White Sox

Caravan cruise to shut out victory over Providence

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Caravan cruise to shut out victory over Providence

By Dick Goss
Season Pass

If there is a better word than frustrating to describe what transpired Friday night at Matt Senffner Field in New Lenox, Providence coach Mark Coglianese had not found it.

The No. 18 Celtics were revved up for their regular-season and Catholic Blue finale against Mount Carmel, but six turnovers later, the No. 5 Caravan left town with a 17-0 victory.

Providence (7-2, 2-2) had second-and-goal on the Mount Carmel 1-yard line on their second possession, but quarterback Dominic Lagone had the ball leave his hands on a sneak and it fly into the end zone, where the Caravans Vincent Speller and Justin Sanchez smothered it.

Late in the first half, the Celtics were first-and-goal at the 6-yard line after a Cody Kirby-to-Chad Weaver connection on a double pass covered 47 yards. But on first down, Lagone tried to make a play when being tackled, pitching to Brandon Price (19 carries, 105 yards). It failed to connect and Speller corralled it and returned it 88 yards down the sideline for the first score with 10 seconds left in the half.

The key was to get to the ball and scoop it up and then I could score, Speller said There was nobody behind me.

It wasnt a good decision on Dominics part, Coglianese said of the errant pitch. But were not going to come down too hard on him. Hes done things like that all year and made big plays, and thats what he was trying to do.

Providence committed six turnovers in all, not to mention a costly holding penalty in the third quarter, and Mount Carmel (8-1, 3-1) eventually wore down a game Celtics defense. Ivan Strmic kicked a 37-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter and Draco Smith (22 carries, 98 yards) scored a late TD on a 3-yard run.

Providence beat us last year, Speller said. There was a lot of anger inside us.

We executed our defense. We expected to play like this. Thats what coach (Frank) Lenti wanted. It was very important that we win this one going into the playoffs.

We did a lot of good things and a lot of bad things in the first half, Coglianese said. Our defense was outstanding. But the second half was a different story. They wore us down.

And lets face it, you arent going to beat a good team like Mount Carmel when you turn the ball over. We could have been up 17-0. But we have a young team, especially on offense, and we will take something positive out of this.

Podcast: Dylan Cease raves about the White Sox farm system

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AP

Podcast: Dylan Cease raves about the White Sox farm system

Coming to you from Washington DC, we speak with Dylan Cease who competed in the MLB Futures Game along with his Birmingham Barons teammate Luis Basabe. 

Cease talks about the White Sox loaded farm system, what players have impressed him the most, where he gets his composure on the mound and more. 

Check out the entire podcast here:

Fernando Tatis Jr. is the prospect who got away: White Sox fans, read this at your own risk

Fernando Tatis Jr. is the prospect who got away: White Sox fans, read this at your own risk

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Fernando Tatis, Jr. is one of the brightest future stars in the game. MLB Pipeline ranks him as the No. 3 prospect in all of baseball, one spot behind Eloy Jimenez.

He’s a five-tool shortstop slashing .289/.359/.509 at Double-A San Antonio with 15 home runs, 42 RBIs and 15 stolen bases in 85 games. He’s bilingual, charismatic, the kind of guy who could be a face of a franchise.

And two years ago, he was property of the White Sox.

That was until they traded Tatis, who was only 17 at the time, to the Padres for James Shields. Tatis had yet to play a single game in the White Sox farm system, so it was tough to predict his future. However, speaking with Tatis before he competed in the MLB Futures Game on Sunday, the trade was definitely a shock to him.

“I was surprised. It was weird. For a kid that young to get traded, I had never heard of it. When they told me that, I couldn’t believe it. I was like, ‘What’s going on?’” Tatis said in an interview with NBC Sports Chicago.

No front office is going to bat 1.000, and when it comes to Tatis, this is a trade the White Sox would love to have back.

But first, more perspective.

In June of 2016, six months before the White Sox started their rebuild, they were 29-26, a game and a half out of first place. With Chris Sale, Jose Quintana and a healthy Carlos Rodon anchoring their rotation, they felt that with the addition of Shields, they could compete for the division.

Unfortunately, perception didn’t meet reality. Shields struggled on the mound with the White Sox in 2016 and 2017. His numbers have improved considerably, and he could return the White Sox another prospect if he’s dealt before the trade deadline. However, it’s unlikely they’ll receive a player with the potential that Tatis has right now.

“(The trade) was about getting a good starter so they could get to the playoffs. I understood. I know this game is a business,” Tatis said.

Before the trade occurred, Tatis looked into his future and saw a day when he’d be the White Sox starting shortstop.

“Yeah, that was my goal when (White Sox director of international scouting) Marco Paddy signed me,” Tatis said. “We talked about it when I started and that was the goal.”

His goal now is to make it to the major leagues with the Padres.

“I’m pretty close. I want to keep working. When they decide to call me up, I’ll be ready.”

As for his former team, he’s impressed with the talent the White Sox have assembled.

“They’re building something special. They have really good prospects. I wish the best for them.”

You can’t help but wonder what the rebuild would look like if Tatis was along for the ride. He’s the one who got away.