Bulls

Luka Doncic and Trae Young produced the most adorable moment from Chicago's All-Star weekend

luka-trae-rising-stars.jpg
USA TODAY

Luka Doncic and Trae Young produced the most adorable moment from Chicago's All-Star weekend

There are plenty of highlights every All-Star weekend, but Luka Doncic, with some help from Trae Young, created something special during Friday’s Rising Stars game.

Doncic threw up a shot just before the halftime buzzer from just beyond half-court and banked it in. It was a cool highlight for the United Center crowd and Doncic was clearly having fun with Young as it went in.


On replay, the clip of the two watching it in the air as it went in is a thing of beauty.


A little shared body language to help the ball go in and a great reaction from the pair of young guards. Even in the background you can see the servicemen absolutely lose their minds when the shot goes in.

It’s just the beginning of Chicago’s All-Star weekend, but that is an early favorite to be among the top moments.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls easily on your device.

Ranking the top five dunks in Bulls franchise history, once and for all

Ranking the top five dunks in Bulls franchise history, once and for all

From Jordan to Pippen to Rose to LaVine, the Bulls have employed a number of transcendent athletes in their franchise's history.

Even in tumultuous times, the unmatched bunnies of the names above (and many more) have translated into a number of exhilirating highlights, especially in the dunk category.

But only five slams can make NBC Sports Chicago's Definitive Top Five Bulls Dunks of All Time© ranking. See below, but don't even think about @-ing me:

5. Michael Jordan finger wags Dikembe Mutombo

How does one not crack a smile thinking of this gem? Needed for context: This dunk came months after Mutombo claimed, on camera at the 1997 All-Star game, that Jordan “hadn’t gotten” him with a poster-dunk yet in his career — a show of hubris that was met with utter bemusement by Jordan. 

Fast forward to Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals that year, and it was revenge time. Off a deft two-man action with Luc Longley, Jordan streaked across the baseline, corralled a bounce pass, and in one sweeping motion rose and stuffed the ball through the basket — directly on Mutombo’s forehead. 

And as Jordan backpedaled down the floor, he was sure to give Mutombo a taste of his own medicine in the form of a finger wag. Even Phil Jackson cracked a smile. That game, a 107-92 Bulls win, decided that series, and the Bulls went on to clinch their fifth title of the decade weeks later.

4. Taj Gibson bodies Dwyane Wade in the Eastern Conference Finals

I maintain it is impossible to watch this dunk without emitting audible and involuntary noises. The ferocity. The spontaneity. I don’t have a word for this, but the way Gibson bounces off Wade mid-air, but instead of sending him sprawling to the floor, the impact actually boosts him higher into the air. That’s when you know you really bodied someone.

What’s more, this slam came in a Game 1 of the 2011 Eastern Conference Finals that the Bulls seized over the widely villainized Miami Heat, 103-82. Of course, the Heatles went on to rip four straight wins en route to a five-game series victory, but in the moment, this felt like a coming-of-age for an ever-underestimated Bulls team on a meteoric rise. 

This Gibson dunk serves as a snapshot of that sentiment, even all these years laters. Memories. 

3. Derrick Rose goes upstairs on Goran Dragic

Everything about this dunk is iconic. From Rose’s trademark explosiveness off two feet, to the mid-air cockback into a tomahawk, to the exuberance of Bulls color commentator Stacey King:

“Oh, stop it! Stop it! Did not do him like that! What are you doing, Dragic? Did you not get the memo? Derrick Rose can go upstairs!

Then, on the replay: “I want to go HIGHER! Oh my goodness.”

Soul-snatching stuff from Rose, and a legendary call by King. Plus, coming off a Rookie of the Year campaign and strong playoff showing against the Celtics in 2009, it added another notch to Rose’s rapidly rising star. All in all, one of the more poignant memories from that era.

2. Jordan pummels Patrick Ewing

To maximally appreciate this dunk requires a frame-by-frame breakdown of the possession that led to it. Bear with me.

It begins with a full-court Knicks press, which the Bulls busted by way of a looping Horace Grant pass to John Paxson near half-court. Paxson reeled the ball in, landed, and, faced with two defenders in his grill, quickly flared a pass out to Jordan on the left wing. Normally, an offensive team is rewarded for busting an opponent’s press with some form of a numbers advantage on the attacking end, but not Jordan. On the catch, he was immediately met by Mark Jackson and a flailing-armed Kiki Vandewhege, but as Jackson lurched forward to attempt a steal, Jordan skirted past him with a decisive left-handed drive. For an instant, he appeared on a clear path to the basket.

