Bulls

Aaron Gordon breaks out a dunk for the ages in 2020 NBA Slam Dunk Contest

Aaron Gordon breaks out a dunk for the ages in 2020 NBA Slam Dunk Contest

Aaron Gordon was again a part of one of the greatest Slam Dunk Contests in the history of the NBA. The 2020 edition of the dunk contest featured Dwight Howard again donning the "Superman" outfit, Pat Connaughton with an ode to the film "White Men Can't Jump" and an absolutely amazing feat from Gordon, jumping over one of the largest players in the league.

Gordon's dunk over the 7-foot-5 Tacko Fall (Boston Celtics) only got a score of 47 out of 50, leading to Miami Heat forward Derrick Jones Jr. taking home the dunk contest trophy. Of course, the general sentiment around the league appears to be that Gordon was robbed of the victory, as many felt he was in the 2016 contest in which Zach LaVine took home first place despite some ridiculously impressive dunks from Gordon down the stretch. 

So as Jones takes home the AT&T Slam Dunk trophy, Gordon is again left wondering just what does he have to do to one day take home the hardware. 

NBA's return timeline further clouded by Toronto cancelling events through June

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USA Today

NBA's return timeline further clouded by Toronto cancelling events through June

Tuesday afternoon, Toronto Mayor John Torey announced the cancellation of permits for all major events through June 30. That includes festivals, parades and other large-scale, city-led events.

The question for fans combing through news clippings, hoping for the return of live sports: How does this affect the timeline for the potential resumption of the NBA, NHL and MLB seasons?

The knee-jerk reaction is to call it a major blow. That June 30 date comes after 40 previously-scheduled Blue Jays home games and would take us well beyond the previsouly-scheduled conclusion of the NBA and NHL playoffs (in which the Raptors and Maple Leafs were both locks). It's the longest a major North American city has committed to drastic, concrete social distancing guidelines — a barometer of just how murky the response, relief and recovery process from the COVID-19 pandemic still is.

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Important context: As of this writing, this ordinance does not directly bar the NBA, NHL or MLB from resuming play through that date. David Pagnotta of The Fourth Period reported as much shortly after the news broke:

Still, no major sports league should or will return before every conceivable safety clearance is met. Just because this decision doesn't directly prohibit leagues from re-assembling teams, doesn't mean it won't impact their decision-making. It will. 

As will current stay-at-home edicts in the United States. Illinois' — issued by Governor J.B. Pritzker — runs through April 30. On Monday, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam issued a stay-at-home order in his state that runs through June 10.

For what it's worth, the NBA appears motivated to somehow resolve its season at some point in the future. Recently, the idea of clustering teams and players into central, quarantined environments has been floated by prominent national reporters. Last week, Jabari Young of CNBC cited league sources in reporting that Las Vegas has been discussed as an option for such a concept.

But the logistical and emotional hurdles involved in any hypothetical return are immense. Look at the challenges Asian basketball leagues have encountered as evidence. At this point, it's impossible to say anything with even a modicum of certainty except that there is still a long, winding road ahead. 

Actions like those the city of Toronto has taken underscore that point.

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How to watch ESPN's 'The Last Dance' documentary on Michael Jordan, 1998 Bulls

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AP

How to watch ESPN's 'The Last Dance' documentary on Michael Jordan, 1998 Bulls

Tuesday morning, ESPN announced it is moving up the release of "The Last Dance" to Sunday nights over a five-week period from April 19 to May 17.

"The Last Dance" is an upcoming 10-part documentary series that promises to tell the untold story of the 1998 Bulls.

The series was originally scheduled to debut in June, but with the COVID-19 pandemic bringing live sports around the world to a halt, an early release was too tantalizing to dismiss.

"As society navigates this time without live sports, viewers are still looking to the sports world to escape and enjoy a collective experience," a statement reads. "We’ve heard the calls from fans asking us to move up the release date for this series, and we’re happy to announce that we’ve been able to accelerate the production schedule to do just that."

We're forever grateful.

Here's the schedule breakdown, per ESPN:

Episodes will also be made available on the ESPN App, ESPN.com and ESPN on Demand immediately following each installment's debut.

ESPN also announced that each episode will be available on Netflix for viewers outside of the United States just after midnight Pacific Standard Time the night they premiere. That breaks down as follows:

So buckle up, Bulls and basketball fans around the world. This should be a wild, can't-miss ride.

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