Bears

Bears signing of Rueben Randle has some curious elements

Bears signing of Rueben Randle has some curious elements

The Bears' signing of former New York Giant and No. 2 draft pick Rueben Randle to a reserve/futures contract on Tuesday was a small tell that the Bears indeed will pull just about any lever to effect a roster upgrade. But Randle is a curious case — they had a chance to sign him anytime last season and didn't — and there's a teeny shred of "this sounds kinda familiar" to it.
 
Roy Williams. Brandon Marshall. Now Randle? All part of a group that looks every bit the part — and then teams find out why they were available in the first place.
 
Randle was the 63rd player taken in the 2012 draft, 18 picks after the Bears under GM Phil Emery traded up in in the second round to grab Alshon Jeffery and already had dealt away two No. 3's to acquire Marshall. "Enigmatic" would be a fair descriptor for all three receivers.

[SHOP: Gear up Bears fans!]
 
Randle piled up 188 receptions, 2,644 yards and 20 touchdowns in his four seasons with the Giants, and started 33 of 64 games. But two NFL personnel men described Randle as a head case who runs lousy routes and was never where he was supposed to be, which did not sit well with quarterback Eli Manning. Consensus was that the Giants would've dumped Randle if he hadn't been someone's No. 2 draft pick.
 
Signing Randle at this point, after he was out of football all year following his failure to stick with Philadelphia past the 75 round of cuts, is intriguing. The Bears brought him to Halas Hall for a workout in late November but chose not to sign him despite a wideout-lite lineup that was without Jeffery (suspended) and Kevin White (injured), had Deonte Thompson starting, and proceeded to drop 10 passes the following game vs. Tennessee.
 
A reserve/futures contract assures the Bears a longer look at Randle this offseason, at a time when their receivers depth chart is in flux, with Jeffery coming out of his franchise tag, Eddie Royal unlikely to return after two injury-riddled seasons and Marquess Wilson a free agent but coming off a fractured foot.

The Bears-Chiefs game may be flexed out of Week 16 Sunday Night Football

The Bears-Chiefs game may be flexed out of Week 16 Sunday Night Football

If you’re a Bears fan traveling the weekend of December 21st, you may want to check and see if your plans are adjustable. According to WGN's Adam Hoge, the Bears have the potential to be flexed out of Sunday Night Football for their Week 16 matchup against the 9-4 Kansas City Chiefs.

The move hinges on how the Bears play this coming Sunday against the current NFC North leading Green Bay Packers. If the Bears break our hearts this holiday season and lose to the Packers, effectively eliminating them from this post-season, they could lose the December 22nd SNF slot to the New Orleans Saints and the Tennessee Titans.

The NFL implemented flexible scheduling to primetime in 2006 to ensure quality matchups during SNF, allowing teams to earn their way into primetime slots. The NFL usually has to give at least 12-days notice if they decide to make the switch, which becomes more flexible towards the end of the season.

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Projected 2020 NFL salary cap is good news for the Bears

Projected 2020 NFL salary cap is good news for the Bears

The NFL informed all 32 teams on Tuesday that the 2020 salary cap will increase to between $196.8 million and $201.2 million, according to NFL Network's Ian Rapoport. The increased cap figure is a bit of good news for the Bears, who are one of six teams with more than $200 million committed to its roster in 2020.

The salary cap for 2019 was set at $188.2 million.

More money means more flexibility for GM Ryan Pace in free agency. And while the Bears still don't project as one of the major players on the open market this year, they'll certainly have enough spending power to add second-tier free agents and possibly a starter along the lines of Ha Ha Clinton-Dix's addition last year.

There are some player contracts Pace may want to take a closer look at this offseason, too. Wide receiver Taylor Gabriel, for example, has a $6.5 million cap hit in 2020 but represents just a $2 million dead cap figure if the Bears part ways with him. It's a quick $4.5 million in extra spending money that Pace could decide is critical for a must-have free agent. Plus, with the group of talented and young receivers already on Chicago's roster, a player like Gabriel may no longer be needed.

And what about cornerback Prince Amukamara? Sure, the veteran defensive back is a valuable starter, but cheaper options could be available on the open market. Plus, the Bears may have found his future replacement in Kevin Tolliver. Cutting Amukamara would free up $9 million in cap space (he has a $1 million dead-cap figure).

This is the funny thing about the salary cap. It's pliable. Pace can manipulate the numbers to add a big-name free agent even as we enter an offseason that appears ominous for the Bears' cap situation.

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