Bears

Mitch Musings: Trubisky progressing as he preps to face the gold standard of QBs

Mitch Musings: Trubisky progressing as he preps to face the gold standard of QBs

 Tom Brady has been credited with 54 game-winning drives in his Hall of Fame career, five of which have come in Super Bowls — all five Super Bowls he and Bill Belichick have won. 
 
To put it another way: Brady has engineered a game-winning drive in 18 percent of his regular season and playoff starts, while he’s only lost 22 percent of his career starts. 
 
“He just has this mentality that at the end of the game, they’re going to win because of him,” coach Matt Nagy said. “He’s going to make a special throw.”
 
The expectation for Brady is that he’s going to put together a fourth quarter comeback or a game-winning drive if given the chance. It’s not like he’s a markedly better quarterback in those close-and-late situations — in fact, his lowest passer rating by quarter comes in the fourth. But that rating is 94.2; his career rating is 97.4. Effectively, he’s the same quarterback. 
 
That baseline level of success is, undoubtedly, something for which Mitch Trubisky is striving. But the Bears’ rookie isn’t there yet, as evidenced by his career splits:
 
Fourth quarter: 86/151 (57 percent), 6 TDs, 6 INTs, 71.2 passer rating, 6.0 yards/attempt
Overall: 309/491 (63 percent), 18 TDs, 11 INTs, 86.7 passer rating, 7.0 yards/attempt
 
That factors in 2017, of course, and Trubisky’s numbers from that season aren’t as relevant as the overall experience he gained. There’s a much smaller sample size in 2018, but the fourth quarter downturn is still present:
 
2018 fourth quarter: 22/34 (65 percent), 2 TD, 1 INT, 94.1 passer rating, 7.4 yards/attempt
2018 overall: 113/161 (70 percent), 11 TDs, 4 INTs, 105.6 passer rating, 8.1 yards/attempt
 
The good news, perhaps, is that the gap is closing. That’s an area of progress the Bears needed, and still need, to see in 2018. Trubisky completed eight of 11 passes for 141 yards with a touchdown — and an interception in the end zone — on Sunday in Miami, and very well could’ve been credited with a game-winning drive had Tarik Cohen not fumbled near midfield with under three minutes remaining.
 
But the touchdown he threw to Anthony Miller, too, could’ve been a game-winner had the Bears’ defense not immediately given up a 75-yard touchdown on Miami’s ensuing drive.
 
“We’re continuing to grow and that’s one of those clutch plays that you have to make as an offense to help out the defense and put the team in a good position to win games and it was a big moment and I think a big area of growth for our offense and myself as a quarterback,” Trubisky said. “We’re just gonna have to continue to grow and make those types of plays to be able to give ourselves a chance to win every week.” 
 
Reid It and Weep?
 
The last three times Andy Reid, or an Andy Reid disciple, has faced the Patriots, their team has scored 40 or more points. Reid and Nagy teamed up to drop 42 on New England in 2017’s season opener, and Doug Pederson — Reid’s offensive coordinator prior to Nagy — put up 41 to win Super Bowl LII. On Sunday, Reid’s Chiefs scored 40 in a three-point loss in Foxboro. 
 
Maybe that matters on Sunday at Soldier Field, maybe it doesn’t. But for Trubisky, that Nagy had that success a year ago against New England “for sure” gives him a confidence boost. 
 
“I think coach Nagy knows this opponent very well,” Trubisky said. “I mean, he studies as much tape as anyone throughout the week and he’s had success against this team, so that definitely gives me confidence, and it’s just me and him continuing to communicate and being on the same page. He’s given me a lot of confidence that we’ll be able to move the ball and put up points against these guys this weekend. 
 
“So we just got to continue to take care of the football, be smart, while staying aggressive, but it definitely gives confidence knowing that coach Nags, that he knows these guys pretty well and has had success in the past, but we still got to go out there and do our jobs because the past success doesn’t determine future success. You still got to go out there and execute on the field and we know that.”
 
Belichick is a master of taking away what an opponent does best. But a common thread between those Chiefs and Eagles teams is having multiple weapons, to the point where taking the best one away isn’t a deterrent to scoring. The Bears may not have the same pick-your-poison roster as the Chiefs, who still put up 40 points despite New England muting Travis Kelce’s production on Sunday. 
 
