but that was one of the most powerful hour-and-15-minute discussions that I had selfishly for myself and we had as a team.”

Rivers is one of the most successful basketball coaches in NBA history, leading the Boston Celtics to a championship in 2008 and winning Coach of the Year in 2000 with the Orlando Magic. He’s also tied with Red Auerbach for 12th all-time in wins at 938.

He’s also a Chicago native who attended Proviso East, so he’s a big Bears fan too.

“Talking to the Bears, the whole team, are you kidding me?” Rivers told the LA Times. “I was jacked up about that.”

Apparently the Bears were pretty “jacked up” too, because according to the report after the talk ended Nagy’s phone blew up with players and coaches wondering if they could ask Rivers more questions.

Some of the things they did talk about, according to the report: how Rivers scored 54 points in a high school game only to be pushed harder by his dad, organizing a duck boat ride for Boston’s “big three” in 2007 to motivate them for a future parade route, and Kawhi Leonard’s leadership style.

“Man, there was so much good stuff in there,” Nagy said. “A lot of the stuff I don’t even want to tell because I don’t want other people to know.”

RELATED: Leadership lessons Ryan Pace learned from time with Sean Payton, Saints

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Under Center Podcast: Rotoworld's Josh Norris on Ryan Pace's 2020 draft

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USA Today

Under Center Podcast: Rotoworld's Josh Norris on Ryan Pace's 2020 draft

JJ Stankevitz is joined by draft expert Josh Norris of NBC Sports and Rotoworld, as they take a deep dive into the Bears' 2020 NFL draft class featuring Cole Kmet and Jaylon Johnson. They also dive into the Bears' offseason moves and can the newly acquired players from the draft and free agency make an instant impact for the 2020 season.


(1:23) - Overall impression of what the Bears accomplished in the 2020 draft


(5:00) - Cole Kmet vs Adam Shaheen


(9:37) - Was Jaylon Johnson a 1st round talent


(15:00) - Ryan Pace's 5th round selections


(21:10) - Biggest issues with the Bears draft

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NFL reveals football helmet mouth shields to prevent COVID-19 spread

NFL reveals football helmet mouth shields to prevent COVID-19 spread

The majority of the football world got its first glimpse of a new mouth shield developed by Oakley on Monday. The shield was designed to help protect players from the COVID-19 pandemic while they’re on the field.

According to ESPN, there is currently no mandate for players to wear the protective shield, however the NFL’s medical experts are advocating its use.

Click to download the MyTeams App for the latest Bears news and analysis.

The shields have already been distributed to the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers for feedback, according to the ESPN report. That report mentions the two biggest concerns about the shields so far are visibility and breathability.

Most importantly, the NFL's engineering committee Dr. Jeff Crandall told ESPN that the shields prevent direct transmission of droplets from players’ mouths.

Per the report, Oakley tested the shields by spraying fluid particles to mimic droplets expelled by players.

"I don't know that there's a direct percentage that anyone's come up with because a laboratory is not the on-field environment, obviously," Crandall told ESPN. "There's lots of things that players do on the fields that they're not easily replicating [in] the laboratory, but it is a significant blockage to transmission of droplets. There is no straight pathway through the face shield or visor for a droplet to be transmitted."

While Oakley is the official supplier of the shields for the NFL, the report mentions that players may end up other brands that are developing similar products.

"Just like everything we do, whether we're talking about better cleats or better performing helmets, it's all about something that's safer and yet also protects and in many cases enhances performance," Dr. Allen Sills, the NFL's chief medical officer, told ESPN. "That's the same mantra and the same sort of approach that we're taking here. I'm really pleased with how the work is going along.

“We're not at a finished product yet. Like most things in health safety, there's really no finish line here. So we're hoping to continue to innovate and improve as we go along. But we're excited about where we are and excited about the potential role this may play in risk mitigation on the field."


RELATED: Here's where things stand with the 2020 NFL season and COVID-19

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