Bears

Can Bulls avoid letdown against Timberwolves?

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Can Bulls avoid letdown against Timberwolves?

Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010Posted: 2:31 p.m.

By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

Carlos Boozer cautioned against a letdown. "I don't think Minnesota cares" about whether the Bulls beat the Lakers on Friday night, said Joakim Noah.

All of the pomp and circumstance -- including a celebrity-studded crowd more reminiscent of the Staples Center -- will be gone when the Bulls face the Timberwolves on Saturday evening. This won't be a statement game, there's no revenge factor and the only challenge presented will be if Chicago can summon the same focus and energy against Minnesota, one of the league's perennial cellar-dwellers, as it could against the defending champions.

On paper, it isn't much of a matchup. Even with Michael Beasley -- once seriously debated as the No. 1 pick alongside Bulls All-Star Derrick Rose in the 2007 NBA Draft -- now playing with renewed purpose, former No. 2 draft pick (ahead of the likes of Dwyane Wade and Carmelo Anthony in the 2003 draft) and power forward Kevin Love putting up monster numbers, including a 30-point, 30-rebound game earlier in the season, the Timberwolves are clearly inferior competition.

In some respects, that makes the Bulls' job more difficult, as Wednesday's close call against Cleveland showed. But with the momentum gained from the Lakers win and the opportunity to increase their current winning streak to five games, it's unlikely that Tom Thibodeau's squad will succumb to boredom.

You see, Thibodeau consistently preaches a message of treating every game the same way. While his players admit to feeling different about certain contests (such as the Lakers game), such is the power of Thibodeau's influence that they will at least take heed to his gospel.

"At the end of the day, a Cleveland win is just as big as a Lakers win, if you look at it," said Noah after the Lakers win. "I mean, think theres a difference, if you ask me, but at the end of the year -- Thibs was trying to explain this to me because I dont really understand that concept yet -- Thibs was trying to tell me, at the end of the year, it doesnt matter because every game is just as important.

If Noah and his teammates aren't just paying lip service, then the players' concentration won't wane, regardless of the opponent. After all, if the Bulls truly hope to ascend to the NBA's elite, no game can be taken for granted.

Aggrey Sam is CSNChicago.com's Bulls Insider. Follow him @CSNBullsInsider on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bulls information and his take on the team, the NBA and much more.

Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

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Why Mitch Trubisky's biggest weakness won't preclude him from success in 2018

As the Bears set their foundation for training camp during OTAs this month, one part of that is beginning to identify each player’s strengths and weaknesses on which to build in Bourbonnais. 

Designing an offense to Mitch Trubisky’s strengths was one of the reasons why Ryan Pace hired Matt Nagy, who then hired Mark Helfrich to be his offensive coordinator. Easy is the wrong word — but it wouldn’t have made sense for the Bears to not build an offense around their second-picked quarterback. 

But as Nagy and Helfrich are installing that offense during OTAs and, next month, veteran minicamp, they’re also learning what Trubisky’s weaknesses are. And the one Helfrich pointed to, in a way, is a positive. 

“Experience,” Helfrich said. “I think it’s 100 percent experience and just reps, and that’s kind of what I was talking about was knowing why something happened. As a quarterback, he might take the perfect drop and be looking at the right guy in your progression, and that guy runs the wrong route or the left guard busts or something. The defense does something different or wrong, even. And trusting that is just a matter of putting rep on top of rep on top of rep and being confident.”

It'd be a concern if the Bears thought Trubisky lacked the necessary talent to be great, or had a lacking work ethic or bad attitude. Experience isn't something he can control, in a way. 

This isn’t anything new for Trubisky. His lack of experience at North Carolina — he only started 13 games there — was the biggest ding to his draft stock a year ago; while he started a dozen games for the Bears in 2017, the offense was simple and conservative, designed to minimize risk for Trubisky (and, to be fair, a sub-optimal group of weapons around him). 

But even if Trubisky started all 16 games in an innovative, aggressive offense last year, he’d still be experiencing plenty of things for the first time. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger made this point back in September that still resonates now with regard to Trubisky:

“I think it takes a few years until you can really get that title of understanding being great or even good, because you see so many looks,” Roethlisberger said. “In Year 2 and 3, you’re still seeing looks and can act like a rookie.”

So the challenge for Nagy and Helfrich is to build an offense that accentuates Trubisky’s strengths while managing his lack of experience. For what it’s worth, the Los Angeles Rams and Philadelphia Eagles succeeded in those efforts last year with Jared Goff and Carson Wentz, respectively. 

For Helfrich, though, one of Trubisky’s strengths — his leadership qualities — are already helping mitigate his need for more experience. 

“He’s still in the mode of learning and doing things out here,” Helfrich said. “We might have run one play 10 times against 10 different defenses, you know? And so his response to every one of those 10 things is brand new. And so, you see his reaction to some of those is good. Some of those things you want to improve upon and then keep your chest up and lead because we need that.”
 

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

Charlie Tilson plays in Detroit for first time since getting injured in his MLB debut

For over two years, Charlie Tilson was starting to look like his own version of "Moonlight" Graham, the player made famous in the movie "Field of Dreams" because he played in one major league game and never got to bat.

The White Sox traded for Tilson just before the trade deadline passed in 2016. Two days later he made his big league debut with the White Sox in Detroit. He got a single in his first at-bat, but left the game with an injury and missed the rest of the season. Tilson also missed all of the 2017 season and his MLB future was starting to come into question.

Back healthy, Tilson started this season in Triple-A Charlotte and hit .248 in 39 games when he got called up to replace Leury Garcia, who was placed on the disabled list. On Thursday, Tilson returned to a big league field for the first time in more than 20 months. He went 0-for-3 in a loss to Baltimore.

Friday marked a return to the site of Tilson's big league debut and the injury that made it such a brief stint. Tilson has now played three big league games, over the course of nearly 21 months, and two of them have been in Detroit.

Tilson went 1-for-4, meaning both his hits are in Comerica Park. The White Sox lost 5-4 after giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth.