Bulls

Orlando Magic suffer tough injury amid battle with Bulls for No. 8 seed

Orlando Magic suffer tough injury amid battle with Bulls for No. 8 seed

On Thursday, ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski reported Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac had an MRI, revealing a severe sprain and bone contusion.

John Denton of OrlandoMagic.com reported specific details on the injury, stating that it was a "posterior lateral corner" injury and gave a timeline about the same as Woj's. 

The Magic also released an official statement on Isaac's condition:

Why is this news so important to the Bulls?

Chicago is locked in a tight race for the No. 8 seed with the rest of the bottom of the Eastern Conference. Heading into Thursday's game against the Utah Jaz, the Bulls are 2.0 games back of Orlando in the standings. The Detroit Pistons and Charlotte Hornets are both 3.0 games back of Orlando for the No. 8 seed. 

Isaac is arguably the Magic's most important player outside of All-Star center Nikola Vucevic. Isaac is second on the team in Net Rating (0.3) tied with Vucevic for the team-lead in defensive rating (105.1). 

The versatile 6-foot-11 forward is averaging 12.0 points, 6.9 rebounds, 1.4 assists, 1.6 steals and 2.4 blocks per game, all career-highs. The gaudy defensive numbers particularly stand out and put him in an exclusive club of one at this point of the season.

Without Isaac in the lineup for at least two months, the Magic will likely rely on young swingmen Wes Iwundu and Melvin Frazier Jr. to fill the void at the forward opposite Aaron Gordon.

The playoff race is the main reason the Bulls should be monitoring Isaac and the Magic but there is also the off-chance that the Magic are looking for a trade to add some frontcourt depth. While extremely unlikely, the are permutations of a Bulls-Magic trade that could work financially. 

The more likely scenario, of course, is the Magic trade with a non-Bulls team for help or simply stand pat as they await the return of their young defensive star. 

Per Tankathon.com, the Magic have the 14th toughest remaining schedule in the league, while the Bulls have the 2nd toughest schedule the rest of the 2019-20 regular season.

UPDATE: After the Bulls' 102-98 loss to the Jazz, they sit tied with the Charlotte Hornets in ninth at 2.5 games back of the No. 8 seed (Orlando). 

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A defiant Jim Boylen doubles down on his usage of late-game timeouts

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USA Today

A defiant Jim Boylen doubles down on his usage of late-game timeouts

Jim Boylen’s late-game timeouts while facing seemingly insurmountable deficits are here to stay.

“We were down eight (points) with 40 seconds to go in Charlotte and won. So it does happen,” Boylen said. “But I can see where people would think it's unnecessary. That’s OK.”

That Boylen allowed for some questioning of his late-game tactics is the only change in this lingering story. They’ve become a larger story because, for the second time this season, cameras showed Zach LaVine expressing frustration or bewilderment over the move.

Following Boylen’s latest example of the practice — with the Bulls down 10 and 40 seconds to go in Saturday’s loss to the Suns — the coach disputed the assertion that his players are frustrated by his unconventional tactics. Nevertheless, he met with LaVine before LaVine addressed reporters late Saturday.

“[LaVine]'s frustrated. I think our team is frustrated. Nobody likes to lose games. We’re competitive people. I coach to the end of games. You guys know that. Could some people judge look at that timeout as unnecessary? Of course they can. You can judge it any way you want,” Boylen said before Sunday’s game versus the Wizards. “He’s a fighter. We’re going to fight to the end. I’m going to coach our guys to the end. I think there’s a misconception that Zach and I only talk when there’s something good to talk about or something bad to talk about. We talk all the time. I think it’s a healthy, productive relationship.”

Boylen said LaVine told him that he’s the coach and can call timeout whenever he wants, which squares with what LaVine told reporters. But LaVine also admitted to it being hard to stay locked in for developmental timeouts in the face of such large deficits, not to mention the constant losing.

Nevertheless, Boylen downplayed LaVine’s public reactions.

“You can video me on a 2-on-1 when we turn it over and I make an expression. You can video me on a wide-open 3-pointer we miss and then on the other end they make a contested three and I make an expression. You can do that on every clip and every situation,” Boylen said. “[Setting the tone is] all I’ve been trying to do. I did it last year. I did it this year. We’re trying to establish that we’re going to play until the end and we’re going to compete. We’ve had some tremendous comeback wins this year where we’ve kept playing so I think the guys get that. But I think what we can’t do is not expect people to be frustrated with a losing streak or a home loss. That’s a healthy thing that there’s frustration. It’s a healthy thing that you’ve got competitive people that are upset that we’re hurt and we’re fighting to win games.”

Boylen said the front office supports his practice of coaching to the end.

“I talked to (executive vice president) John (Paxson) this morning. We talk every day,” Boylen said. “I told him, 'I'm gonna coach these guys hard. John (said), ‘Keep doing what you're doing.' It's what we have to do.

“Is there a chance where maybe I'm more competitive in those situations? I think I have to own that.”

Asked if it’s almost defiance, Boylen agreed.

“That I don't want to lose? Yeah. I don't like losing,” he said. “We had a 17-point lead. I thought we played our hearts out — shorthanded — and we battled, got the game back under control. We're up 1 with 7 minutes to go and we didn't play very well the last seven minutes, but yeah I'm hanging onto that.”

Boylen also called a timeout in Toronto in the waning moments on Super Bowl Sunday with the Bulls down over 20 points. A Raptors broadcaster rebuked Boylen for the move.

