Cubs

Buzzer beater pushes Niles North to victory

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Buzzer beater pushes Niles North to victory

By Dan Shalin
YourSeason.com

Niles North junior Billy Voitik tipped in teammate Malachi Nixs missed three-pointer at the buzzer to give the visiting Vikings a dramatic 56-54 win over Glenbrook North on Friday night in Northbrook.The Vikings (13-5, 4-2) trailed by 11 points, 29-18, at halftime and by as many as 14 early in the third quarter.But Niles North stormed back and took a brief 41-40 lead in the third.Glenbrook North junior Kurt Karis hit a three-pointer at the third-quarter buzzer to put the Spartans (13-4, 4-2) up 43-41 entering the fourth.The lead went back and forth in the final quarter. The Vikings had a chance to put the game away with some late free throws, but did not convert.The contest was tied at 54-54 when Nix (team-high 18 points) launched a 35-foot three pointer in the waning seconds. He missed, but Voitik was there to be the hero.We played a great second half. It was a really disappointing in the first half, Niles North head coach Glenn Olson said. We figured some things out in the second half. It also helps when youre making shots.We had some good looks in the first half, but they didnt go down. We really challenged the kids at halftime to focus on what we believe in as a team. We were able to go out and do a much better job in the second half, and the scoreboard reflected that.Niles North hosts Mather at 6 p.m. Saturday. Glenbrook North returns to action at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday when they host Prospect.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: How long can Cubs stick with Tyler Chatwood?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: How long can Cubs stick with Tyler Chatwood?

On tonight's episode of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, Kap hosts David Haugh, Jason Goch and Rich Campbell. Tyler Chatwood's control issues continued on Tuesday. How long can the Cubs withstand his walks before needing to make a change? What's more concerning, Chatwood's control or Brandon Morrow's bad back?

Plus, the NBA Draft is two days away. How big is this for Gar Forman and John Paxson? And does Villanova's Donte DiVincenzo intrigue you at all?

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Scottie Pippen's injury history sheds light on what could be ahead for Michael Porter Jr.

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USA TODAY

Scottie Pippen's injury history sheds light on what could be ahead for Michael Porter Jr.

By now you probably know the story of Michael Porter Jr.'s back. Right as his college basketball career was starting—two minutes in to be exact—he had to sit out with back pain, which eventually developed into Porter undergoing a microdiscectomy of the L3-L4 spinal discs. The general consensus has been simple: if Porter's medicals are clean then he is a potential top-five pick, but if there is a lack of medical information or any indication that lingering issues persist, he will be available at picks six through the late lottery. Regardless of how his medical records look, what we do know is that Porter was the top-ranked player in his high school class before the eventual re-classification of Marvin Bagley. With this in mind, any team in need of serious star power—hello Bulls!—should have no problems spending a high pick on Porter, and Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen is a big reason why.

In July of 1988, Pippen has disc surgery following a rookie season that was plagued by constant back pain. During that rookie season Pippen played just over 20 minutes a night and played in a total of 79 games.

While the late 80's didn't have the help of NBA Twitter to breathe doubt into fans, there was still a running sentiment that Pippen may not be effective as he was during his initial NBA season. But in his sophomore NBA year, he almost doubled his scoring total while raising his free throw percentage from 57.6 percent to 66.8 percent. On top of this, Pippen also increased his workload by playing 33.1 minutes per game. Altogether he increased his field goal and free throw percentage each of his first four seasons in the league, all following his rookie year back surgery.

This however, should not come as a shock. In an interview with SB Nation, Dr. Charla Fischer, a spine surgeon at NYU Langone Health, stated: "Most patients tell me they feel at least 50 to 80 percent better immediately after the surgery." 

Players typically take two seasons to return to form following herniated disc surgery, and that is right in line with Pippen's first All-Star appearance in 1990, about one and a half seasons following his procedure. When you relate this back to Porter, a clearer picture of what to expect forms. Because Porter has already missed an entire season of basketball (at Missouri), it figures to take about a year for him to totally regain the explosivness that he showcased at the high school level. 

Pippen averaged 14.4 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 2.1 apg, along with a combined 1.9 stl/blks per game in the season following his back procedure. Now it would be unreasonable to expect Porter to come into the NBA performing at that level, but more so because of his lack of all-around polish more than anything else. And that is what makes Porter such a conundrum. He is a player whose game—as of now—is totally based on scoring, and his scoring is directly tied to how close he is to 100 percent. So again, developing the rest of his game in terms of passing and defense will take on everlasting importance, regardless of if he ends up with Chicago or another team. 

And while it is true that Pippen's injury history eventually caught up with him, leading to another back surgery in 1998, this was six NBA championships later. Pip went on to play six more seasons following his 1998 procedure. This included four seasons with Portland where the team routinely won around 50 games, and had a legendary battle with the Los Angeles Lakers in the 2000 Western Conference Finals.

So no matter what, Porter's first year should be looked at as one very, very long training camp. He will be in the best position to succeed if he is selected by a team willing to look at him as a long-term piece, rather than a 6-foot, 11-inch savior.