White Sox

Bulls welcome Warriors to United Center

311822.jpg

Bulls welcome Warriors to United Center

Thursday, Nov. 11, 2010
Updated 12:01 PM
By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

Throughout the league, it seems that every other team made a massive offseason roster overhaul designed to make them an instant contender (whether it's playoffs or championship) and reinvigorate their fan base as a contribution to the most anticipated NBA campaign in recent memory. Golden State is no exception.

The Warriors, however, had a much different summer than most teams in the aforementioned category. The addition of power forward David Lee--acquired in a sign-and-trade scenario with New York--got them the requisite big-money free agent, albeit one with a lower profile than some of the others on the market. But the Bay Area squad also got new ownership, headed by former minority Celtics owner Joe Lacob (which was somewhat surprising, considering fellow bidders included 24 Hour Fitness founder Mark Mastrov and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison) fired the winningest coach in NBA history, Don Nelson, just before training camp.

New head coach Keith Smart (yes, the same Keith Smart that led Indiana to the 1987 NCAA Championship over Syracuse with his now-legendary jumper in the clutch) pledged to implement a more defensive-oriented brand of basketball than Nelson's run-and-gun regime, but with little time to steep the team in his methods, no major style changes have yet occurred. Instead, Golden State (6-2) is winning games with the same familiar attack, but with a more traditional lineup and at least a conscience on the defensive end.

Lee, with center Andris Biedrins again playing significant minutes after a falling-out with "Nellie," constitutes a legitimate post-player duo, and while free-agent swingman Dorell Wright isn't a big name, his inclination to defend certainly make them less porous against the legions of scoring wings in the NBA. Meanwhile, the backcourt of scoring machine Monta Ellis and second-year point guard Stephen Curry appears to be co-existing peacefully, and more important, productively.

One of the league's most potent guard pairings, Ellis opened the season with a 46-point outburst after reports of him getting his personal life in order after marrying in the summer. Curry, last year's Rookie of the Year runner-up, is regarded as one of the league's top players at pick-and-roll basketball, a top sharpshooter and an underrated playmaker, something no doubt enhanced by his summer with USA Basketball.

The Warriors bench isn't much to write home about, with former D-League call-up Reggie Williams their most consistent offensive threat and the organization still crossing its fingers that ex-lottery pick Brandan Wright develops after numerous injury-prone season; history could repeat itself with current rookie and fellow big man Ekpe Udoh, the No. 6 overall pick who has yet to suit up--not even in summer league--due to a wrist injury. Still, whether or not their hot start persists, the culture seems to be changing, and despite having to give up reliable swingman Kelenna Azubuike, defensive stalwart Ronny Turiaf and high-upside youngster Anthony Randolph to the Knicks in order to get Lee (scorer Corey Maggette was also dealt, to Milwaukee for essentially role-playing reserves), thus far, it looks to be worth it.

It will take time before Golden State is a contender--or even a team that makes noise in the playoffs, like the beloved Baron Davis and Stephen Jackson-led bunch that dramatically upset the defending finalist and top-seeded Mavericks in the 2007 playoffs--but with Ellis' beginning to the year, he's now reportedly off the trading block and there's a core group from which the front office can build upon moving forward. But with a fresh face on the sidelines, a committed owner and the pieces in place to spread some optimism among some of the most passionate fans in the league, the future looks a lot brighter than it did a few months ago.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.coms Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Eloy Jimenez has high praise for Luis Robert: 'He's going to be the next Mike Trout'

Eloy Jimenez has high praise for Luis Robert: 'He's going to be the next Mike Trout'

Last spring, Michael Kopech said Eloy Jimenez was the Babe Ruth of this generation. Jimenez returned the favor by calling Kopech this generation's Nolan Ryan.

Well, start blocking out a wing of the Hall of Fame for members of the 2020 White Sox, because we've got another comp for the ages.

Obviously, everyone's very excited to see Luis Robert hit the major leagues. Jimenez is cranking that excitement up to 11.

"Some people are going to call me crazy," he said Friday before SoxFest kicked off at McCormick Place, "but he’s going to be the next Mike Trout.

