Bulls

Three Things to Watch: Bulls square off against Kings

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Three Things to Watch: Bulls square off against Kings

Oh yeah, it's the Bulls and Kings tonight on NBC Sports Chicago! Coverage starts at 6:30 p.m. with Bulls Pregame Live, and the game is also available to stream via the NBC Sports app

Here are three things to keep your eye on: 

1. Lottery implications?

Let's be honest: the Bulls and Kings aren't going anywhere this season. The Bulls have lost seven straight and own the league's worst point differential and the Kings are giving significant minutes to 36-year-old Zach Randolph and 40-year-old Zach Randolph. Fun players and we're glad to still see them in action, but the Warriors aren't really looking over their shoulders. Sacramento owns the second worst record in the West (Dallas) and the Bulls are worst in the East. A loss is good for both these squads, but they've played tough: the Kings just knocked off the Steph-and-KD-less Warriors.

2. But there's young talent everywhere!

Hey, just becuase both teams would rather take L's than W's these days doesn't mean there's no reason to watch. Both sides tout really special young talent, starting with Sacramento's De'Aaron Fox. The latest graduate of John Calipari's School of Point Guards, Fox is averaging 8.3 points, 3.2 assists and 1.3 steals in his last six games (five starts). Then there's Lauri Markkanen, who was selected two spots after Fox in June's NBA Draft. Willie Cauley-Stein, Bogdan Bogdanovic, Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn all make this a game to watch of what the future could hold for both squads.

3. Another back-to-back for the Bulls

Back-to-backs haven't been great for the Bulls this season, as they're 0-3 in the second halves of those sets. Most recently they lost by 30 in Utah, although it helps that this time they'll be at home: they took the Pelicans to overtime at home in their first back-to-back of the year, and two of their three wins this season have come at the United Center. Sacramento hasn't played since Tuesday, so you can bet they'll be rested and ready to roll after getting thumped at home by Giannis and the Bucks.

Scottie Pippen explains why second half of Bulls' title run was more special

Scottie Pippen explains why second half of Bulls' title run was more special

ESPN’s “The Last Dance” documentary series is going to get plenty of attention with the rest of the sports world on hold.

The series will focus on the Bulls’ final title season, 1997-98, and was recently moved up to debut on April 19.

Scottie Pippen talked about those title years for the Bulls in a recent episode of his ESPN show, “The Jump.” He explained what it was like knowing the 1997-98 season would be the team’s last run together.

“For me, it was really everything coming to a head for us,” Pippen said. “A great run through the 90s. Dennis [Rodman] had came and joined us the second half of that run, and that part was really the more special part because we were the best team in basketball for a long time, and no one knocked us off. Knowing that that was the end of our run and that we had to end it that way, we made it very special, and we wanted to end it with a championship.”

It’s noteworthy that Pippen says the second three-peat felt more special than the first. It would make sense for the team’s first title to be special because it was the breakthrough, but Pippen likes the fact that the Bulls were able to maintain their throne for so long and never lose a playoff series with a full strength team.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls easily on your device.

Dennis Rodman brushed off big-men, trash-talk and curfew during Bulls dynasty

Dennis Rodman brushed off big-men, trash-talk and curfew during Bulls dynasty

Dennis Rodman listened to the question, thought about it for a second and then started brushing his teeth.

After all, he had to catch up with World Championship Wrestling members Brian Knobbs and Jerry Sags, who had just declared the Bulls forward an honorary “Nasty Boy.”

Reporters’ notes from 24 years ago don’t shed much enlightenment on what such a title signifies. But if Rodman practiced hygiene for it — this is, after all, a player who often eschewed a postgame shower — then it must’ve been special.

Before a recent re-broadcast of this 1996 Bulls’ title run, which continues with Sunday night’s showing of Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals in Orlando, I wrote about Rodman’s “Walk of Shame.” This was the postgame routine Rodman utilized to mimic a red carpet’s entrance, walking down a hallway to answer postgame questions rather than doing so while standing in front of his locker.

Rodman mostly employed this practice at home games, which is why, on this day, he cut short his postgame media session to brush his teeth inside the visitors’ locker room.

One might surmise that Rodman’s trademark outrageousness was the story. That his play overshadowed his behavior makes it time to shift the focus back to on the court.

Man, Rodman was something for the Bulls’ second three-peat, but perhaps never more evidently than during this title run and in this series. After a nine-point, 16-rebound effort in Game 3, Rodman’s averages for the series sat at 12.3 points and 16.3 rebounds.

The Bulls held large rebounding advantages in all three victories.

Plus, what other team could largely utilize single coverage using a 6-foot-7 defender like Rodman on the 7-1 Shaquille O’Neal? In this game, O’Neal, who also matched against Luc Longley and Bill Wennington at times, managed just 17 points on 8-for-19 shooting.

“[O’Neal] can talk all the trash he wants,” Rodman said. “I think his game is totally off. I’m not going to snap either. I got people grabbing me. I got people clawing and scratching at me. It doesn’t matter. I like that.

“Shaq hit me with an elbow twice, but that’s great. I like that kind of physical play.”

Rodman said these words before going to brush his teeth and then meet his wrestler buddies. But he had one more thing to say, reminding everyone that he didn’t have a curfew.

Just when you tried to steer the focus back to Rodman’s sublime on-the-court play, he wouldn’t always let you.

Every other night through April 15, NBC Sports Chicago is airing the entirety of the Bulls' 1996 NBA championship run. Find the full schedule here.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Bulls easily on your device.