Bears

15 on 6: Bears need quick trigger with Cutler

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15 on 6: Bears need quick trigger with Cutler

Friday, Nov. 5, 2010
5:49 PM

By Jim Miller
CSNChicago.com

At some point, the Bears can no longer blame the system and the play calling of Mike Martz when it comes to the lack of productivity of the offense. You can either execute a timing offense, or you cannot!

It was absolutely by design that Caleb Hanie logged extra repetitions with the starting offense during the bye week. Sure, it sounds innocent enough by the Bears to say "we are just resting Jay," but there is a lot more to it than that. If Jay struggles early versus the Bills in the great white north, Hanie will see the field!

It really would be the right time to make such a bold move. Hanie played enough meaningful snaps against Carolina on the road for Lovie to think it's possible, and basically secured a victory showing he can manage the game with a lead. He displayed more poise than teammate Todd Collins, a 16-year NFL veteran, who got the nod before him and the offensive line may be in the best shape it has been in all year with the return of Roberto Garza.

Caleb would also force Martz to focus on the run game more, as even he may not trust Caleb's reactions when exposed to certain defensive alignments and coverages. Plus, Lovie has the ultimate veto power if Caleb is in the game. If it's a crucial situation, Lovie will just say "run the ball" into Martz's headset.

When I have been on the sideline with the headset on, many defensive-minded head coaches have made that call with a young QB or even with veterans, on the field.

All we have heard since Martz arrived at Halas Hall is how imperative it is that QB and receiver need to be in sync with the timing of QB drops and coinciding routes. Many I have interviewed on Sirius NFL radio, but the Chicago media has also dived into the subject. Included in this massive list are former QB's who played in a Martz system: Trent Green, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Marc Bulger, J.T. O'Sullivan, Jon Kitna - and the most telling statements - from Superbowl MVP in a Martz system, Kurt Warner.

Kurt's comment was "Jay is not comfortable in the system yet."

In my analysis, Kurt was just being kind. Losses to Seattle and Washington right before the bye can be directly related to the QB. Furthermore, if timing of the passing game is an issue, then why does your franchise QB get two days off during a bye week?

It's ok to give your starter a breather during the bye, but no starting QB in the league is shut down altogether. Normally, coaches just reduce reps or take a starter out of an inside run drill. The whole purpose of the bye week is to self scout and correct any the issues with the team.

If Jay struggles on Sunday, the Bears will have to make a decision on whether to pull him, and if Caleb showed growth and command in the system enough during the bye week to instill confidence in Lovie, then Lovie will not hesitate to make a change.

No player is above being yanked for lack of performance. Coaches may try to cover for a player like Mike Shannahan explaining why Donovan Mcnabb was pulled in Detroit for...wait.... Rex Grossman, but at the end of the day, Donovan was not pulled for his poor play in that game, it was a result of Donovan's poor performances the three weeks prior as well.

Same goes for Brett Favre in Minnesota. Brad Childress even called out the legendary QB in the post game presser. He stated "Brett should not try to play outside the offense and throw costly interceptions." Childress was very close to starting Tavaris Jackson versus the Patriots last week. Wisely, knowing how Brett responds, Childress let Brett get the start, but if he did not respond, Brad would have quickly turned to Jackson.

Arizona, Carolina, Washington, Minnesota, San Francisco, and now I would throw the Bears into this group who may have to make a change if their starting QB does not respond this weekend.

Game Plan

Run the Ball! Yes!

The Bills have allowed 200 yards or more rushing four times in the last five games and Martz is on a short leash to ensure this happens.

Greg Olsen, Where have you been? Seems all the offseason fodder about tight ends being underutilized in a Martz system has come true. Running the ball sets up play action and Bills Safety Donte Whitner has been roasted this year by opposing TE's to the tune of 37 receptions and seven touchdowns.

It's called matchups. Jay has to work these matchups. Let's keep it simple with just these two things. After all, the Bears defense only allows 17 points a game, meaning you only need 18.

