Bears

Ryan Pace on Kevin White: 'There is a lot of momentum with his play'

Ryan Pace on Kevin White: 'There is a lot of momentum with his play'

No player will get Bears fans riled up as much as former first-round pick Kevin White, who since being selected with the seventh pick overall in the 2015 NFL draft has been ravaged by injury and has yet to score a touchdown as a pro.

After an offseason focused on upgrading the Bears' wide receivers, White is facing a make-or-break year for his career.

White has enjoyed a productive offseason, arguably the best -- and healthiest -- of his brief career so far. General manager Ryan Pace has noticed, too.

"I just feel like there is a lot of momentum with his play," Pace said Thursday in Bourbonnais at the start of the team's training camp. 

"He's had a good offseason. He's playing with a lot of confidence."

Pace said the goal for White is to be the best player he can be, which the team once envisioned being a dominant force as an alpha receiver. While it's unfair to have that kind of expectation for White in 2018, it's also not impossible for him to rise to the challenge and become the team's next-best option after Allen Robinson. If he does that, he could set himself up for a lucrative contract extension or, in the alternative, a rich deal elsewhere.

Kindle Vildor dubbed Bears' rookie who could be surprise gem in 2020

Kindle Vildor dubbed Bears' rookie who could be surprise gem in 2020

Chicago Bears general manager Ryan Pace has a good eye for talent in the later rounds of the NFL Draft. He nailed picks like Eddie Jackson (fourth round), Jordan Howard (fifth round) and Adrian Amos (fifth round) over the years, and the hope is that one of his Day 3 picks in 2020 will continue that trend.

One player who has a chance to exceed his draft slot is Georgia Southern cornerback, Kindle Vildor, who Pace selected in the fifth round of April's draft. He was recently named the Bears' rookie who could be a surprise gem in 2020.

"We stress confidence when we talk about the corner position," general manager Ryan Pace told reporters. "And [Vildor] definitely has that confidence and that playing demeanor that we look for. A skill set that also translates well to special teams, which is going to be important especially in the early part of his development."

The two-time first-team All-Sun Belt performer will have to beat out a few veterans for reps, but his man-coverage and ball skills should fit favorably in the Bears' defensive scheme.

While most of the post-draft attention has been paid to another Bears rookie cornerback, second-round pick Jaylon Johnson, Vildor has a chance to earn significant playing time as a rookie. Only Kyle Fuller is assured a starting job at this point, and while Vildor faces an uphill battle to unseat Buster Skrine for reps, there's no reason to bet against him. Pace has always been a proponent of competition breeding the best results and if Vildor rises to the occasion, the Bears will waste little time inserting him into the lineup.

Vildor ended his college career with 94 tackles, nine interceptions and 25 passes defended.

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    NFL, players union agree on 5 year extension for 'Madden' video game

    NFL, players union agree on 5 year extension for 'Madden' video game

    Good news, Madden fans: you can officially continue spending $80 to complain about how the game hasn't been good in years. 

    According to Darren Rovell, the NFL and EA Sports have agreed to a 5-year extension: 

    Rovell says his sources have told him that, 'the deal is worth at least $1 billion to the NFL and $500 million to the players. The deal also includes at least $500 million in marketing commitments over the years.' 

    Congrats to everyone involved! Now more than ever, football fans need some good news. There's no tradition as timeless as throwing controllers through TVs and against walls when your friend runs four verticals with a Y skinny post over and over and over again. Madden exists solely to allow people cover to yell at the TV without the presence of, like, a real reason. What would we do without it?