But just when he had built up a head of steam, the stout Charles Oakley slid in to block his path. Jordan quickly took one dribble backwards, then cut back to the rim on a dime, leaving Oakley and Jackson (trailing the play) completely off balance. One dribble later, Jordan was at the rim and elevated for a gravity-defying slam that rendered the 7-foot Patrick Ewing a traffic cone.

For those keeping track at home: En route to this dunk, Jordan effectively waxed three Knicks defenders (all of solid reputation!) before even reaching Ewing, adding to the impossibility of a dunk that deserves a place on this list in a vacuum. Is this the time to mention this sequence took place in the decisive Game 3 of a first round playoff series between the two in 1991, the year Jordan and the Bulls would eventually be crowned NBA champions for the first time?

1. Scottie Pippen ends Ewing and Spike Lee

Poor Patrick. We won’t go pixel-by-pixel on this one, but Pippen’s feat of superheroic athleticism and elasticity here is unmatched in Bulls dunk history. On this transition slam, Pippen took off from damn near outside the painted area, bumped bodies with Ewing in the air, and still finished from well-above the rim, nearly landing on top of him on the way down.

That landing is where things got interesting. Pippen, graceful as ever,  transitioned seamlessly from air-dancer to trash-talker by stepping over Ewing (and sharing a few words with him) after each of them hit the floor — Ewing on his behind, Pippen on his feet. 

Ewing got a shove in from underneath, and Spike Lee, even sitting on the Chicago Stadium floor, attempted to come to Ewing’s defense. But Pippen brushed them both off. Even though he earned a technical foul for the step-over and taunt, it’s clear who came out of this interchange the winner. Is there a play more emblematic of the Bulls-Knicks rivalry?

Years later, on ESPN’s The Jump, Pippen said that it was his “most disrespectful dunk” ever, adding with a laugh that he and Ewing (as of May 2019) were not on speaking terms because of it. 

If that’s not No. 1 worthy, I don’t know what is.

Every other night through April 15, NBC Sports Chicago is airing the entirety of the Bulls' 1996 NBA championship run. Find the full schedule here.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls easily on your device.

Bulls provided plenty of story angles to cover during 1996 NBA Finals

Bulls provided plenty of story angles to cover during 1996 NBA Finals

The Chicago Tribune featured bylines from nine different reporters off Game 1 of the 1996 NBA Finals.

This didn’t account for photographers shooting the game, an on-site editor and other reporters working on feature angles for off days during the series.

Yeah, the Bulls were a pretty big deal.

As “sidebar" writers, those charged to flesh out angles not gobbled up by the main game story and lead columnists, Teddy Greenstein — who is still firing on all cylinders there — and I used to joke about the density of our coverage.

“I’ll write about Randy Brown’s first half,” our typical joke would go, “and you write about his second half.” Or: “I’ve got 400 words on Jud Buechler’s second quarter,” we’d say.

But truth be told, beyond both of us being thrilled for the opportunity, the Bulls provided plenty of angles to explore. And on this night — sorry, Teddy — I got the better assignment.

While his sidebar focused on Luc Longley’s offensive production in the face of consistent foul trouble, I got to write about Toni Kukoc, who arguably stole the show in his first NBA Finals appearance. Not that Kukoc wasn’t used to big stages from his days as a standout overseas.

What made Kukoc’s 18 points in Game 1 stand out so prominently were three things: He scored 10 straight points early in the fourth to break open a taut contest. He sat mired in a miserable shooting slump through the first three playoff series, averaging 9.3 points on 36 percent shooting that included an unsightly 3-for-36 from 3-point range. And his reserve role proved prominent on a night bench brothers Steve Kerr, Buechler and Brown combined to shoot 0-for-10.

“The atmosphere is pretty much the same, except for the [number of] media. That you can’t compare,” Kukoc said of his first Finals appearance. “But the NBA is the best. This is the ultimate.”

Kukoc spoke while sitting on a dais with Scottie Pippen in a dual postgame news conference. When Kukoc fielded a question on whether his first 3-pointer finding bottom lifted a burden that would cause him to start demanding the ball, Pippen interjected.

“He always says that,” Pippen joked.

Every other night through April 15, NBC Sports Chicago is airing the entirety of the Bulls' 1996 NBA championship run. Find the full schedule here.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls easily on your device.