Bears

Mitch Trubisky expects to play on Sunday night against the L.A. Rams

Mitch Trubisky expects to play on Sunday night against the L.A. Rams

The popular expression around Halas Hall over the last two weeks has been that Mitch Trubisky's "arrow is pointing up."

Now, as of Wednesday afternoon, it looks like the arrow's pointing towards a return to action on Sunday night. 

Trubisky met with media this afternoon, and was asked point-blank if he expects to play this week. 

"I do," Trubisky said. "I just got to show coach that I can play, so I'm feeling good about where I'm at as long as I can show them that I can go out there and do it, and make all the throws, and be the player that I know I am. I feel confident that I'll be ready to go."

Trubisky wouldn't get into the specifics of his shoulder rehab, saying only that it's been "everything you could possible think of as far as recovery goes." 

The Bears wouldn't specify what the plan is for Trubisky in regards to Wednesday's practice. 

"We'll see with the full participation part," Matt Nagy said. "We're going to see how he feels today and hopefully, like I've been saying, he feels good and we can get him out there. I don't know as far as the full participation part. As we go along in practice we'll test out his pain tollerance and all that and see where he's at."

"If he feels good, and seems right, then we'll get him out there for sure." 

Trubisky mentioned that pain tolerance has played a bigger role in his rehabilitation than it has in the past. 

"It's different than any other injury because it's my throwing shoulde," he said. "And it's something that I'm going to need for the rest of my career obviously. Any time there's pain I'm just communicating that and being smart about it. My pain tollerance has gone up over the years, just being able to know what you can play through and know when you need to pull back a little bit. It's being smart, communicating to the staff and all that, and really not trying to be a superhero because you don't want anything to linger the rest of this year, my career going forward, especially since it's so crucial being my throwing shoulder." 

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Bears offer custom wallpapers for video calls, Allen Robinson wants one too

Bears offer custom wallpapers for video calls, Allen Robinson wants one too

To help fans get excited for football season (fingers crossed it will start on time, but who knows) the Bears offered to make custom wallpapers for fans who tweet their last name and preferred number at the Bears’ main Twitter account. 

Perfect for showing off your Chicago spirit and spicing up online classes or conference calls! Not only did fans get a kick out of seeing their name on a digital jersey, Bears wide receiver Allen Robinson got in on the fun too. 

Despite Robinson probably owning many, many things (both digital and physical) with his name and number on them, Bears’ Twitter was happy to oblige. 

This led many fans online to continue calling for his contract extension, but right now the Bears and Robinson seem to be focusing on the present and trying to have some light-hearted fun during these uncertain times.

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What Nick Foles' contract says about how Bears view him vs. Mitch Trubisky

What Nick Foles' contract says about how Bears view him vs. Mitch Trubisky

Nick Foles will only carry an $8 million cap hit in 2020. So maybe that’s why the Bears were willing to part with a fourth-round pick to get him. 

In fact, the contract details of Foles’ restructured deal do make the Bears’ trade to get him look a lot more reasonable:

Foles’ $8 million cap hit in 2020 ranks tied for 25th among quarterbacks, and is over $1 million less than what Mitch Trubisky is due this year. And it’s only $2 million more than Chase Daniel’s cap hit was in 2019 — this for a guy who will, at the very least, actually push Trubisky. 

But here’s the most important part of this whole cap thing:

The Bears are not financially tied to starting Foles in 2020. Trubisky is taking up more cap space, after all, and $8 million is not walk-in-the-door-QB1 money. 

Foles’ restructured contract makes it feel like the Bears still want Trubisky to be their starter. That may be more hope than realism, and realism will win out once both hit the practice field. But the point is the Bears don’t *have* to start Foles because they traded a fourth-round pick and are paying a bunch of money for his services. 

They traded a fourth-round pick and are paying him a reasonable amount of money to compete for their starting job. 

Now, does that mean Foles has a worse chance of being the Bears’ Week 1 starter because we know the details of his contract? No. There can be a big difference between hoping Trubisky is QB1 and expecting Foles to be the guy.

It’s why you’ll probably hear Ryan Pace and Matt Nagy downplay the Foles trade a bit, whenever we hear from them next. They can traffic in hope publicly while keeping their expectations — whatever they may be — private.

It all goes back to the money. If the Bears were paying Andy Dalton $17 million or Teddy Bridgewater $20 million this year, it’d be difficult for Pace/Nagy to say with a straight face there’s a true competition happening. Those guys would’ve been acquired to start.

But Foles? $8 million can be backup money. It can also be starter money, because Trubisky's $9.2 million cap hit can be backup money, too.

We’ll hopefully see what it winds up being come this summer. But until those practices get underway, everything is still on the table between Foles and Trubisky for the Bears. All you have to do is follow the money.

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