But Trubisky and this offense might be trending that way, if Sunday’s 28-point second half against a good Miami defense is any indication. 
 
One Last Time To Not Count Out Touchdown Tom
 
Back to Brady for one final thought here: Trubisky was seven years old when Brady won his first Super Bowl back in 2002. The Bears’ quarterback probably doesn’t have much memory of an NFL in which Brady hasn’t been regarded as the most successful quarterback in the league.
 
Sunday will mark Brady’s final trip to Chicago in his career, unless he winds up quarterbacking another team (highly unlikely) or playing until he’s 49 (extremely unlikely). While he and Drew Brees and Philip Rivers and Ben Roethlisberger still may have a few good years left in them, and Aaron Rodgers certainly has more than a few good years left, it feels like the quarterbacking torch is finally being passed from those veterans to a young, exciting group of passers like Carson Wentz, Jared Goff and Patrick Mahomes. Trubisky could be part of that not-quite-established-but-close group, too, if what he’s done in the last two games turns out to be sustainable. 
 
So for Trubisky, getting to compete against Brady on Sunday comes as a special opportunity. 
 
“I admire his competitiveness and just following his journey and what he’s had to overcome to be able to get where he’s at,” Trubisky said. “It’s very admirable and doing it this long, this well over a long period of time is pretty incredible. So you always look at that. And what they’ve been able to do. As a quarterback you’re judged by how many games you win and he’s been successful at that as well, so obviously he’s one of the best to do it. And it’s cool to watch his film as well as many other guys over the years, pick up anything you possibly can. Yeah, he’s had a lot of success so you definitely look at what kind of traits he has to be able to lead his teams to that many wins over a long period of time. 
 
“Is it cool? Yeah, for sure. But I think it’s just a testament to him of how he’s been able to do it for this long and still be that successful. And he’s just really been able to push the limits at what can be accomplished at this position and how everybody looks at it. He’s really taken this thing to new levels and it’ll be cool to compete against him on Sunday.” 

Bears hire Deshea Townsend as defensive backs coach

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USA Today

Bears hire Deshea Townsend as defensive backs coach

The Bears unveiled their first assistant coach hiring since bringing aboard Chuck Pagano as their defensive coordinator, with Matt Nagy announcing the addition of Deshea Townsend as defensive backs coach on Friday. 

Townsend, a former cornerback and 13-year NFL veteran, had previous coaching stops with the New York Giants (assistant defensive backs coach, 2018), Tennessee Titans (secondary coach, 2016-2017), Mississippi State (cornerbacks, 2013-2015) and Arizona Cardinals (assistant defensive backs, 2011-2012). 

Townsend finished his career with 21 interceptions, 15 1/2 sacks and 112 passes defended in 191 games spent primarily with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1998-2009) and Indianapolis Colts (2010). 

Rumors swirled for the last week about the Bears’ potential interest in hiring future Hall of Famer Ed Reed as a defensive backs coach under Pagano, who coached him in college at Miami and in the NFL with the Baltimore Ravens. Pagano and Reed are coaching together at the NFLPA Bowl this week.

The Bears appear to have retained defensive line coach Jay Rodgers, while the team announced Ronell Williams was hired on Friday as a defensive quality control coach, a position previously held by Sean Desai.

What should the Bears do with impending free agent Adrian Amos?

What should the Bears do with impending free agent Adrian Amos?

The Bears entered 2018 with two key members of their 2015 draft class playing the final year of their rookie contracts: Defensive lineman Eddie Goldman and safety Adrian Amos.
 
Goldman received a four-year, $42.04 million contract extension with $25 million guaranteed prior to Week 1, cementing him as the anchor for the Bears’ 3-4 base defense for years to come. Amos, meanwhile, was left to play out the final year of his rookie contract and will become an unrestricted free agent in two months.
 
“Really, it’s nothing in my hands anymore,” Amos said at Halas Hall a day after the Bears’ season ended. “I put my tape out there. I played with my teammates. I was really focused more on trying to win a Super Bowl this year. Just, man, it’s a hard day. I know I keep saying that. But it’s a hard day, a hard situation right now.”
 
