Bears

Bulls win dogfight against rival Bucks to snap losing streak

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Bulls win dogfight against rival Bucks to snap losing streak

MILWAUKEETo snap the first three-game losing streak of the Tom Thibodeau era, the Bulls (6-6) relied on two elements that have been there for them since the coach first arrived in Chicago: Defense and rebounding. After trying to keep up with the up-tempo Bucks (6-5) initially, the Bulls went back to the basics and behind a Rip Hamilton flashback performance and a monster night from Carlos Boozer, they won a dogfight of a 93-86 game against their Central Division rival Saturday night at the Bradley Center.

Propelled by point guard Brandon Jennings (23 points, seven assists, five steals), who played like he was happy not to see injured Bulls superstar matching up against him, the Bucks started out on the right note, effectively pushing the pace, as theyve done early this season. Countering for the visitors was Hamilton (22 points), who attacked Milwaukees smallish guardsMonta Ellis (17 points) picked up a pair of quick fouls and was hit with a technical on his way off the courtin the post and via his trademark mid-range jumper.

The Bulls had their own foul difficulties, as starters Joakim Noah and Kirk Hinrich each picked up two fouls in the opening period, but managed to stay in the game, as forwards Boozer (22 points, 19 rebounds) and Luol Deng (14 points, eight rebounds) were productive. However, the up-and-down pace favored the hosts, who adopted an up-tempo style to favor their explosive scoring backcourt, and without stout defense to set the tone, the Bulls trailed, 30-28, through a quarter of play.

Milwaukee built a slight cushion early in the second quarter, as reserves like young big men Larry Sanders and Ekpe Udoh, as well as veteran backup guard Beno Udrih and Ellis, who had returned to the contest, all made an impact. Bulls backup swingman Jimmy Butler, who apparently has earned a more increased role in the rotation, provided energy and was even a primary offensive option for a stretch.

Toward the end of the first half, the contest evolved into a fast-paced shootout, featuring the quick triggers of Jennings and Ellis on one end, while the Bulls, also pushing the tempo, but playing a bit more methodically against Milwaukees set defense, leaned on Boozers interior game and Hamilton, who looked to be in his vintage Pistons contender heyday form. At the intermission, the game was deadlocked at 52 all.

After the break, the Bulls were successful in slowing down the Bucks and forcing them to play against a set defense, resulting in less easy scoring opportunities, although Jennings still converted some high degree-of-difficulty shots and starting forwards Ersan Ilyasova and Tobias Harris were also contributors. However, Milwaukee also clamped down on the defensive end, ensuring that the game remained a close-knit affair, despite the continued efforts of Hamilton and Boozer, in addition to Noah, who was attempting to make up for his foul-related first-half troubles.

One of the Bulls constant issues throughout the young season, turnovers, made a third-quarter appearance and although the Bucks didnt immediately capitalize on all of their guests miscues, ball security was quite the momentum killer for the visitors. Still, it remained a back-and-forth contest, and with Deng stepping up in various ways, Butler and Taj Gibson, Noah playing with his typical energy and the entire group making key defensive stops to close out the period, the Bulls headed into the final stanza with a 72-69 advantage.

The visitors, utilizing a defensive-oriented lineup, held on to their slight edge early in the games final frame, before going back to more scoring-proficient starters Boozer and Hamilton, illustrating the unsettled nature of the Bulls rotation, at least down the stretch of games. Milwaukee relied on its guard triostarters Jennings and Ellis, as well as key reserve Udrih, who made timely shots before giving way to the explosive aforementioned duofor point production, while Boozer emerged as a catalyst for the Bulls, with both his scoring and dominant work on the glass.

As crunch time in the contest approached, the Bulls past staplesdefense and reboundingcame through for them in the clutch, as a crucial Deng tip-in, defensive and stops were major moments late, while Boozer fittingly sealed the deal with a monster follow-up dunk with 29.8 seconds left, giving the visitors a 89-85 lead. Adding insult to injury, on the ensuing possession, after missing a shot, Jennings crumpled to the floor in a heap, apparently suffering an ankle injury and getting carried off the court by his teammates before the Milwaukees last-gasp and ultimately failed attempt at a comeback.

Matt Nagy calls Kevin White a 'great weapon' with a new future

Matt Nagy calls Kevin White a 'great weapon' with a new future

Former first-round pick Kevin White hasn't caught a break -- or a touchdown -- through the first three years of his career. He has more season-ending injuries than 100-yard games and after an offseason focused on upgrades at wide receiver, White's future in Chicago beyond 2018 is very much in doubt.

Ryan Pace declined the fifth-year option in White's rookie contract, making this a prove-it year for the pass-catcher who once resembled a blend of Larry Fitzgerald and Dez Bryant during his time at West Virginia.

He's getting a fresh start by new coach Matt Nagy.

"He is healthy and he's really doing well," Nagy told Danny Kanell and Steve Torre Friday on SiriusXM's Dog Days Sports. "We're trying to keep him at one position right now so he can focus in on that."

White can't take all the blame for his 21 catches, 193 yards and zero scores through 48 possible games. He's only suited up for five. Whether it's bad luck or bad bone density, White hasn't had a legitimate chance to prove, on the field, that he belongs.

Nagy's looking forward, not backward, when it comes to 2015's seventh pick overall.

"That's gone, that's in the past," Nagy said of White's first three years. "This kid has a new future with us."

White won't be handed a job, however.

"He's gotta work for it, he's gotta put in the time and effort to do it," Nagy said. "But he will do that, he's been doing it. He's a great weapon, he's worked really hard. He has great size, good speed. We just want him to play football and not worry about anything else."

Nagy on Trubisky: 'He wants to be the best'

Nagy on Trubisky: 'He wants to be the best'

The Bears concluded their second round of OTAs on Thursday with the third and final set of voluntary sessions scheduled for May 29-June 1. Coach Matt Nagy is bringing a new and complicated system to Chicago, so the time spent on the practice field with the offense and quarterback Mitch Trubisky has been invaluable.

"We’ve thrown a lot at Mitch in the last 2 ½ months,” Nagy told Dog Days Sports’ Danny Kanell and Steve Torre on Friday. “He’s digested it really well.”

Nagy’s implementing the same system he operated with the Chiefs, an offense that brought the best out of Redskins quarterback Alex Smith. The former first-overall pick went from potential draft bust to MVP candidate under Andy Reid and Nagy’s watch.

Nagy admitted he and his staff may have been a little too aggressive with the amount of information thrust upon Trubisky so far.  It took five years to master the offense in Kansas City, he said, but the first-year head coach sees a lot of similarities between his current and past quarterbacks.

"These guys are just wired differently,” Nagy said when comparing Trubisky to Smith. “With Mitch, the one thing that you notice each and every day is this kid is so hungry. He wants to be the best. And he’s going to do whatever he needs to do. He’s so focused.”

Smith had the best year of his career in 2017 and much of the credit belongs to Nagy, who served as Smith’s position coach in each season of his tenure in Kansas City. He threw for eight touchdowns and only two interceptions during the five regular season games that Nagy took over play-calling duties last year.

Nagy said Trubisky has a similar attention to detail that Smith brought to the Chiefs’ quarterback room.

"Each and every detail that we give him means something. It’s not just something he writes down in a book. He wants to know the why,” Nagy said of Trubisky. “He’s a good person that is in this for the right reason. His teammates absolutely love him. It was the same thing with Alex [Smith] in Kansas City.”

A locker room that believes in its quarterback is a critically important variable for success, one that Nagy already sees exists in Chicago.

"When you have that as a coach and when you have that as being a quarterback, not everybody has that, and when you have that you’re in a good spot.”