But Boylen on Sunday reiterated what he said that day, that the timeout was for developmental purposes.

“The thing in Toronto is a different situation. How many ATOs you think Adam Mokoka has had drawn up for him? So that’s a totally different situation — coaching a guy that’s part of our development program, is in a situation he’s never been in and to have something run for him, I think that’s important,” Boylen said. “I don’t worry about if (criticism) is fair or not. I’ve got a job to do. I don’t listen to the cheers and I don’t listen to the boos and I don’t listen to the negativity. I don’t do it. I’ve got a job to do, and I’m going to keep doing it.”

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Posterized presents 'Chicagoland's All-Time Starting Five' plus Q&A with Jason Goff

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ShotByBOC

Posterized presents 'Chicagoland's All-Time Starting Five' plus Q&A with Jason Goff

Over the 2020 NBA All-Star Weekend in Chicago, the "Posterized: The Chicago Experience by Jim Beam" event celebrated the rich history of Chicagoland high school hoops by honoring an all-time starting five, featuring five Chicagoland preps legends, voted on by Chicago sports fans

Fans had from Feb. 6 to Feb. 10 at 9 pm.. to vote for their top five from a list of names that included Candace Parker, Derrick Rose, and the late Benji Wilson. The final results were revealed on Feb. 14, at the Chicago Sports Museum & Harry Caray's 7th inning stretch restaurant.

The Chicagoland all-time starting five was Derrick Rose (Simeon), Isiah Thomas (St. Joseph), Dwyane Wade (Richards), Anthony Davis (Perspectives Charter) and Antoine Walker (Mount Carmel). I was able to speak with the host of the event about the experience and the final list, NBC Sports Chicago's Jason Goff.

 

Q: How was your experience at 'Posterized: The Chicago Experience' and what ultimately led to your interest in hosting the event? 

It was a terrific experience. Joy Glover and her team put together a really cool experience for locals and people who aren't from Chicago. All things party, Chicago basketball appreciation; and All-Star weekend rolled into one event. When Joy reached out through a mutual friend, I didn't hesitate. The idea was cool and the execution during the busiest time I've seen in quite a while was excellent. 

Q: Ultimately, do you think the fans got the starting five right? Was there anyone you were shocked didn't make the final cut? 

There are so many names that were on the list that deserve recognition. We're all prisoners of whatever generation of basketball we grew up in. Quinn Buckner, Mark Aguirre, George Mikan, etc. Just to name a few. Also, the women's game could've received a little more gratitude by our voters as well. Candace Parker, Cappie Pondexter; and many others have had just as much success inside and outside of this city as anyone. 

Q: Who in your opinion had the best high school career out of the Chicagoland all-time starting five?

Of the ones named? Probably Derrick Rose. But nobody has done more winning than Quinn Buckner (a member of undefeated Thornridge High School team in 1972).

Q: When it's all said and done, who do you think will have the best NBA career of the Chicagoland all-time starting five?

Unless Anthony Davis wins a few titles, it'd have to be Dwyane Wade with Isiah Thomas as a close second.

Between the five players that make up Posterized's all-time starting five, there are six NBA Championships, an NBA MVP, and 17 All-NBA appearances. Below are some of the accomplishments of this illustrious group:

Isiah Thomas:

High school (St. Joseph-Westchester): State finalist (1979), McDonald's All-American (1979), first-team Parade All-American, USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year (1980)

Indiana (NCAA): NCAA champion (1981), NCAA Tourney MVP (1981), two-time All-Big Ten, Consensus First-Team All-American (1981)

NBA (Detroit Pistons): Five-time All-NBA, Two-time NBA Champion (1988-89, 1989-90), 1989-90 Finals MVP, Hall of Famer

Derrick Rose:

Simeon (High school): State finalist (1979), McDonald's All-American (1979), First-Team Parade All-American, USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year (1980)

Memphis (NCAA): NCAA runner-up (2008)

NBA (Chicago Bulls, New York Knicks, Cleveland Cavaliers, Detroit Pistons): 2008-09 Rookie of the Year, one-time All-NBA, 2010-11 MVP

Dwyane Wade:

Richards (High school): Led Richards to the Class AA sectional finals in his senior year

Marquette (NCAA): First-team All-American (2003), Conference USA Player of the Year (2003), No. 3 jersey retired by Marquette

NBA (Miami Heat, Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers): Eight-time All-NBA, Three-time NBA champion (2005-06, 2011-12, 2012-13), Finals MVP (2005-06), No. 3 jersey retired by Heat

Antoine Walker:

Mount Carmel (High school): Chicago Tribune 1994 Boys All-State Basketball Team, First-team Parade All-American (1994)

Kentucky (NCAA): SEC Tournament MVP (1995), First-team All-SEC (1996), NCAA Champion (1996)

NBA (Boston Celtics, Dallas Mavericks, Miami Heat, Atlanta Hawks, Minnesota Timberwolves): 15,647 career points, 1996-97 All-Rookie, three-time All-Star, 2005-06 NBA Champion

Anthony Davis:

Perspectives (High school): First-team Parade All-American (2011), Jordan Brand Classic co-MVP (2011)

Kentucky (NCAA): 2011-12 SEC Defensive Player of the Year, 2012 SEC Player of the Year, Naismith Award, Wooden Award, NCAA Champion (2011-12)

NBA (New Orleans Pelicans, Los Angeles Lakers): 2012-13 All-Rookie, three-time blocks leader, three-time All-Defensive team, three-time All-NBA

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