"He has five tools, and he plays hard like Mike Trout."

Well then.

Trout has long been considered the best baseball player on the planet, someone who's putting up hall of Fame numbers on an annual basis to the extent that folks wonder if he's the best to ever play.

Should Robert come anywhere close to that, White Sox fans will be quite pleased.

Certainly the praise is not entirely unwarranted, with Robert boasting a full toolbox of baseball skills. He's fresh off a 2019 campaign that saw him set the minor leagues on fire: a .328/.376/.624 slash line to go along with 32 home runs, 92 RBIs, 108 runs scored, 31 doubles and 36 stolen bases. Along the way he sent highlight after highlight back to his adoring public on the South Side, clips of him blasting balls into the Charlotte sky, making eye-popping catches and using his blazing speed to great effect.

The defensive skill ought to be especially intriguing to Jimenez, who's going to play next to Robert in the White Sox outfield. But while Jimenez's defensive improvement will continue to be a big focus in 2020, so will Robert's range in center field. Jimenez has a plan, though, if Robert tries to steal away any of his fly balls.

"I’m going to draw a line," Jimenez said with a smile. "If he goes over the line, I’m going to punch him. It’s going to be like that this year."

It was just the minor leagues, of course, but those descriptions aren't terribly dissimilar from the ones frequently assigned to Trout out in Anaheim.

You likely won't hear Rick Hahn or Rick Renteria comparing Robert to the best player in the game, not wanting to put too much pressure on the 22-year-old. Jimenez knows as well as anyone how difficult the transition to the majors can be, even for the most talented athletes in the world. He set the minors ablaze in 2018, only to experience growing pains as opposing pitchers attacked him like a proven veteran.

So seeing something similar from Robert would not be surprising.

"Last year, I was a little bit anxious," Jimenez said, "and I know he’s going to be, too.

"The first year of your contract, you play on Opening Day, it’s going to be a little bit tough for him, too. It’s not going to be (tough) just for him, it’s for anybody who makes the Opening Day roster. It’s a little bit tough because it’s different pitching, it’s different stuff and the pitchers are a lot better at this level.

"He’s going to need someone. But he’s got (Jose) Abreu, he’s got (Yoan) Moncada and he’s got me. So he’s going to be good."

One of the biggest differences between Jimenez's ascent to the major leagues and Robert's is that Robert is joining a White Sox team with playoff expectations. Between the young core that broke out in such a big way last season and all the newcomers Hahn's front office brought in this winter, the White Sox look ready to vault into contention mode. Robert's arrival is a factor in those expectations, too, so while it might seem like the spotlight can be lured away by other players, Jimenez said it will be tough for Robert to adjust to the big leagues in relative obscurity.

"When you have five tools," he said, "everybody’s going to have their eyes on you."

Well put.

If he truly is the next Trout, then he'll never lose that spotlight. Though playing alongside the next Ruth and the next Ryan, a couple fellow future Hall of Famers, ought to help.

That might sound a little crazy, as Jimenez well knows. But he's sticking to that comp.

"You will see."

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the White Sox easily on your device.

Bulls Talk Podcast: 90s Throwback: Will Perdue discusses the Jordan effect

08-29_perdue_birthday_1920x1080_1308675651749.jpg
AP

Bulls Talk Podcast: 90s Throwback: Will Perdue discusses the Jordan effect

In our 90s throwback series we have been discussing the most important time in franchise history with people that were in it. This week host Jason Goff is joined by NBC Sports Chicago Bulls analyst and former Bull Will Perdue to discuss life as one of the greatest teams in the history of the sport.

(1:18) - Event that let him know this was going to be special

(4:40) - Being a teammate of Michael Jordan

(7:28) - Bulls had plenty of rivalries

(11:40) - Felt bad that Michael stopped other good players from winning

(12:40) - Phil Jackson was a master manipulator

(21:10) - Difference between Popovich and Jackson

Listen to the full episode in the embedded player below:

Bulls Talk Podcast

Subscribe: