Cubs

Blogs with Balls returns to Chicago for annual event

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Blogs with Balls returns to Chicago for annual event

Blogs with Balls, an annual summit featuring sports bloggers and mainstream media members, will kickoff its event on Wednesday in Chicago, returning to the Windy City for the first time since 2010. 

"This is the 3rd time BWB is holding an event in Chicago,” said Don Povia, Co-Founder, Blogs With Balls and Managing Partner, Transition Sports & Entertainment. “There are very few sports towns that match the Windy City's passion for its teams. BWB is truly a community-based event - both from a topical and geographical standpoint - and we are fortunate to have been embraced by locally by those communities, none as much as the team at Comcast SportsNet Chicago. From contributions of its personalities (including Dave Kaplan this year) and staff, our success in Chicago can be directly attributed to CSN Chicago's continued support."

“Blogs With Balls continues to make a positive impact in their leadership in the sports new media area in bringing together fantastic thought leaders for engaging and relevant conversations,” said T.K. Gore, Senior Director, Digital of Comcast SportsNet Chicago. “We are thrilled to partner with #BWB6 to help bring the Chicago sports community together plus showcase and distribute the quality content via this year’s strong lineup of panelists and speakers.”

The event will be held at First Ward Events (2033 West North Ave) from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tickets are still on sale for the public and can be purchased here.

Here's a list of the panels and speakers scheduled for the #BWB6 event. You can find a full description of each panel here:

Measuring Online Influence

9:45 -10:15am

• JR Jackson, JR Sport Brief
• Brandon Williams, Ketchum Sports & Entertainment
• Kyle Nelson, MVP Index

Athletes off the Field

10:15-10:45am

• Keith Bulluck, NFL; Managing Partner – Transition Sports & Entertainment
• Tim Ryan, Writer/Humorist/Fashion Critic
• Matt Sebek,  Founder – JoeSportsFan.com, RookiesApp.com & CastApp.co
• Mike Dolan,  Athletes Quarterly
• Shawn Smith,  XAM Sports

Like, Follow, Swipe Right: How the NBA is Connecting with Fans in the Modern Era

10:45 – 11:25am

• Zach Harper, CBS Sports
• Eddie Maisonet III, The Sports Fan Journal
• Andrew Nicholson, Sacramento Kings
• Lang Whitaker, NBA.com

Fresh Kicks: The Evolution of SLAM

11:25 – 11:55am

• Scoop Jackson
• Ben Osborne
• Quinn Peterson

The State of Chicago Sports (and Media)

11:55 – 12:40pm

• Moderator:  Sarah Spain, ESPN
• Jon Greenberg, ESPN Chicago
• Laurence Holmes, 670 The Score
• David Kaplan, Comcast SportsNet Chicago
• Jen Lada, Comcast SportsNet Chicago

• Dan Katz, Barstool Big Cat

Ask Spencer Anything

1:05 – 1:15pm

The Business of Football

1:15 – 1:35pm

Q&A with NFLPA Assistant Executive Director of External Affairs George Atallah & NFLPA President/Cincinnati Bengal Eric Winston.

We’ll Do It Live

1:35 – 2:00pm

• Jay Busbee, Yahoo
• Kevin Kaduk, Yahoo
• Frank Schwab, Yahoo

One-On-One: Christina & Fallon

2:00 – 2:20pm

Chicago-based journalist and activist Christina Kahrl interviews Chicago-based MMA fighter Fallon Fox.

Breaking Away From the Narrative: How to Navigate the Waters of 24/7 NFL Coverage

2:20 – 3:05pm

• Moderator, Michael Schottey, Bleacher Report, Football Insiders
• Eric Edholm, Yahoo! Sports
• Andrea Hangst, Bleacher Report
• Maggie Hendricks, USA Today
• Robert Klemko, MMQB

Your Pitch is Futile

3:05 – 3:45pm

• Mitch Germann, Fleishman-Hillard
• Ryan Glasspiegel, The Big Lead
• Robert Littal, Black Sports Online
• Dayn Perry, CBS Sports
• Zack Smith, Taylor

Justice, Society and the Rise of Online and Athlete Activists

3:45 – 4:30

• Moderator:  Kevin Blackistone, ESPN
• Julie DiCaro, A League of Her Own
• Aaron Harison, Co-Founder & President, Washington Free Beacon
• Greg Howard, Deadspin
• Chris Kluwe, NFL
• Cyd Zeigler, Outsports

For more on BWB6, visit their website and follow them on Twitter at @BlogsWithBalls

Maybe the early exit was just what the Cubs needed

Maybe the early exit was just what the Cubs needed

A year ago, the Cubs world was in essentially the exact same place — trying to find answers for a season that ended earlier than expected.

There was only one difference: Time.

The 2018 Cubs woke up on the morning of Oct. 22 having been out of action almost three full weeks. That's a long time in terms of decompressing, letting your body heal and evaluating what went wrong.

A year ago today, Ben Zobrist was in the midst of trying to heal his ailing wrist after a third straight trip deep into the postseason.

A year ago today, Theo Epstein was roughly 48 hours removed from his annual end-of-season eulogy.

A year ago today, Kris Bryant was trying to catch his breath after what he called the most draining campaign of his life.

Yet we woke up Monday morning 19 full days removed from the latest iteration of Epstein's end-of-season eulogy, Zobrist is making light-hearted Instagram videos and Bryant is already nearly three weeks into the process of letting his left shoulder heal completely and adding strength.

Of course, that trio of Cubs figures would gladly trade in these extra few weeks of time off for another shot at the NL pennant, even if they fell short in the NLCS again.

