Bulls

Philadelphia 76ers rookie Matisse Thybulle having fun with his stay-at-home workouts

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USA TODAY

Philadelphia 76ers rookie Matisse Thybulle having fun with his stay-at-home workouts

With sports suspended due to COVID-19, players across all leagues have taken to the internet to keep themselves occupied, and to give fans a glimpse into how they're coping.

Phildelphia 76ers rookie Matisse Thybulle recently revealed that part of his team's care package included a couple basketballs. Not knowing what else to do with them, Thybulle turned his apartment into a makeshift dribble drill course. He proceeded to go through it in full uniform... minus the shoes (to add extra challenge in slippery socks?).

Hope his downstairs neighbors have ear plugs.

He recorded the fun on Tik Tok. Can Bulls rookie Coby White top this?

@itsmatisse

I sincerely apologize to my neighbors for the noise ##QuarantineChronicles

♬ original sound - itsmatisse

Remember when Tim Duncan dismissed Michael Jordan in a 1998 interview?

Remember when Tim Duncan dismissed Michael Jordan in a 1998 interview?

Tim Duncan isn’t impressed by pretty much anyone. Not even Michael Jordan.

That shouldn’t come as a particular surprise. Duncan’s unassuming nature and lengthy list of NBA accolades don’t make him one likely to stand in awe of the greatness of others.

But apparently, in an interview with Dan Patrick — from 1998, no less — the Spurs star was pretty brazen in his (respectful) dismissal of Jordan. These quotes, via Stefan Bondy of the New York Daily News, were delivered after Duncan’s rookie season, which aligned with the Bulls’ final title run recently depicted in ESPN’s “The Last Dance.”

Patrick: … You met Jordan?

Duncan: But Jordan’s Jordan. I’ve always respected him but I’ve never been a fan of his.

Patrick: Why aren’t you a fan of Jordan’s?

Duncan: Because everybody else is.

Patrick: Oh, so you don’t like Michael Jordan because everybody else does.

Duncan: No, I don’t like Michael Jordan because I don’t like Michael Jordan. You got me wrong there. I respect Michael Jordan.

Patrick: You respect him. You just don’t like him?

Duncan: I’m just somebody that isn’t impressed by him. There really isn’t anyone in the world I’m impressed with. (Except, maybe, for Stephon Marbury, who Duncan later listed, along with Shareef Abdur-Rahim, as his favorite players in the league to watch.)

But, yeah. Tell us how you really feel, Timmy.

It’s certainly a departure from the perpetual lauding of Jordan that’s become the norm over the decades since his retirement — especially from fellow NBA greats. But at the end of the day, you absolutely have to respect the level of brand-conscious indifference, to something seemingly everyone else loves, exhibited by Duncan here. Contrarians unite.

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How Toni Kukoc knew Michael Jordan was going to unretire and rejoin Bulls

How Toni Kukoc knew Michael Jordan was going to unretire and rejoin Bulls

In the run-up to Michael Jordan breaking his first retirement to rejoin the Bulls, mystery, rumor and large swaths of media swirled about the Berto Center in force — all trying to catch a glimpse of Jordan sneaking in and out, or procure the soundbite that would foreshadow his ultimate return.

While mum was the word around the Bulls on Jordan’s plans, Toni Kukoc had a feeling he knew what was coming. He described the moment he realized for sure Jordan was planning a comeback on NBC Sports’ “Sports Uncovered” podcast.

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“It was time to go practice, and once I went to the locker room and I saw about 40, 50 pairs of Jordans at his locker,” Kukoc said on the podcast. “I said to myself there is no way he’s going to one practice with 50 pairs of shoes ready.”

Kukoc’s detective work rang true. On March 18, 1995, Jordan declared his return to the NBA and the Bulls with a two-word fax that changed sports history: “I’m back.”

“From that point on, it was like the Bulls were this American team that everybody wants to see, that everybody wants to talk to,” said Kukoc, who joined the NBA and the Bulls mere months before Jordan announced his first retirement in 1993. “I felt like we had fans literally every single arena we played.”

The reverberations of the impact of Jordan’s return echoed throughout every niche of the NBA world — from players to media to executives to fans, including LeBron James.

Hear more from those orbiting Jordan during that time in his career on the “Sports Uncovered” podcast here.