Bears

Bears looking beyond rookies for defensive boost

Bears looking beyond rookies for defensive boost

With only one 2017 draft choice spent on defense, and that player — Alabama safety Eddie Jackson, fourth round — being held out as part of rehab from a broken leg suffered last October, the defensive report on this weekend’s rookie minicamp would be ... well ... maybe later.

More to the bigger Bears point than the influx of rookies is the virtual tsunami of veteran players that point to likely no fewer than six new starters from the lineup that finished the 2016 season.

The number might have been as high as seven but middle linebacker Danny Trevathan’s return from a ruptured patellar tendon, suffered in the Nov. 27 loss to the Tennessee Titans, is problematic at this point.

“I think that's in question whether he'll be ready [by training camp] at that point,” defensive coordinator Vic Fangio said.

But the defense, which stumbled badly when nose tackle Eddie Goldman was out with an ankle injury, has added two starting cornerbacks – Prince Amukamara and Marcus Cooper — plus a starting safety – Quintin Demps — and added mass on the defensive line with Jaye Howard and John Jenkins.

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The key, however, projects to be Leonard Floyd, whose otherwise standout rookie season (7 sacks) was hampered by two concussions and a total of four missed games.

“He’s got a foundation of a year behind him, and he was only available about half the time last year,” Fangio said. “He had a bunch of those little injuries that interrupted his progress throughout the season. Hopefully with the year under his belt, getting in better shape, better condition, and take off. If he stays healthy, I feel good about him.

“He had a nice stretch there. I don’t remember the exact games, maybe it was like Game 9-12 where he was practicing and playing and you could see him coming. Then he got dinged twice in the last two games, or the last four games and it interrupted again.”

The Bears did not pick up the fifth-year option on cornerback Kyle Fuller, a distinct longshot after missing all of 2016 with a knee injury and clearly not a favorite of this coaching staff. But Fangio is declaring “competition,” which could give Fuller a shot at restarting a career that has faltered badly.

“Absolutely, I mean, it's wide open,” Fangio said. “I hope to see Kyle healthy and out there running around. Moving like he's 100 percent, and we'll go from there.”

Bears, Mitch Trubisky trolled after Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs agree to deal

Bears, Mitch Trubisky trolled after Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs agree to deal

Sometimes the best way to get yourself through a tough time is to laugh it off. They say laughter is the best medicine after all.

So when Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs reportedly agreed to a record-breaking contract extension, it's no surprise that many people took to Twitter to clown the Bears.

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Warning: do not scroll further unless you have the ability to laugh at a sad situation.

After all of that, this may be how all Bears fans feel on Twitter:

Ok, now that we’re through with the put downs, how about a little highlight to help the healing:

RELATED: Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

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Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

Pat Mahomes officially woke up on Tuesday as the highest paid athlete in pro sports history. 

It's especially impressive to think about considering that Mahomes didn't even start a full season until 2018. In just two years since he's been able to win a Super Bowl, league MVP, and secure close to $500 million. How did this all happen so quickly? Mahomes' agent Leigh Steinberg – who presumably set his own field's commission record on Monday, too – sat down with the Under Center Podcast back during Super Bowl media week to talk about it: 

I think so much of it was growing up with a baseball player as a father, and watching the nature of ephemeral fame and how it comes and goes. It's all about being grounded, and in this moment, and not thinking about anything except focusing on this. But also having some fun with it. We're here on Radio Row, and happens is that you have so much coverage of the Super Bowl, that if a player performs dramaticlly, they cross over out of the narrow genre of hardcore sports fans. They become an American icon.

Steinberg also (briefly) discusses Mahomes' contract negotiations and how much the Chiefs' QB benefited from sitting behind Alex Smith for a year in 2017. You can listen to the entire conversation with Laurence Holmes right here, or in the embedded player below: