Bulls

Observations: Dunn-LaVine chemistry, bad Bulls, good Raps

Observations: Dunn-LaVine chemistry, bad Bulls, good Raps

Mismatched pieces: Kris Dunn made his return after a near-month absence from a concussion he suffered against Golden State, and immediately you could see the small dividends.

On the first possession, he pulled up for a midrange jumper, showing no ill effects from the injury. He also drove to the basket and played relatively aggressive, which is a hallmark to his effectiveness.

He didn’t stand out statistically but the Bulls’ pace was evident in his 20 minutes, as he totaled eight points and three assists.

What will be critical over the final 25 games after the All-Star break is the on-floor chemistry between Dunn and Zach LaVine.

LaVine was coming off one of his best stretches as a pro, averaging 25.3 points and six rebounds over his last four games. The production regressed a bit, as the Raptors showed why they’re one of the top 10 teams on both ends of the floor—particularly defensively as the driving lanes weren’t plentiful aside from a couple athletic takes to the rim.

He only finished with seven points in 27 minutes, but 14 games into his season, anomalies are expected.

If this game were closer, one of the questions would be around how the Bulls would navigate late-game execution between Dunn and LaVine. LaVine was aggressive late in the wins against the Timberwolves and Magic, while Fred Hoiberg termed Dunn the Bulls’ “closer” when they went on their remarkable run after starting 3-20.

Hoiiberg didn’t want to truly entertain the “who’s the man” question before the game because…well, these two have only played four games together this season.

Last year there wasn’t much time to play together because Dunn didn’t play much and LaVine was hurt by midseason.

“You definitely have to find the chemistry out there,” Dunn said. “When you find the chemistry and the right groove and everybody knows each other, things are a lot easier. It’s only been four games. It’ll take time. Hopefully we get it right away in the second half.”

If there’s an issue of actual substance for the last third of the season, it’s probably not figuring out the Cam Payne conundrum that will get people’s juices going headed into 2018-19, it’ll be figuring out how the backcourt of the future performs together.

“Kris has been good. I have chemistry with him from our days in Minnesota,” LaVine said. “For all of us getting to know each other, still. Me, him, Lauri, getting to know each other and meshing. We weren’t as competitive as we should’ve been, and aggressive. We gotta get better with that.”

Speaking of backcourts: The backcourt of the present, Toronto’s All-Star duo of DeMar DeRozan and Kyle Lowry, didn’t have to play like their All-Star selves for the Raptors to cruise to an easy win.

Lowry has continued his all-around play with 20 points, 10 assists and seven rebounds, taking just 10 shots in his 27 minutes while hitting four triples. DeRozan, who had a field day against the Bulls in his earlier visit to the United Center with 35 points, only went 3-for-11 in 28 minutes for seven points and eight assists.

But that’s the beauty of these Raptors, who’ve continued to build around their backcourt and evolved into one of the league’s most versatile and deepest teams as they have the Eastern Conference’s best record at 41-16.

Their bench combined for 56 points and hammered the Bulls in the paint for 60 points, shooting 52 percent from the field and taking a 26-point lead. They have length and athleticism along with youth and energy—in most other years, they could be a real threat to qualify for the NBA Finals.

Too bad the Cleveland Cavaliers exist and more specifically, LeBron James. The Cavs beefed up at the deadline and now look like the favorites to get back to the Finals—and they’ll likely have to get through the Raptors to get there.

“Dwane Casey has done an unbelievable job with that team,” Hoiberg said. “Absolutely phenomenal. And that team is playing with so much confidence and swagger.”

Effort: It’s been awhile since the Bulls’ effort could truly come into question. Their execution, talent level and decision-making has been what held them back in most of their losses in the last month or so.

With 48 minutes between them and a much-needed All-Star break, the Bulls slept through their alarm clock and kept hitting the snooze button.

After taking a six-point lead in the first quarter, they were outscored by 30 in the last three.

“It reminded me of an earlier stretch in the season when adversity hit us and we shut down, and that can’t happen,” Hoiberg said. “We’ve got to keep playing, we’ve got to keep battling, which we’ve done a very good job of for the most part this season.”

Hoiberg even picked up his second technical of the season, being so frustrated with the officiating and his team’s energy level. Shooting just four of 24 from three tends to gray Hoiberg’s hair a little quicker than most nights.

LaVine said, “we sucked”, which put Hoiberg’s sentiments much more succinctly.

“I think it got the best of us,” Dunn said. “Shots just weren’t falling and when it doesn’t fall then adversity hits and when it does, we just got to be able to fight through it. They were comfortable the whole game.

Leading: Dunn’s words sounded just like Hoiberg’s, and if you take the position that the leader of the team and coach need to be on the same accord, it shouldn’t be surprising Dunn plans to take a more vocal role for the final 25 games.

