Blackhawks

2010 Hawks Rewind: 3 things we noticed in Blackhawks' Game 2 win over Canucks

2010 Hawks Rewind: 3 things we noticed in Blackhawks' Game 2 win over Canucks

In honor of the 10-year anniversary of the 2010 Stanley Cup team, NBC Sports Chicago is re-airing each of the Blackhawks' 16 postseason wins from the run that ended a 49-year championship drought. You can join the conversation using #HawksRewind on social media.

After being routed 5-1 in Game 1 at home, the Blackhawks bounced back with a 4-2 win over the Canucks in Game 2 to even the series at 1-1 going to Vancouver in the Western Conference semifinals. Here are three things we noticed in the win:

1. A multi-goal comeback to avoid a significant hole

At the top of the broadcast, Pat Foley called Game 2 "virtually" a must-win for the Blackhawks and it was hard to disagree at the time. A loss would have meant heading to Vancouver down 2-0 in the series against a Canucks team that was 30-8-3 at home in the regular season.

And the Blackhawks sure came close to finding themselves in that situation. The Canucks flew out of the gates by scoring the first two goals in the opening 5:02 of the game and at one point were outshooting the Blackhawks 9-1.

Fortunately for the home team, Brent Seabrook scored 2:38 after Vancouver's second goal and it helped calm the nerves on the bench. From there, the Blackhawks took control and scored four unanswered, the second of which was a shorthanded goal by Patrick Sharp that ignited the third-period comeback.

It's crazy to think how close the Blackhawks came from falling into a 2-0 hole.

2. Brent Seabrook was a beast

Seabrook has been a major factor in many key playoff games for the Blackhawks, scoring several big goals throughout his career. But this was one of his most impactful postseason performances.

Seabrook scored a goal, added two assists, registered five shot attempts (two on goal), a game-high eight hits and one blocked shot in 23:38 of ice time. At even strength, he was on the ice for 27 shot attempts for and 15 against, 16 scoring chances for and eight against, five high-danger chances for and three against, and three goals for and zero against, according to Natural Stat Trick.

No. 7 was an absolute force.

3. The line that stayed the same delivers

Head coach Joel Quenneville spruced up the lines in Game 2 after a tough showing in Game 1. But one line he didn't touch was Dave Bolland, Andrew Ladd, and Kris Versteeg. And it paid off.

The trio was on the ice for 7:49 at even strength and recorded 14 shot attempts for to only four against, nine scoring chances for to four against and two goals for to zero against. The three of them were dynamite all game long.

Most notably, Versteeg scored the go-ahead goal with 1:30 left in regulation and it turned out to be the game-winner, with Patrick Kane scoring an empty-net goal to seal the deal. It remains one of the biggest goals Versteeg has scored in his postseason career.

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Dave Bolland made another monumental play in 2013 playoffs before '17 Seconds'

Dave Bolland made another monumental play in 2013 playoffs before '17 Seconds'

Former Blackhawks forward and two-time Stanley Cup champion Dave Bolland is mostly remembered for the '17 Seconds' in which Bryan Bickell and he each scored with under 1:16 left in regulation to take a 3-2 lead and win the Stanley Cup in 2013's Game 6 of the Final against the Boston Bruins. 

Another remarkable play made by Bolland can be seen on NBC Sports Chicago's "Hawks Rewind" of Game 7 of the 2013 Western Conference Semifinals against the Detroit Red Wings on Monday at 4 p.m.

The Hawks had climbed back after being down 3-1 in the series, due to three straight losses, to force a game seven at the United Center. It was the last year the longtime rivals would be in the same conference. 

With 1:47 remaining in regulation, a Niklas Hjalmarsson goal, that would have given Chicago a 2-1 lead, was disallowed due to controversial roughing penalties behind the play for Brandon Saad and Wings defenseman Kyle Quincey. 

Things were looking grim for the Hawks, who had valiantly battled their way back, seemingly only to be cheated out of a victory they earned. Saad had been launched into the Wings' bench and picked up and thrown down to the ice by Quincey. The Hawks rookie forward received his roughing penalty for retaliating by barely swatting at Quincey from his back. The game should have been over.

Everyone remembers what came next: Brent Seabrook's beautiful overtime goal to propel the Hawks through the rest of the postseason and his yell to the UC rafters while being mobbed by his teammates after the fact.

