Bears

Big Ten recruiting class rankings

Big Ten recruiting class rankings

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011
3:38 p.m.

By Mike Clark
YourSeason.com

1. Ohio State: Don't expect the Buckeyes to fall from their perch atop the conference anytime soon. They have one of the top five classes nationally, one which mines Ohio's rich vein of prep talent but also includes three players from Florida and two from Illinois: Fremd OL Brian Bobek and Vernon Hills WR Evan Spencer.

2. Nebraska: The Cornhuskers are still focusing on their traditional base in the Big 12 region, with five players from Texas. But with their impending move to the Big Ten, they're also making inroads into the Midwest with Sacred Heart-Griffin OL Ryan Klachko from Illinois and a couple players from Ohio.
3. Iowa: Coach Kirk Ferentz went far and wide for this deep, talented class, targeting Texas, the East Coast and Illinois among others. The group includes Glenbard West OL Jordan Walsh and Thornridge RB Mikail McCall along with Edwardsville's multi-talented Rodney Coe.

4. Michigan: New coach Brady Hoke hit the ground running and snagged one prominent late commitment from Simeon OL Chris Bryant. The rest of the class leans heavily on players from Michigan and Ohio, including one of the nation's premier all-purpose backs: Justice Hayes of Grand Blanc, Mich.

5. Michigan State: Like their state rival, the Spartans put together a class heavy on players from Michigan and Ohio, though Canada and New Mexico also are represented. Hinsdale Central OL Jack Allen was an early commit.

6. Penn State: One of the conference's smaller recruiting classes is heavy on linemen, especially on the defensive side. The Nittany Lions didn't target the Chicago area this year; the closest they have to an area recruit is kicker Sam Ficken from Valparaiso, Ind.
7. Illinois: Probably no school had a bigger improvement from last year to this year than the Illini. They were aggressive in the Chicago area and came away with a strong group led by Sun-Times Player of the Year Reilly O'Toole, the Wheaton Warrenville South QB. But the talent doesn't end there: keep an eye on DB Dondi Kirby from Monroeville, Pa., Gateway and 5-11, 215-pound RB Donovonn Young from Katy, Texas.
8. Wisconsin: The Badgers stayed close to home, getting commitments from eight Wisconsin players, and dipped into the seemingly endless talent pool in Ohio. They also picked up one of the Public League's rising stars in Curie DE James Adeyanju.

9. Northwestern: Though the Wildcats' academics allow them to recruit nationally with commitments from California to Texas to New Jersey, they paid plenty of attention to their own backyard. Richards' versatile Jarrell Williams and Ols Matt Frazier of Bishop McNamara and Jack Konopka of Fremd lead the local list.

10. Indiana: New coach Kevin Wilson landed one of the nation's top linebackers in Zack Shaw of Coshocton, Ohio. Prospect OL Peyton Eckert is the Hoosiers' lone Chicago-area signee.

11. Minnesota: The Gophers lost Naperville North TE Matt LaCosse to Illinois after the firing of coach Tim Brewster, but kept twin brothers Kyle and Luke McAvoy, a pair of offensive linemen from Bloomington.

12. Purdue: It's been a rough spell for the Boilermakers, with just 13 wins in the past three seasons, and the conference's smallest recruiting class may not offer a lot of help. Purdue did grab one of the leaders of Homewood-Flossmoor's 2010 turnaround in 6-4, 300-pound defensive tackle Michael Rouse III.

The Bears are getting a different type of nickel cornerback in Buster Skrine

3-11busterskrine.jpg
USA Today

The Bears are getting a different type of nickel cornerback in Buster Skrine

When the Bears’ defense takes the field against Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers on Opening Night, they’ll be returning 9 of the 11 starters that were part of a 2018 squad that was one of the best in Bears’ history. 

One of the few new faces that figure to be among the starting 11 is cornerback Buster Skrine. Gone is Bryce Callahan, who left for Vic Fangio’s Denver team after spending the first four years of his career in Chicago. Though Bears’ scouts have had their eye on Skrine for a few seasons now, it was his more palatable three-year, $16.5 million contract -- compared to Callahan’s three-year, $21 million contract -- that finally got him in house. 

“Me and Buster came out the exact same year, and I’ve watched him,” Prince Amukamara said after OTAs on Wednesday afternoon. “He actually played with my best friend and he would always talk about how fast Buster is -- especially when Buster played gunner. 

