Bears

With a year of experience, Mitchell Trubisky trying to master Matt Nagy’s offense in Year 2

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USA TODAY

With a year of experience, Mitchell Trubisky trying to master Matt Nagy’s offense in Year 2

Mitchell Trubisky already has 27 NFL starts in his young career, but he had a different offense in each of his first two seasons.

Heading into his third year with the Bears, Trubisky finally entered an offseason with some stability as far as offensive system. In an interview with Pro Football Talk, Trubisky said that is making a big difference.

“We’re already so much further than we were last year at this time, having the same offense, going through Year 2,” Trubisky said. “It feels like you can just really get on top of this offense, master it, and just go through all the details. We know what we’re good at, we know what we want to work at and we’re just way more focused on what we want this offense to be.”

The Bears traded away Jordan Howard while adding running back Mike Davis and wide receiver Cordarrelle Patterson via free agency and drafting running back David Montgomery, but most of the key playmakers remain from last season. That adds further consistency from a year ago.

“It’s made this transition going into Year 3 so much easier, going into Year 2 of this offense,” Trubisky said. “Just knowing everyone who we have playmaker-wise, knowing your teammates all across the board. We didn’t add a bunch of new guys besides the rookies we just drafted. We’ll get them in. We just have great chemistry between the players on offense and our coaches and what we’re trying to do scheme-wise. We’re just so much further from where we’re at. I’m very excited from where this offense can be this year.”

Will that lead to a more productive offense in 2019? That remains to be seen, but Trubisky thinks the team could have won more games last season as it was.

“I think all those expectations that we overachieved were external,” he said. “We knew what we had in the locker room and we knew how many games we could win. We felt like every week we were in it. We felt like we should have won more games than we did last year.”

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Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

It seems like an annual talking point at this time in the offseason: Bears nose tackle Eddie Goldman is one of the best yet most underrated players in Chicago. His performance in 2019 continued that career narrative. 

Goldman finished the year making 15 starts with 29 tackles and one sack. He earned the eighth-highest Pro Football Focus grade among all Bears defenders and remained the consistent run-stopping force in the center of Chicago’s defensive line. 

To be fair, Goldman wasn’t as dominant as he was in 2018, when his 89.1 PFF grade was one of the best at his position in the NFL. But in terms of his role with the Bears, he’s irreplaceable. 

Goldman is entering the third year of a four-year, $42 million contract and will quickly become a source of contract negotiations once again. If he has another strong season in 2020, GM Ryan Pace will have little choice but to lock him up on another extension. Sure, that seems like it’s way down the road, but big-time defensive linemen get paid big-time contracts; Pace has to be prepared. There are currently six defensive tackles making at least $14 million per season.

Quality nose tackles are hard to find. They don’t fill up the stat sheet and rarely do they ever become league-wide superstars; but the Bears’ defense simply wouldn’t possess the upside it does without Goldman anchoring the defensive line, and that remained true in 2019.

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

Bears Season in Review: Eddie Goldman

It seems like an annual talking point at this time in the offseason: Bears nose tackle Eddie Goldman is one of the best yet most underrated players in Chicago. His performance in 2019 continued that career narrative. 

Goldman finished the year making 15 starts with 29 tackles and one sack. He earned the eighth-highest Pro Football Focus grade among all Bears defenders and remained the consistent run-stopping force in the center of Chicago’s defensive line. 

To be fair, Goldman wasn’t as dominant as he was in 2018, when his 89.1 PFF grade was one of the best at his position in the NFL. But in terms of his role with the Bears, he’s irreplaceable. 

Goldman is entering the third year of a four-year, $42 million contract and will quickly become a source of contract negotiations once again. If he has another strong season in 2020, GM Ryan Pace will have little choice but to lock him up on another extension. Sure, that seems like it’s way down the road, but big-time defensive linemen get paid big-time contracts; Pace has to be prepared. There are currently six defensive tackles making at least $14 million per season.

Quality nose tackles are hard to find. They don’t fill up the stat sheet and rarely do they ever become league-wide superstars; but the Bears’ defense simply wouldn’t possess the upside it does without Goldman anchoring the defensive line, and that remained true in 2019.