Big Ten

Big Ten

Devin Davis hasn't played a basketball game for Indiana since March of 2014, but he's gone through a whole heck of a lot since.

Tuesday, Davis was suspended indefinitely from all team activities after he was cited for marijuana possession in his dorm room.

This follows the frightening events of last fall, when Davis sustained a serious injury after being struck by a car he had exited, an injury that knocked him out for the entirety of the 2014-15 season and kept him in hospitals for several months.

Indiana released the following statement on Tuesday, which also mentions that Davis' teammate Hanner Mosquera-Perea was in the dorm room with Davis, though he was not cited. Neither player was arrested.

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"We have been made aware that Indiana sophomore Devin Davis was cited by IUPD for possession of marijuana in an IU dormitory room last evening," the statement read. "Effective immediately, Davis has been suspended from all team activities. Any additional action related to Davis' status will occur after further review of this matter. We understand that junior Hanner Mosquera-Perea was present at the time of the incident but was not charged by IUPD. Mosquera-Perea's role, if any, will also be reviewed as part of this matter."

While this is hardly something as serious as the accident involving Davis last fall — the car was being driven by teammate Emmitt Holt, who had been drinking — it's just the latest in a string of off-the-court incidents for members of the program.

 

Prior to Davis' accident last year, Mosquera-Perea was arrested for operating a vehicle while intoxicated, and Yogi Ferrell and Stanford Robinson (the latter of which is no longer with the team) were cited for minor consumption and possession of false identification.

Though other programs have far more serious off-the-court issues, many Indiana fans cite this string of incidents as an example of a poor job being done by head coach Tom Crean.