Cubs

Big changes coming for the Packers

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Big changes coming for the Packers

From Comcast SportsNetGREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) -- One by one, Greg Jennings took down the photos of his wife and children that lined his locker, careful not to rip them as he removed the tape. Below him, two plastic bins were filled with shampoo, lotion, toothpaste and deodorant.Still numb from the rout in San Francisco that ended their trying season, the Green Bay Packers headed into an offseason sure to bring change -- some of it big. Jennings and Donald Driver, key parts of the team that won the Super Bowl two years ago, are all but gone, and Charles Woodson may have played his last game for Green Bay."At the end of the day, you know the Packers are going to do what's best for the Packers. And that's not going to change whether you're No. 4, No. 80, No. 85, No. 77. That's going to be the case," Jennings said Sunday, referring to Brett Favre, Driver and Cullen Jenkins, as well as himself. "And as the other half of the businessman sitting down at that table, I have to do what's best for myself and my family."Jennings finished with career lows in receptions (36), yards per catch (10.2) and total yards (366) after missing half of season with a torn muscle in his groin. He remains Aaron Rodgers' favorite target, however, and he reminded everyone why with one big catch after another when he returned from the injury. He led Green Bay with six catches and a score in Saturday night's 45-31 loss to San Francisco in an NFC divisional game.But the Packers have perhaps the deepest receiving corps in the NFL, and breakout seasons by James Jones and Randall Cobb have made Jennings, an unrestricted free agent, expendable."Everybody in this locker room is trying to win Super Bowls, but everybody in this locker room is trying to take care of their family as well," Jones said. "Football is our job and football is how we do it, and we understand that we've got four or five No. 1 receivers that are going to want money at some time. So we know it's going to be hard for this organization to pay everybody what they want, which (stinks) ... because I wish we could stay together for the rest of our career and go on a run and win some Super Bowls."Driver is Green Bay's all-time leading receiver, and is adored by fans. But he will be 38 next month, and had only a bit role in the offense after restructuring the final year of his contract. His eight catches for 77 yards were his lowest totals since his rookie season, and he was inactive for four games, including the NFC wild-card, possibly his final game at Lambeau Field.Driver would like to play until he's 40, and thinks he can still help a team. But he said he'll talk with his wife and children before making any decisions on his future."If (Saturday) is my last game, then it was a true honor just to put that uniform on once again," said Driver, who played on special teams Saturday. "I wore that uniform for a long time and it's truly a blessing to be wearing the green and gold."Woodson, linebacker A.J. Hawk and big tight end Jermichael Finley are all under contract for next year. But they're all due raises, too, and the Packers have to begin making tough decisions because they need to lock up long-term deals with Jones, Clay Matthews and B.J. Raji. The three, considered cornerstones of the franchise, all will be free agents after next season.Woodson, the 2009 defensive player of the year, is one of the most-respected players in the Packers locker room -- by players and coaches alike -- and he's still disruptive. But he turned 36 in October and missed nine games with a broken right collarbone, the same one he broke in the Super Bowl. Youngsters Casey Hayward and M.D. Jennings made big impressions this season, and the Packers may decide they're enough to make up for Woodson's absence.The Packers were repeatedly torched by Colin Kaepernick and the 49ers, and Hawk looked particularly overmatched.Then there's Finley. He set a franchise record for receptions by a tight end this year, and few Packers were better down the stretch. But he's mercurial, and general manager Ted Thompson may decide he's not worth the big bump in payroll."We just finished losing, man," Finley said. "Hopefully I'm here forever. I'm good for next year, as far as I know."Regardless of what the roster looks like, the Packers have to find a way to finish better next year. This was the second straight year they were bounced out in the divisional round, and neither game was close.In fact, finishing was a season-long problem for Green Bay. The Packers fell to 2-3 after blowing an 18-point halftime lead at Indianapolis. They also struggled to put away less-than-mediocre teams like New Orleans, Jacksonville and Detroit. After securing the No. 2 seed with a rout of Tennessee, the Packers gave it up to San Francisco by losing to Minnesota in the regular-season finale.And after Mason Crosby's 31-yard field goal midway through the third quarter tied Saturday's game at 24, the 49ers steamrolled the Packers, scoring three straight touchdowns."We didn't finish. That's the bottom line, we didn't finish," Jones said. "We had a chance to do something great and get back to the Super Bowl. (But) we didn't finish our season strong. So got to start all over."NOTES:RB Cedric Benson, who played only five games before a season-ending foot injury, hopes to return next year. "Absolutely. I don't have a preference to be anywhere else," he said. "This is what I know and I'm excited about winning Super Bowls, too, and everybody around here is as well." ... RT Bryan Bulaga, who suffered a season-ending hip injury Nov. 4, expects to be ready for next season. "It's a little bit far out in advance to tell what I'm going to be doing, but I'm pretty confident training camp is a good goal."

