Bulls

Running timeline of the 2019 NBA Draft

Running timeline of the 2019 NBA Draft

It’s officially F5 season! The 2019 NBA Draft is going on right now (Thursday night) and the Bulls are hoping to add a significant piece to their young core. Let’s take a look at how we got here on perhaps the craziest draft night in NBA history.

The first crazy move of the night was the Atlanta Hawks trading up to grab the No. 4 overall pick, giving up quite a bit of draft capital in the process.

The strong feeling among #NBATwitter is that the Hawks will be taking Virginia forward De’Andre Hunter or Texas Tech wing Jarrett Culver to help enhance their rebuild.

This theoretically helps the Bulls grab their point guard of the future, but then Woj dropped yet another “Woj bomb”.

Darius Garland’s father Winston Garland played 73 career games with the Timberwolves, and they could be looking for a guard with Derrick Rose entering free agency. The Cleveland Cavaliers drafted point guard Collin Sexton last season but apparently still could take Garland as the best player available. Adrian Wojnarowski reported that the Cavs are looking to trade the pick, leaving the door wide open for the Bulls to trade up.

The Cavaliers, despite having 2018 No. 8 overall pick and point guard Collin Sexton on the roster, did in fact select Garland. 

Minnesota, equipped with the No. 6 pick, took Jarrett Culver to add another talented wing to their core of Andrew Wiggins and Karl-Anthony Towns. 

Chicago finally got their guy.

With Garland off the board, Chicago selected explosive scorer guard Coby White, expected to be the PG of the future. 

While White was backstage fulfilling his media obligations, he got word that his former Tar Heel running mate Cameron Johnson was selected by the Phoenix Suns at No. 11, a pick that caught most of the basketball world off guard. White was overjoyed to see Johnson get selected in the lottery, making his stellar draft night even better

The Bulls drafted White for his skills and his attitude, and he let his personality shine through with his genuine reaction to Johnson getting selected in the lottery.  

We are going to be locked in all night during this wild, wild, NBA Draft. Make sure to follow us @BullsTalk and check this post throughout the night for more updates.

Michael Jordan toy collector gives story behind the rarest of his figurines

Michael Jordan toy collector gives story behind the rarest of his figurines

The rarest Michael Jordan toy in the world you’ve probably never seen or heard of. That’s because it was never released.

Jordan Cohn and BJ Barretta of Radio.com got to the bottom of that age-old — though rarely asked about — mystery by interviewing Joshua De Vaney, the most prolific purveyor of Jordan toys in the world. 

De Vaney hails from Australia, and a perusal of his Instagram page reveals a trinket closet of staggering scale.

In the interview, De Vaney pinpointed the rarest of the bunch to be this rather unassuming batch of figurines, which were manufactured by a company called Ohio Art.

De Vaney told Radio.com they’re prototype models of a Jordan-themed H.O.R.S.E. game from 1987 that never made it to production.

“I got into contact with the Ohio Art archives department which told me… that there were only 48 of these available, and I was in possession of 33 of them at the time,” De Vaney told Cohn. “That’s when he was looking at leaving Nike. And the reason why that’s so important is because the shoe that this toy is wearing is a Nike Air Ship.”

In fact, they’re so difficult to procure that even Michael Jordan himself couldn’t get his hands on them. De Vaney told Radio.com he recently shipped one to Michael’s second-oldest son Marcus, bringing his collection from 33 to 32.

Now, as reported by Radio.com, he’s on a mission to bring his collection to the United States, and expand its platform.

“For me, it’s truly about getting my collection over to the States either to be exhibited in museums… (or) I would like to donate it to Michael,” De Vaney said in the interview. “So I’m certainly not out trying to make a dollar off of it, I would just like to give this to Michael as part of his legacy for people to enjoy.”

A noble mission, and one that will be fascinating to track, if De Vaney’s social media account is any indication of how his passion for Jordan runs.