“I’ve always watched him, and I feel like he’s very similar to Bryce [Callahan] by being quick and being active. I’m definitely happy with the pick up.” 

Once considered a spot to place the third-best, less-athletic cornerback, no position has seen it's value increase so dramatically over the last decade. Offenses are changing dramatically; no team saw more three receiver sets in 2018 than the Bears’ defense. Per Sharp Stats, opposing offenses lined up in 11 personnel against Chicago 78% of the time. The next closest was the Chiefs at 71%, and the NFL average is 65%. 

“I think nickel is a different ball game,” Amukamara added. “I would say it can be one of the hardest positions on the field, just because you’re on an island, but the receiver has so much room to work with. Plus, it’s a lot of mental gymnastics, so you’ve got to know when you’re blitzing, know when you’re running, and so we put a lot on our nickel.” 

Despite not being considered part of a what teams have traditionally considered base defense, the pass-happy nature of this era in the NFL has all but mandated that nickel corners are on the field for most of the defensive snaps. It’s no coincidence that before breaking his foot against the Rams in Week 12, Callahan was on pace to set a career-high in snap percentage. 

“Nowadays, you see a lot more sub packages,” Bears defensive backs coach Deshea Townsend said. “You’re probably playing 70% in sub during a game now… Otherwise, it hasn’t really changed - he just plays more. That’s the thing - he is technically a starter. He’s probably going to run on the field first in a lot of games, and by rule that’s a starter.

“One thing about the nickel position is that you’ve got to do a little bit of both. You can’t just go out on 3rd down and cover and run the option routes. Now they’re going to hand off the ball and find out where you’re at and you’re going to have to make a tackle. That’s the difference in the position now - it’s a first and second down type of guy that has to be able to do it all.”

While Skrine isn’t considered as good a cover corner as Callahan, Skrine’s pass rush and run defense looks pretty similar. Per Pro Football Focus, Skrine’s run defense graded out significantly higher (80.7) than Callahan’s (57.8). 

“With Buster, it’s about his playing experience,” Townsend added. “He’s a guy who will mix it up in the run. He can blitz, and he’s reliable. He’s tough.”

Cubs taking care to make sure Pedro Strop's hamstring issues are behind him

Cubs taking care to make sure Pedro Strop's hamstring issues are behind him

Pedro Strop said he feels "ready" in his return from a hamstring injury, but he and the Cubs aren't going to rush it.

The veteran reliever has missed most of May with the injury, but threw 25-pitch bullpens on both Monday and Wednesday and has reported zero issues. He said it's been more than a week since he last felt pain in the area.

But considering this is Strop's third hamstring injury in the last eight months, the Cubs want to be extra cautious to make sure this will not happen again.

Plus, there's no point in rushing him back right now, even with the bullpen struggling. The Cubs would certainly welcome Strop back to the active roster immediately, but he's going to be a huge key for them down the stretch and they need to ensure he's healthy for that.

"I think we're just being overly cautious because we don't want this to happen again," Joe Maddon said. 

But how can Cubs avoid another hamstring injury with the soon-to-be-34-year-old? 

"We're building strength, we're working hard to make it stronger instead of just, 'Oh, it's OK and pain-free, let's go out there and have the same thing happen again,'" Strop said. "We're just taking care."

He missed the final two weeks of the regular season last year and pitched through "severe pain" in the National League wild-card game after first hurting his hamstring in Washington D.C. He then missed time in spring training with an issue in the other leg.

The injuries are not all directly related, but hamstrings are tricky by nature.

"That's a hammy, man. When you mess up with those things, they keep reminding you that they're there," Maddon said. "He has to continue to be proactive with the work in between and our guys in the back there do a wonderful job rehabbing and strengthening. 

"I think some guys are just predetermined to do those kinds of things and it really stinks. But it happens. So our next best thing is to create that program that hopefully prevents it from happening again. 

"In the meantime, just really monitoring him and not pushing him too hard, etc. But hamstrings are hamstrings, man. They're just no fun. Once you pull them once, there's a chance to do it again."

Strop said he will throw another bullpen Saturday and doesn't believe he needs a rehab stint. Because this was a leg injury, he's been able to continue throwing throughout the recovery process and keep his arm strength up.

If Strop continues to report well and doesn't go on a rehab assignment, we could possibly see him back in the Cubs bullpen early next week, which would be a welcome sign for a unit that has suddenly run into some tough sledding of late.

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