Kris Bryant's injury looms large as Cubs finish home stand in underwhelming fashion

Kris Bryant's injury looms large as Cubs finish home stand in underwhelming fashion

There are 162 baseball games in a season and some days, you’re just not going to have it. On Sunday afternoon, in a 10-2 loss to the Reds, the Cubs just didn’t have it. 

“It’s already in the trash can...” Maddon said. “... so let’s flush it out and move on.” 

Things were bleak from the very first at-bat of the game, when Kyle Schwarber took a 3-2 fastball looking for one of his three strikeouts on the day. Anthony Rizzo was the only starter not to strike out at least once, as the Cubs’ finished with 11. Reds starter Tanner Roark was responsible for 9 of them, his season-high. 

Things weren’t much better on the basepaths or in the field. Besides making two errors, Anthony Rizzo was thrown out at the plate in the 2nd inning and David Bote got doubled-up at first after drawing a walk in the 6th. The Cubs were playing playing their 13th game in 13 days, and it showed.

“I feel really good about how we’ve been playing until today,” Maddon said. “This whole month we’ve been in almost every game except for this one, and maybe the [7-0 loss on May 10th] against Milwaukee. There’s not a whole lot to be upset about, and I’m not. I just want to make sure everyone’s well moving forward.” 

There was a scary moment in the 6th inning, as Kris Bryant and Jason Heyward collided in the right field gap while trying to make a play on a fly ball from Eugenio Suarez. Bryant was slow to get up and eventually had to leave the game. He’s still being evaluated for a head/neck injury, and the Cubs don’t yet know if he’ll go into concussion protocol. For what it's worth, Bryant was cleared to fly with the team. 

“He’s doing okay,” he said. “He’s still under evaluation. We don’t know exactly what we’re doing with this whole thing yet, but we’re trying to talk with the doctors and find out exactly where we’re at.”

“We collided, and I called for the ball,” Heyward added. “We were both going hard to make a play and ran into each other.”

The loss dropped starter Jose Quintana to 4-4 on the season. Quintana went 5.1 innings while allowing six runs on 12 hits with one walk and two strikeouts. Despite relatively weak contact, the Reds hit well all weekend. Their 42 hits over three games was the most for them in a three-game series at Wrigley since 1976, and they finished the weekend with a .404 BABIP. 

“Yeah, I just had to keep pitching, you know?” Quintana said. “Keeping my focus. It was really tough - too many base hits. In some contests that happens. I just try to stay close in the game.” 

The Cubs finished their 7-game homestand at 3-4, and now hit the road for a two-city trip. Up first comes the 35-19 Astros, who are 20-7 at home. This season Houston ranks first in on-base percentage, second in slugging percentage, and third in home runs. Their closer, Ryan Pressley, has the lowest ERA of all qualified relievers and is fresh off a streak of 40 straight scoreless appearances.

“I’m excited,” Joe Maddon said before Sunday’s game. “Let’s get by today, but I’m excited for the whole week. Look at our schedule - it’s been pretty firm, and it continues to be pretty firm. And that’s the way it should be. I’m looking forward to it.” 

Kris Bryant leaves Sunday's game after outfield collision with Jason Heyward

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Scott Chagnon/NBC Sports Chicago

Kris Bryant leaves Sunday's game after outfield collision with Jason Heyward

Add injury to insult for the Cubs. 

In the top of the 6th inning, with the Cubs already down 6 runs, right fielder Kris Bryant left the game after colliding with Jason Heyward in the outfield.

You can check out the video right here. 

It's possible that the move was simply precautionary. The Cubs are on their 13th game in 13 days, and being down six runs in the latter half of a getaway game isn't the time to roll the dice. That said, Bryant missing time would be a significant blow, as the Cubs' star is in the midst of a stellar season. Through 49 games, Bryant's slashing .288/.411/.576 with a .987 and a 160 wRC+. As of Sunday afternoon, only Javy Baez has a higher WAR (2.5) than Bryant (2.4). 

There's been no further announcement on the extent of Bryant's injury.