Blackhawks

Bucks' Skiles puts house up for sale

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Bucks' Skiles puts house up for sale

It seems so long ago that the Milwaukee Bucks were considered a team on the rise.After a surprising 2009-10 season in which they finished with a 46-36 record and came close to upsetting the Atlanta Hawks in a seven-game first round series, the Bucks have dealt with injuries, poor chemistry and even in the midst of still fighting for the chance to sneak into the playoffs, comes some news that could mean change or nothing at all.According to Sheridan Hoops, Bucks coach Scott Skiles has put his home up for sale. According to real estate documents reviewed by SheridanHoops.com, the home was listed for sale on Feb. 23 for an asking price of 1,475,000, 100,000 more than it sold for on June 13, 2008. The 13-room home has four bedrooms, six bathrooms and a 3 12-car garage.Since taken the reigns in Milwaukee four years ago, Skiles has compiled a 144-162 record, which is honorable with not having much to work with in his time there.Its all speculation at this point, but the Bucks dont appear to be making any ground in competing in the Central Division, let alone seriously in the Eastern Conference. It might be time for a new voice.

Blackhawks Talk Podcast: It's time to be active in the change

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USA TODAY

Blackhawks Talk Podcast: It's time to be active in the change

Pat Boyle is joined by Charlie Roumeliotis, Scott King, Nick Gismondi, Slavko Bekovic and Tony Gill to discuss the George Floyd murder, the protests around the country and how to be an active participant in the change for equality for all.

Listen here or below.

Blackhawks Talk Podcast

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Dexter Fowler was racially profiled by nightclub while with Cubs teammates

Dexter Fowler was racially profiled by nightclub while with Cubs teammates

Cardinals outfielder Dexter Fowler shared a story on his Instagram Tuesday of a time he was racially profiled while at a club with his then-Cubs teammates.

Fowler, who played on the North Side from 2015-16, explained how he wasn't allowed into a club in Arizona with other members of the Cubs because he was wearing a gold chain. He said he was dressed nice and added the profiling of his attire didn't apply to his teammates, some who were dressed more casually.

When the club turned Fowler away, the group, which included first baseman Anthony Rizzo, left to show their support for him.

'What can I do'

Let me tell you a little story

A club in AZ turned me away because I had a gold chain on. While my friends had on shorts & vans & flip flops.

I was dressed nicely.

[Anthony Rizzo] and my friends with the [Cubs] left the club for me.

That's what you can do. Every day. It happens. EVERY DAY. There are opportunities EVERY DAY to help enforce change.

Fowler has been outspoken on social media regarding racial profiling amid nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. He described the hardships black people endure due to racism in a heartfelt Instagram post on Thursday.

View this post on Instagram

Here’s the thing. I know it’s hard to fully grasp why black people are outraged. It’s hard to grasp unless you’ve seen people hold their purses tighter when you walk by, when you have people refer to you as “not black” when you’re not “ghetto”. When your parents have to give you a talk when you’re just a kid. “you can’t act like your white friends. you’ll get killed. they won’t” This is a generational discussion EVERY black family has. It terrifies you as a kid, and as an adult. You don’t understand why we know, those officers didn’t flinch at murdering that man, because he is black. The race card. We hold it. You tell us “it’s not about race” if we ever hold you to it. You don’t want us to have even that 1 bone chilling “privilege” of defense. You don’t want us to hold any privilege. We don’t hold the privilege of being a criminal, making a mistake, or simply taking a jog, the same as a white man, and being treated the same. He couldn’t breathe. He was murdered. They were gently fired from their jobs. This isn’t right. This can’t go on. (if you assume “you”, is you, and you’re upset about the generalization...... just think about that for a second)

A post shared by Dexter Fowler (@dexterfowler) on

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