Still, there's a lot of value in extra time off, especially after three straight falls where they went deep into October playing high-stress baseball. The Cubs absolutely will go in 2019 much fresher than they went into this year's spring training.

For example, Jon Lester threw 8.1 fewer innings this October than 2017 and 29.2 fewer innings than 2016. Zobrist played 8 fewer games this October than 2018 and 16 fewer than 2016 (he also won the World Series in 2015 as a member of the Kansas City Royals). That matters when players' ages start creeping up into the mid-to-late 30s.

It shouldn't take the sting out of the disappointing end to 2018 for the Cubs or their fans, but extra time off for these guys is certainly not a bad thing. 

The Cubs have already gotten the ball rolling on offseason changes, including replacing Chili Davis at hitting coach with Anthony Iapoce

On top of that, each individual player has now had enough time to evaluate why or how they went wrong offensively down the stretch.

"A full winter — especially this extra month that we unfortunately have — is a luxury in baseball," Epstein said. "There are things that come up all the time during the course of the season with teams and with individual players that you say, 'We'd love to address.' But that's so hard to address during the season because there's always another game tomorrow. 

"Guys are surviving. We have to wait 'til the offseason, then we can get right physically, then we can wade into the mental game, then we can address this swing change, then we can handle this fundamental. Well, we now have that luxury — unfortunately — of a full offseason. How do we take full advantage of this so we're never in this position again?

"We don't want to be a part of an offensive collapse in the second half again. We don't want to be part of losing a division lead late again. We don't want to be part of looking back and recognizing that, gosh, maybe a greater sense of urgency from Game 1 through 162 would've led to one more game and then we're still playing. We don't want to be part of that ever again, so we need to make good use of this time."

The early exit also helps to create a chip on the shoulder for each member of the organization. It's hard to see the Cubs spending much time in 2019 lacking the same "urgency" they had this summer. The painful NL Wild-Card loss will leave a bad taste in their mouths that can carry over all the way until next October. 

Like Lester said, sometimes you "need to get your dick knocked in the dirt in order to appreciate where you're at." 

We saw that play out on the North Side of Chicago from 2015 into 2016 and Cole Hamels has seen this script before with a young core of players in Philadelphia.

In 2007, the Phillies made the playoffs, but were swept out of the NLDS by the Colorado Rockies. They rebounded to win the World Series the next fall over Joe Maddon's Tampa Bay Rays.

"That [2007 sweep] really kind of taught us what the postseason experience was and what it was to not just play to the end of the season and instead to play to the end of the postseason," Hamels said. "This is a tremendous experience for a lot of guys and you have to go through the hardships before you get to enjoy the big moments.

"I know there's a lot of players here that have won a World Series, but there's also a lot that didn't have that sort of participation that you would kind of look towards, so I think this is great for them. 

"It's exciting to see what they're gonna be able to do next year and the year after that because this is a tremendous team here with the talent that they have. It's gonna be a great couple years."

No, it actually doesn't make sense for the Bears to trade for Patrick Peterson

No, it actually doesn't make sense for the Bears to trade for Patrick Peterson

Things around the NFL got real  interesting this morning: 

Between Paterson's strong language and the fact that the Cardinals are one of the three-worst teams in the NFL this season, it seems like a pretty safe bet that this trade happens. 

As is tradition, each NFL team's fanbase started tweetin' about it: 

The guess here is that this trade caught Bears fans at exactly the wrong time. Between Brock Osweiler's 380 YDS, 3 TD game and Tom Brady's 277 YDS, 3 TD performance, people aren't exactly clamoring to buy stock in the Bears' passing defense right now. 

As of Week 6, however, the Bears pass defense ranked 1st in DVOA. No one was better. Granted, that's not where they'll be when DVOA is updated to reflect the last two games, but bailing on the Bears' pass D after two games (although a case could be made that their pass D wasn't THAT bad against New England) is foolish. There's also the fact that the Bears' secondary is already super-talented, highlighed by Bryce Callahan and Eddie Jackson both making it onto Pro Football Focus' first quarter All-Pro team. Granted, Kyle Fuller's had a slow start and Prince Amukamara hasn't been able to stay on the field, but the depth and talent of the Bears' secondary won't be their downfall. 

Positional need aside, the money just doesn't make sense for Chicago. First and foremost, the Bears just probably don't have what they'd need to bring in Peterson. According to Sportrac, the Bears have roughly $5.4 million in cap space this season - good for 23rd in the NFL (not that rank really matters, but just to give you an idea). 

That's not technically a deal breaker when it comes to Paterson, whose $11 million base salary is actually around $5.2 million once you prorate it for the first eight weeks of the year. So, if the Bears *wanted* to make a move for Peterson, the space is there. 

With that said, Peterson would come at a price that the Bears most likely don't have the luxury of affording. As of today, the market for trading top-tier secondary players has probably been set by this winter's Marcus Peters deal. In that trade, the Chiefs sent Peters and a sixth-round pick for one 4th-round pick this year and a 2nd round pick the following. As it stands, the Bears don't currently have anything better than a 4th-round pick until 2021. They definitely don't have the draft capital to match the Peters deal -- which was actually considered a light return at the time. 

And sure, the Bears could come at the Cardinals with a package built around current players, but why would that interest Arizona? Would a rebuilding team be THAT interested in Leonard Floyd, or some sort of Kevin White-Proven Vet combo? There's no incentive for the Cardinals to listen to any offer that doesn't include high round draft capital, and the Bears can't offer that. Paterson on the Bears would be an embarrassment of riches, but not one that the Bears can realistically swing.