He purposely didn’t want to assert himself so strongly to start the year, he said. It could’ve been in part because his early play wouldn’t have garnered the currency to be a leader (remember the late behind-the-back pass in Phoenix), but since early December, he’s been the catalyst.

“I stepped back because we had so many veterans and other players to be the leaders. I just went out there to do it with action,” Dunn said.

In these 11 games he’s been out, Dunn’s presence and qualities haven’t been duplicated. They’ve played hard but have missed his passion and confidence that borders on arrogance (remember the yelling to the crowd as he closed a win against the Utah Jazz in December), but it’s been necessary.

Averaging 15 points, eight assists, 4.5 rebounds and 2.2 steals in his last 21 games gives him the type of currency in the locker room to lead. He deferred to Robin Lopez, Justin Holiday and Quincy Pondexter.

Clearly it’s been part of a master plan, a plan one can say he executed to near-perfection.

“Now I want to start trying to be a vocal leader, carrying to the second half and the summer and next season, starting the year quicker.”

Already looking to next year is probably music to most fans’ ears.

But there’s 100 quarters left to play.

The countdown is on.

Report: Bulls sign former Arizona Wildcat Rawle Alkins to two-way contract

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USA TODAY

Report: Bulls sign former Arizona Wildcat Rawle Alkins to two-way contract

A report on Sunday from Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports indicated that the Bulls have agreed to a two-way contract with former Arizona Wildcat Rawle Alkins. 

The 6'5'' guard was a teammate of Lauri Markkanen on the 2017 Wildcats, and many expected him to be a potential lottery pick after showing off the all-around skill set that also made him the top player in the state of New York in high school.

After going undrafted, Alkins played for the Toronto Raptors Summer League team, where he put up 9 points, 4.67 rebounds and 2 assists per game. In the six Las Vegas Summer League games he played in, Alkins shot poor from the field (37 percent) and the free throw line (62.5 percent), but he knocked down his 3-pointers, shooting 43.9 percent on a healthy 3.5 attempts from deep per game. 

There is an obvious fit on the Bulls for a player like Alkins.

He was a career 36.5 percent 3-point shooter in his two college seasons, and has the physical profile of a great wing defender at the NBA-level. Alkins has a 6'9'' wingspan, and at a listed 220 lbs., it is easy to see him having the potential to guard four-to-five different positions on the floor. At this stage of the rebuild, the Bulls could really use as many of the coveted "3-and-D" wings as they can get. And there are some, like, The Ringer's Chris Vernon, who think that Alkins has the potential to become a glue guy.

Alkins will be a fan favorite wherever he plays. You want a Marcus Smart, Tony Allen, or P.J. Tucker–type player when you need a big play in a big game. I see that with Alkins.

-Chris Vernon 

The nature of the two-way contract means that Bulls fans will have to catch Windy City Bulls games to see Alkins in action. But much like Antonio Blakeney last season, we could see Alkins make an instant impact in the G League and get a call-up sooner than later, especially if the Bulls decide to move on from veteran Justin Holiday.

Either way, the pick up is a shrewd move by the Bulls front office. Alkins is a well-rounded, defense-first player who will be joining a young roster overstocked with scoring talent, but thin on defenders capable of guarding on the perimeter or executing a switching defense at a high level.

Jabari Parker and Tyler Ulis shine at open run in Chicago

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USA TODAY

Jabari Parker and Tyler Ulis shine at open run in Chicago

Jabari Parker is looking forward to what will surely be an intriguing season for he and the Chicago Bulls.


Parker signed a two-year, $40 million contract, that essentially acts as a tryout for the Bulls. The second year of the contract is a team option, meaning should things not go well, the organization can cut ties with him. But after 183 career games with the Bucks over four seasons, it was clear that Parker was in need of a fresh start. In Chicago, he will slide in as the day one starting small forward, and is already paid like a player who is definitely appreciated by his organization.


But with all of the off the court stuff taken care of for now, Parker's main focus is getting in to the best shape of his life, as he prepares for a full season as a wing player. 


Part of Parker's preparation was a great pickup game in downtown Chicago organized by the Chicago Basketball Club.

For Bulls fans itching to get a look at Parker on the court, the video shows off some flashy passing ability, impressive handles and a flurry of pull-up jumpers from the 23-year old forward. He also finishes well in transition in the video, though that is to be taken with a grain of salt as Parker was easily the biggest player on the court. 


Other players in the pickup game included former Simeon teammate of Parker's, Kendrick Nunn; and NBA free agent and former Marion Catholic star Tyler Ulis (a possible Bulls target?). If Parker looks as dynamic against NBA competition as he did in the pickup game below, the Bulls are going to have one of the more valuable contracts in the league in 2020, and would be likely to lock up Parker to a long-term deal.