No need to get too elaborate. It may throw off the timing.

Jim Miller, an 11-year former NFL quarterback, is a Comcast SportsNet Bears analyst who can be seen each week on U.S. Cellular Bears Postgame Live. Miller, who spent five seasons with the Bears, analyzes current Chicago QB Jay Cutler in his "15 on 6" blog on CSNChicago.com and can be followed on Twitter @15miller.

Raiders prepping to set the market for Tom Brady in free agency

Raiders prepping to set the market for Tom Brady in free agency

If the Bears have any interest in signing soon-to-be free-agent quarterback Tom Brady this offseason, they may have to be willing to commit beyond just the 2020 season for him.

According to longtime NFL writer Larry Fitzgerald, Sr., the Las Vegas Raiders are prepping to offer Brady a two-year, $60 million deal.

It's a steep price to pay regardless of Brady's resume largely because of his age; he'll be 43 at the start of next season. It's highly unlikely Ryan Pace would be interested in a multi-year deal for a player as close to the end as Brady, but the market will ultimately dictate what needs to be offered by teams who are serious about acquiring TB12.

If Brady wants to play beyond 2020 and is looking for a commitment from a team that extends into at least the 2021 season, his list of potential suitors is likely to shrink. But all it takes is one club willing to meet his asking price, and with Raiders coach Jon Gruden's affinity for established veteran quarterbacks, it seems like a logical match for both sides.

The Bears are expected to be aggressive in the quarterback market this offseason, whether it's via trade for someone like Bengals veteran Andy Dalton or in free agency with players like Marcus Mariota (Titans) and Teddy Bridgewater (Saints) presenting as attractive options.

Former second overall pick Mitch Trubisky has largely been a disappointment over his first three years in Chicago and is facing a make-or-break season in 2020. There's a chance he won't even begin training camp as the starter, depending on who the Bears court in free agency and the promises they make in order to sign him.

NFL free agency could be ‘potential chaos’ for available quarterbacks

NFL free agency could be ‘potential chaos’ for available quarterbacks

A plethora of NFL quarterbacks are set to hit the open market in the next few weeks in Tom Brady, Drew Brees, Dak Prescott, Philip Rivers, Teddy Bridgewater, Jameis Winston, Ryan Tannehill, Marcus Mariota and Case Keenum.

With at least nine in-demand signal-callers, the NFL could see a quarterback shakeup unparalleled in recent NFL history. According to NBC Sports’ Mike Florio, there may be “more butts than seats.”

“In this looming game of quarterback musical chairs, I still don’t think we know whether when the music stops, there’s gonna be more butts than seats, or more seats than butts,” Florio said on NBC Sports’ PFT Live. “And there’s a chance that there’s gonna be a team that is left — because they wanted too long to have something lined up — they’re gonna be left looking around saying ‘Who the hell’s our quarterback for 2020?’”

Based on that list of quarterbacks, teams that could have a QB vacancy to fill this winter include the Patriots, Cowboys, Saints, Buccaneers, Chargers and Titans. There are nine quarterbacks on that list, though Mariota and Keenum may be viewed more as backups by prospective suitors. Therefore, you could have six teams in need of a quarterback and seven on the open market.

The former figure could increase if teams like the Bears or Raiders look to upgrade the quarterback position in free agency. In that case, perhaps there are more “chairs” than “butts” this offseason, meaning some teams may find themselves without a starting quarterback entering the NFL draft.

In that scenario, a team may be inclined to trade for a QB, such as Bengals’ Andy Dalton. How this chaotic situation plays out will determined in the coming weeks, but what’s already certain is this offseason’s free agency could be a frenzy.

“We’ve never had anything even close to this, by way of potential chaos for quarterbacks in free agency and really through the draft,” Florio said. “Who knows how it’s all gonna play out? There’s gonna be a major, major shakeup, potentially. It’s gonna be somewhere between nothing changes and complete and total chaos, but I think it’s gonna be closer to complete and total chaos.”