Bears

15 on 6: Cutler must expect physical game for WR's

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15 on 6: Cutler must expect physical game for WR's

Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2010
11:39 PM

By Jim Miller
CSNChicago.com

There are great defensive matchups for both sides as the Bears (6-3) prepare to take on the Dolphins (5-4) on the road. I will focus on Jay Cutler's matchups as the Miami Dolphins have, what I believe to be, a very talented secondary.

The Bears must make this their most physical game to date. Miami is a physical team, and desire to turn every game they play into a slugfest. This will have a big impact relating to the Bears WR's who must get off the ball vs. press coverage.

Devin Hester and the rest of the wideouts must deal with Sean Smith who is a legit 6'3" and 214 lbs. and can run. Vontea Davis is no slouch either, at 5'11 and 205 lbs. Plus, Miami recently added former Green Bay Packer Al Harris - a rangy veteran at 6'3" 190 lbs., but is tremendous in bump and run coverage. I did not see him play last week and do not know his health status, but I certainly remember lining up against him. He was solid then, but I can't necessarily say he is that same player today coming off his injury.

These matchups boil down to release techniques, as corners with long arms want to slow down speedy WR's. They get up in a receivers face and do not want them to get going. At the snap of the ball, they use their long arms to hold up WR's creating a more equal playing field when dealing with foot speed.

Bears wide receivers coach Darryl Drake and Jay need to demand they win at the LOS (Line of Scrimmage). As we all know, the Bears wideouts are very young. This is where they must go back to training camp and tap into all those one-on-one sessions with a big corner like Charles Tillman or Zack Bowman.

The Washington game would be another reference where I thought the Bears receivers saw a lot of bump-and-run looks. Remember the interception by DeAngelo Hall on the slant route to Johnny Knox? They have to win those battles for Jay and the Bears to have success in the passing game.

The run game should be fine with Mike Martz's renewed commitment to balance. The Dolphins give up four yards a rush and the Bears have an opportunity to pop some big runs if Martz can dial up the right run against the right blitz. It's more about how Mike gets a feel for Dolphins defensive coordinator Mike Nolan's tenancies during the game.

It would be hard for the Dolphins to throw in something totally new on such a short week. They will call what they do well and stick with their basic blitz packages. The same can be said for the Bears offensively since there is just not enough time to work in exotic material and feel confident with the execution.

Keep calling movement plays

We all witnessed Michael Vick Monday night, and while Jay is not Mike, he has become increasingly dangerous with his legs the past two weeks. Dashes, bootlegs, waggles and playaction half rolls with seven-man protection are all great play calls to move the pocket. They also put Jay in position to be a threat to run, and he has thrown the ball extremely well on the move, at times, even better than straight dropback plays.

Lastly, Jay cannot get frustrated! As much as Jay wants receivers to win these matchups, he has to be ready to move on in his reads.

Do Not Beg them to get open! Jay's read may dictate a certain wideout must win, but coverage may delay the timing.

This should be a tight game in Miami.

Jim Miller, an 11-year former NFL quarterback, is a Comcast SportsNet Bears analyst who can be seen each week on U.S. Cellular Bears Postgame Live. Miller, who spent five seasons with the Bears, analyzes current Chicago QB Jay Cutler in his "15 on 6" blog on CSNChicago.com and can be followed on Twitter @15miller.

Under Center Podcast: Chris Simms fixes the Bears

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USA Today

Under Center Podcast: Chris Simms fixes the Bears

Laurence Holmes is joined by NBC Sports NFL analyst Chris Simms live from radio row in Miami as they try to fix the Bears. They also discuss what the Bears can learn from the San Francisco 49ers and their head coach Kyle Shanahan.

(1:57) - How to fix the Bears/Trubisky

(6:54) - What would he tell Mitchell Trubisky

(9:24) - What people don't understand about Khalil Mack

(11:44) - Kyle Shanahan is a football genius

Listen here or in the embedded player below.

Under Center Podcast

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Bears' odds to sign Teddy Bridgewater just got better

Bears' odds to sign Teddy Bridgewater just got better

When Bears GM Ryan Pace selected quarterback Mitch Trubisky with the second overall pick of the 2017 NFL Draft, he referred to future Hall-of-Famer, Drew Brees, as the kind of passer he envisioned the former North Carolina product becoming. After three underwhelming seasons under center in Chicago, Trubisky's fallen way short of those expectations. It's unclear whether he can even become an average starter at this point.

The 2020 offseason is expected to bring competition for Trubisky and it's most likely to come via free agency. Pace will have an opportunity to tap into the Brees-led Saints quarterback room to find that competition, as all three passers (Brees, Taysom Hill and Teddy Bridgewater) are scheduled to hit the open market.

The reality, however, is that only one of the three will likely be available. According to Fox Sports' Jay Glazer, it'll be Bridgewater.

RELATED: Top 30 free agents of the 2020 NFL offseason

Brees will call his own shot; if he wants to return to New Orleans, he will. And while Bridgewater played well enough to warrant a starting opportunity in 2020, he'd also serve as the perfect starter-in-waiting for the Saints. But that player is Hill, who Glazer said New Orleans views as a legitimate franchise quarterback.

This is actually great news for the Bears. Of the three Saints quarterbacks, Bridgewater would make the most sense as a target for Chicago. He'll turn 27 next season and still has several years of high-level play remaining in his arm. In the 2019 regular season, Bridgewater started five games (he went 5-0), completed nearly 68% of his passes, and threw for 1,384 yards, nine touchdowns and just two interceptions. 

Is Bridgewater an elite player? No. Is he a franchise-changing quarterback? No; but that's not what the Bears are looking for. Instead, Pace needs to sign a veteran who is consistent and reliable enough to support an elite defense with enough points to win. Trubisky's failed mightily at that, and Bridgewater proved in relief of Brees in 2019 that he's not only capable of it, but he can thrive in that role.

Bridgewater's projected market value is a three-year, $60.1 million deal (or $20 million per season) per Spotrac. It may seem like a lot of money to pay to a quarterback whose signing wouldn't come along with a guaranteed starting job, but when combined with Trubisky's $9.3 million salary in 2020, as long as the Bears receive quality play from whoever their starting quarterback is, the cost will be in line with those teams that have respected starters on their payroll.

It's possible Bridgewater won't sign with a team that doesn't promise him the starting job. But is a promise even needed with Trubisky being the only roadblock in Bridgewater's way? It wouldn't take long for him to distance himself at the top of the depth chart, and maybe, once and for all, the Bears can enjoy some Saints-like quarterback play. 

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