Seeing the determination and fight that the Blackhawks had against insurmountable odds and the way they pulled out one of the most memorable goals and wins in team history, it was hard not to feel that the Cup was theirs already at this point, unless you were a member of the team that still had a lot of work to do.

"You can't really sit there and say, 'We're going to win this,'" Bolland said over the phone. "The Stanley Cup is a tough trophy to win, it has to be the hardest trophy to win out there. But we had a great team that year. I think we had a lot of leadership through Seabs and Tazer and Kaner. All the guys that went through 2010, we knew what it felt like. When you get that first feeling of hoisting it, you want to do it over and over and over again."

What fans may not remember is that Bolland unequivocally made a play to get Seabrook the puck and without him, one of the greatest goals in franchise history never happens. There's no certainty the Hawks would have won Game 7 without the OT sequence that unfolded either.

"That Game 7 against Detroit was a big game," Bolland said. "I know I went and hit (Gustav) Nyquist and Seabsy picked up the puck and had a great shot and put it in the back of the net for the 'W'."

"Hit" is phrasing it modestly. Bolland pulverized Nyquist, with a clean crunch sending him into the boards and down to the ice. The puck Nyquist was carrying found Seabrook, who skated it into the offensive zone and placed a wrist shot perfectly over Jimmy Howard's glove from the high slot 3:35 into overtime. 

Bolland was justly credited with an assist for his efforts. 

The play he made set the table for the goal that saved the Hawks' 2013 postseason life and gave them momentum and confidence they'd ride the rest of the way. 

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Ever wonder how "Chelsea Dagger" became the Blackhawks' goal song?

Ever wonder how "Chelsea Dagger" became the Blackhawks' goal song?

Ever wonder how "Chelsea Dagger" became the Blackhawks' goal song?

If you've been to just one Hawks game in the past decade, the team's goal song — the Fratellis' "Chelsea Dagger" — is still probably on repeat in your head.

Not only is it a catchy tune, but it's become synonymous with the Blackhawks' renaissance and decade of dominance. For the vast majority of the past 10 years, when Patrick Kane, Jonathan Toews and other already legendary Hawks were having big nights and playoff series were being won, you were hearing the "do do do do do do" chorus. 

In a Zoom conference call interview with NBC Sports Chicago, former Blackhawks intern Matthew Benjamin said he would work the song into the rotation during 2008-09 preseason games when he was controlling the music. 

"They were trying to do some other songs, and pretty much right from the get-go, give them a lot of credit for trusting me to run the music and trusting an intern basically three or four months out of undergrad, working for an Original Six team to try this out," said Benjamin, a diehard and lifelong Detroit Red Wings fan whose car with a license plate reading "WingsIn7" could be spotted in the UC employee parking lot while he was helping write Blackhawks history.

Benjamin had been playing the song for Hawks employees around the office before getting a crack at playing tunes for games.

Former president of the Blackhawks John McDonough and executive vice president — still with the team — Jay Blunk were at Madison Square Garden to see the Hawks take on the Rangers for the 08-09 season opener and came to the realization that the organization may need one standalone goal song after hearing the same one repeated in New York four times.

According to NBC Sports Chicago Blackhawks pre and postgame host Pat Boyle, prior to 08-09 the Hawks mostly played Joe Satriani's "Crowd Chant" and had individual songs for players like Jonathan Toews ("Johnny B. Goode"), Patrick Kane ("Rock You Like a Hurricane") and Patrick Sharp ("Sharp Dressed Man"). 

McDonough and Blunk polled Blackhawks headquarters and the overwhelming majority determined a lone goal song was needed.

Due to Matthew's persistence, the song made it into Pete Hassen and Ben Broder of the marketing department's top three. It was worked into games more and more, along with a Fall Out Boy and Gwen Stefani number. 

The Madhouse on Madison responded the most to the Fratellis' jam and the rest is history.

"When you see something . . . the work, the time you put into it and you see it kind of come together, you see other people enjoying it, it's a nice thing," Benjamin said.

As he told his story, there seemed to be some relief and closure for Matthew, who spoke very highly of his time with the Hawks, for finally receiving some acknowledgement in helping provide the theme song for the golden age of Blackhawks hockey.

"This is something that I've known that I've been a part of. I've told some people [but] it's pretty hard for anybody to believe me, It's not like there's a lot of proof," he said.

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