For Amos, the frustrating feelings of coming up short in the playoffs with that 16-15 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles will fade. The idea of “unfinished business” won’t take precedent over, well, business. Both he and the Bears will have a decision to make in the coming months.
 
The first question is how the Bears value the 25-year-old safety. Amos set career highs in interceptions (two), pass break-ups (seven) and tackles (73) in 2018, all while playing the highest percentage of snaps (97.7 percent) of anyone on Vic Fangio’s defense. He’s proven to be a largely durable player in his four years in Chicago, playing over 1,000 snaps twice (2015, 2018) and dipping below 80 percent of his team’s defensive snaps once (2017, when he missed three games but also didn’t start until Week 4).
 
Amos and Eddie Jackson played off each other well, with Jackson fitting as a rangy ball-hawk and Amos a physical in-the-box type who’s adept against the run. He’s been graded well by Pro Football Focus, for what it’s worth, receiving an 82.7 grade in 2018 and 90.9 grade in 2017.
 
But if the Bears’ internal graded mimicked those of PFF, Amos probably would’ve been signed to an extension. Or, possibly, Ryan Pace is cognizant of the market for free agent safeties and isn’t prepared to commit a significant amount of money to Amos.
 
The largest contract given to a free agent safety in 2018 was a three-year, $16.35 million deal signed by Kurt Coleman with the Carolina Panthers. Tyrann Mathieu, the versatile former All-Pro, had to settle for a one-year, $7 million deal with the Houston Texans (of which $6.5 million was guaranteed, the highest guaranteed money figure for a free agent safety last year). Tre Boston, who had five interceptions in 2017, had to wait until just before training camp to sign a one-year, $1.5 million deal with the Arizona Cardinals with only $800,000 guaranteed.
 
Granted, just one year prior, seven free agent safeties received contracts of three or more years with total values over $12 million (including Quintin Demps, who Amos replaced in the starting lineup after a season-ending injury in Week 3). Maybe 2018 was just a bad year for safeties — the Giants’ Landon Collins and the Rams’ LaMarcus Joyner will command hefty contracts, while Seattle’s Earl Thomas will be in high demand. There’s not only more star power in this safety free agent class, but more depth, too — with Amos included in that.
 
“It's an old cliché but you're never staying the same; you're either getting better or you're getting worse,” Pace said. “We need to make sure we're getting better.”
 
Amos’ durability and solid play are certainly positive traits, ones the Bears could deem worthy of a new contract. But would bringing back Amos mean the Bears would be getting better, especially if it comes at the expense of a need elsewhere? Or do the Bears believe Amos could have another gear to his game in Chuck Pagano’s scheme?
 
The Bears’ safety duo in 2018 was acquired in the fourth (Jackson) and fifth (Amos) rounds of the 2017 and 2015 NFL Drafts, respectively. Perhaps the Bears, with around $25 million in cap space (after the expected release of tight end Dion Sims) will figure they can address the safety spot next to Jackson in a few different ways: a competition between a cheap free agent (perhaps like Tennessee’s Kenny Vaccaro, who was a first-round pick of the Saints in 2013 when Pace was there and made $1.5 million in 2018), a mid/late-round draft pick, or an internal option (like Deon Bush).
 
Pace, too, may be more willing to use that limited cap space on attempting to retain slot corner Bryce Callahan and/or right tackle Bobby Massie, while using the remaining funds to address across-the-board depth. Alternatively, Amos has earned the opportunity to cash in – if the opportunity is there – after four years of reliable, solid play on a relatively cheap rookie contract.
 
So there are plenty of questions to be answered over the next few weeks and months regarding Amos and a potentially vacant spot at safety. Whatever happens, though, Amos will approach his impending free agency with a clear head about what appears to be a cloudy future.
 
“I always come out here and give it my all,” Amos said. “This year, we were a better team. We had a lot of success on defense this year. But I feel like I’ve been pretty consistent over my years here. You have bad games here and there; you have great games here and there.
 
“Overall, I just hope my tape speaks for itself. When coaches watch my film, (people) upstairs, they see what I bring to the table as far as communication, athleticism, everything they would want to see. I hope they’ve seen it, but I can’t worry about what they did see, but it’s already happened.”