Big Ten

Led by 11 Michigan Wolverines, here's a complete list of Big Ten players taken in NFL Draft

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USA TODAY

Led by 11 Michigan Wolverines, here's a complete list of Big Ten players taken in NFL Draft

The 2017 NFL Draft is in the books, and as is usually the case each year, the Big Ten was once more well represented.

No school had more players picked than Michigan, which saw a program-record 11 players selected by NFL teams.

Ohio State players also made frequent appearances, with seven of them chosen.

Northwestern had two players picked for the third straight draft, while Illinois sent yet another defensive lineman to the pros, the sixth since 2011.

Here's a complete list of the 35 Big Ten products taken in this year's draft.

First round

11. Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State, New Orleans Saints
15. Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State, Indianapolis Colts
24. Gareon Conley, CB, Ohio State, Oakland Raiders
25. Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan, Cleveland Browns
28. Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan, Dallas Cowboys
30. T.J. Watt, LB, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh Steelers
32. Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin, New Orleans Saints

Second round

35. Malik McDowell, DT, Michigan State, Seattle Seahawks
40. Curtis Samuel, WR, Ohio State, Carolina Panthers
54. Raekwon McMillan, LB, Ohio State, Miami Dolphins

Third round

68. Dawuane Smoot, DE, Illinois, Jacksonville Jaguars
70. Pat Elflein, C, Ohio State, Minnesota Vikings
71. Dan Feeney, OG, Indiana, Los Angeles Chargers
74. Chris Wormley, DE, Michigan, Baltimore Ravens
84. Chris Godwin, WR, Penn State, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
92. Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan, Dallas Cowboys
95. Delano Hill, S, Michigan, Seattle Seahawks
104. C.J. Beathard, QB, Iowa, San Francisco 49ers
106. Amara Darboh, WR, Michigan, Seattle Seahawks

Fourth round

108. Vince Biedel, LB, Wisconsin, Green Bay Packers
109. Jaleel Johnson, DT, Iowa, Minnesota Vikings
120. Ben Gideon, LB, Michigan, Minnesota Vikings
123. Montae Nicholson, S, Michigan State, Washington Redskins
138. Ryan Glasgow, DT, Michigan, Cincinnati Bengals
139. Jehu Chesson, WR, Michigan, Kansas City Chiefs

Fifth round

145. Jake Butt, TE, Michigan, Denver Broncos
146. George Kittle, TE, Iowa, San Francisco 49ers
151. Desmond King, CB, Iowa, Los Angeles Chargers
161. Anthony Walker Jr., LB, Northwestern, Indianapolis Colts
175. DeAngelo Yancey, WR, Purdue, Green Bay Packers
184. Nate Gerry, S, Nebraska, Philadelphia Eagles

Sixth round

197. Jeremy Clark, CB, Michigan, New York Jets

Seventh round

220. Ifeadi Odenigbo, DE, Northwestern, Minnesota Vikings
222. Jalen Myrick, CB, Minnesota, Jacksonville Jaguars
239. Noah Brown, WR, Ohio State, Dallas Cowboys

Northwestern Wildcats pause football workouts after positive COVID-19 test

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USA Today

Northwestern Wildcats pause football workouts after positive COVID-19 test

The Northwestern Wildcats have stopped football workouts due to a player testing positive for COVID-19. A university spokesperson says, the school is now undergoing “rigorous contact tracing and quarantine protocols to protect the health and safety of student-athletes, coaches and staff.”

Some student-athletes have already been placed in quarantine, according to the Chicago Tribune.

The earliest any football activities can resume for the Wildcats is Wednesday, according to the university spokesperson.

Michigan State required their entire football team to go into quarantine in late July after several positive tests among players and staff.

In addition, the Big Ten announced they will play a conference-only schedule in 2020, if they’re able to play at all.


RELATED: Northwestern football will not host Wisconsin Badgers at Wrigley Field

Lou Henson, former Illinois Fighting Illini basketball coach, dies at 88

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Lou Henson, former Illinois Fighting Illini basketball coach, dies at 88

Hall of Fame former Fighting Illini head basketball coach Lou Henson died last Saturday. He was 88 years old.

Henson was the all-time wins leader at the University of Illinois, guiding the team to a 423-224 record from 1975-1996. That included a 214-164 record in Big Ten Conference play, and one Big Ten conference title in 1984.

He also led the Illini to 12 NCAA tournament appearances, the highlight being a Final Four berth with the 1988-89 “Flying Illini.”

"Our Orange and Blue hearts are heavy," said Josh Whitman, Illinois Director of Athletics, in a statement. "We have lost an Illini icon. We have lost a role model, a friend, and a leader. We have lost our coach.

“Coach Henson may be gone, but the memories he provided us, and the legacy he created, will last forever. He was responsible for almost 800 wins in the record book and countless Fighting Illini moments frozen in time, but Coach Henson's true measure will be felt in the lives he touched – the lives of his former players, people on this campus, and friends in our broader community.

“We are all better for whatever time we were privileged to spend with Coach Lou, whether it was five minutes or 50 years. He made everyone feel like a friend. I so enjoyed my time with Coach these last five years, and I will miss him. Our thoughts and prayers are with Mary, Lisa, Lori, Leigh Anne, and the entire Henson family. Their family will always be part of ours."

In addition to his iconic career at the University of Illinois, Henson coached at New Mexico State where he compiled another 289 victories, from 1966-1975 and 1997-2005. Henson is the wins leader at New Mexico State, as well.

His 779 career wins rank 28th all-time in NCAA history. He was inducted into the National Collegiate Hall of Fame in 2015. The same year, the newly renovated court at Illinois was renamed “Lou Henson Court.” The basketball court at New Mexico State is named “Lou Henson Court,” as well.

“He really was ahead of the game, in terms of bringing fan interaction and fan connection to a program,” said Stephen Bardo, one of Henson’s former players in a video on Twitter. “For me, Lou Henson’s voice got louder the longer after I left school. The more of an adult I became, the older my kids became, I would hear coach Henson’s voice more. I would impart the lessons I learned from him onto my children.

“He had an enormous impact on my life.”


RELATED: Big Ten to play conference-only NCAA football schedule 'if able'


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