The Bears’ draft is officially in the books, and although they did some wheeling and dealing on Saturday, they still ended up with seven selections in the 2020 NFL Draft.

Now it’s time to figure out how much impact these rookies can have on a team that has playoff and Super Bowl aspirations this season. The Bears addressed many of their needs, but will the results come immediately?

Here’s how I would rank the immediate impact the Bears’ draft class can have on the 2020 season:

1. CB Jaylon Johnson, Utah (2nd round, No. 50 overall)

2020 impact: Starter

The Bears’ second selection on Friday night has a great chance to start right away. While he tends to gamble and get beat deep from time to time, Johnson has the size and length to plug in right away on the opposite side of Kyle Fuller. The big question is his shoulder, which was operated on in March. Assuming there are no setbacks, Johnson can be an immediate starter.

(Pick analysis)

2. TE Cole Kmet, Notre Dame (2nd round, No. 43 overall)

2020 impact: Starting “Y” tight end

After releasing Trey Burton, there will be an expectation for Kmet to contribute right away. Patience is needed, as almost every tight end needs time to acclimate themselves to the NFL. But Kmet is already the best “Y” tight end on the roster, and even if there are growing pains, he will likely have to develop on the field out of necessity. I’d expect a solid rookie season with a chance to really breakout in 2021.

 

(Pick analysis)

3. WR Darnell Mooney, Tulane (5th round, No. 173)

2020 impact: Important contributor

The Bears really like this speedy, explosive receiver, and they showed it by trading up to get him in the fifth round. Mooney is capable of having a similar impact as Tarik Cohen did as a rookie simply because his speed and explosiveness are NFL ready. But like Cohen, his smaller size will lead to limited usage. Mooney also needs to get stronger, although he shows a willingness to fight through contact and not back down. I can see Matt Nagy already devising a plan to get the ball to Mooney a handful of times per game.

(Pick analysis)

4. CB Kindle Vildor, Georgia Southern (5th round, No. 163)

2020 impact: Special teams/depth

A little undersized at just under 5-10, Vildor has good enough length to make up for it, giving him the versatility to get on the field at multiple positions. He also has a knack for making plays on the ball, and if he consistently does that in practice, he’ll press for playing time. But with Johnson likely to slide into a starting role alongside Kyle Fuller and Buster Skrine, Vildor will start his NFL career as a backup. Pace applauded his competitiveness and confidence, which indicates he has a demeanor that's needed on special teams. Vildor will have a chance to be active on game days.

(Pick analysis)

5. OLB Trevis Gipson, Tulsa (5th round, No. 155)

2020 impact: Special teams/depth

Gipson has the size and length to develop into a good 3-4 edge rusher, but he primarily played with his hand on the ground in Tulsa’s three-man front. I like him better as an outside linebacker in the Bears’ defense, but patience will be needed as he makes the position switch. He’s more of a developmental prospect and could be hindered in the short term without offseason practices. If not for the uncertain summer, I might have him ahead of Vildor on this list because I do like Gipson’s upside.

(Pick analysis)

6. OL Lachavious Simmons, Tennessee State (7th round, No. 227)

2020 impact: Practice squad

I’m not going to pretend to know who Simmons was before Saturday. But I was able to find some limited tape on him, and I did like his mentality in the run game. He looks like that mauler the Bears really need, finishing his blocks and driving defenders into the ground. Simmons can also play both tackle and guard spots, which gives him a shot to provide some depth if badly needed. That said, he’s making the jump from the FCS level as a seventh round pick, so he’s likely headed to the practice squad to develop.

(Pick analysis)

 

7. OG Arlington Hambright, Colorado (7th round, No. 226)

2020 impact: Practice squad

Hambright played left tackle at Oklahoma State and Colorado, but Pace said he’ll slide inside to guard at the next level, which is good because he doesn’t have the size to play outside. When I turned on the tape Saturday, the first thing I noticed is that Hambright is very quick out of his stance, which suggests he has good feet. He fires off the ball in the run game and quickly gets into his pass sets. That tells me he has a chance. Still, Hambright will be making a position switch and needs time to develop. He has less versatility than Simmons, which is why he lands last on this list.

(Pick analysis)

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