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Breaking down the challenges and possible solutions to fan-less NBA games

Breaking down the challenges and possible solutions to fan-less NBA games

The NBA still has a long list of considerations to parse through before attempting to relaunch its season — so many, in fact, that a final resolution plan may not emerge from a highly-anticipated Board of Governors call reportedly scheduled for Friday.

This should register as a relatively low priority for now, as the league navigates an unprecedented global health and economic crisis, but the question of game presentation is one that will eventually need addressing. Without fans in arenas, silent games are a prospect that would pose unique challenges to both athletes and broadcasters — even setting aside the financial ramifications of losing gate proceeds (which, according to a recent estimate, account for 40% of the league’s revenue) through the end of this season. 

“I think it would take a little bit of competitiveness out, because obviously I think the fans and atmosphere make a big thing about the game," Zach LaVine said of the possibility of empty-arena games back on March 7.

"What is the word 'sport' without 'fan'?" LeBron James said on an episode of the Road Trippin’ podcast in March. "There's no excitement. There's no crying. There's no joy. There's no back-and-forth… That's what also brings out the competitive side of the players to know that you're going on the road in a hostile environment…”

Those grievances shouldn’t be quickly dismissed by the NBA or observers. A more engaged player population makes for a better product, and in a time of great financial strife for the league, setting a compelling scene (see: the litany of inventive playoff formats being floated) and attracting as many eyeballs as possible will be all-important.

From the broadcast side, the absence of a sonic wall separating those at home from those on the court also has the potential to soil an already precarious endeavor. For some, listening in to on-court verbal sparring could add a layer of entertainment. Sports fans, after all, are voyeuristic creatures — look to the atomic interest in “The Last Dance,” mic’d up videos and miscellaneous behind-the-scenes content as evidence of that. But to players, coaches, league officials, broadcast partners and many others, there’s potential for downside. The unfiltered sounds of NBA action aren’t exactly tailored to family viewing.

“I don’t know who I’d be more worried for, the players or referees at this point,” NBA referee Scott Foster said on NBA TV (via Tim Reynolds) when asked what challenges officiating without fans could pose. “I know I don’t want everything we normally say to each other going out. 

“I think we’re going to need to really talk about and analyze what is OK for the public to hear and how we’re going to go about our business.”

For potential solutions to the latter, the NBA could turn to leagues that have already resumed play. FOX, for example, has experimented with piping artificial crowd noise into its broadcasts of the recently-returned Bundesliga, to mixed reaction. 

At a glance, it works! There are blind spots, of course. Even with a controller toggling crowd reactions to coincide with the tenor of the match (i.e. a groundswell of sound upon a scored goal), glitches in timing could come off disingenuous, as could robotic roars for a visiting team. Pans of the stands still reveal droves of empty seats. But it restores some semblance of normalcy for those watching while mitigating against rogue vulgarities leaking into television feeds.

What it doesn’t solve is the athlete gripe. As Raphael Honigstein of The Athletic reported on Twitter, Bundesliga has not attempted funnelling that artificial noise into actual stadiums. Some teams have experimented with cardboard fans in seats in an attempt to cultivate a less apocalyptic game-night atmosphere and recoup some funds (for one match, Borussia Mönchengladbach reportedly charged 19 euro for fans to have a cutout of themselves attendance). But it feels unlikely this would satiate James’ concerns.

 

As with all matters surrounding a return bid, the NBA will need to get creative in appeasing all parties. Perhaps that means flying blind with in-arena sound experimentation. But as Sam Quinn of CBS Sports recently noted, the acoustic capacity of Disney’s ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex’s courts (which contain approximately 20,000 seats) are likely ill-equipped to handle even simulated noise equivalent to an NBA arena.

Still, don’t expect the league to settle for totally silent games on television, of which the novelty could prove fleeting and the profanity jarring. Where they ultimately turn remains to be seen, as does both the format and safety of a hypothetical resumption.

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