Bears

Bears trade up and get their quarterback: North Carolina's Mitchell Trubisky

Bears trade up and get their quarterback: North Carolina's Mitchell Trubisky

General manager Ryan Pace said Wednesday the Bears had come to a consensus on the three best players available in this year’s NFL Draft. One of those players, as it turned out, was North Carolina quarterback Mitchell Trubisky. 

The Bears traded the Nos. 3, 67 and 111 picks, as well as a 2018 third-round pick, to the San Francisco 49ers in exchange for the second overall pick. 

Here's what Pro Football Focus wrote on Trubisky:

"Despite being a one-year starter, Trubisky is very polished as a passer playing with good balance and consistent mechanics, which leads him to throw with great accuracy in the short/intermediate passing game. Although he comes from a version of the spread in his college offense, he was asked to do many full field progressions and showed he can click from receiver to receiver quickly and efficiently. Has very good pocket instincts and ability to keep eye level up to see receivers down the field while moving within the pocket. His three-quarters release may lead to more batted balls at the LOS but is likely not a huge issue at the next level. Will need to work on hitting his deep shots with more consistent accuracy to keep defenses from sitting at the break point. Shows all of the tools to develop into a very solid NFL starting quarterback and appears to be the safest option of the 2017 quarterback draft class."

Trubisky completed 68.2 percent of his passes for 3,767 yards with 30 touchdowns and six interceptions in 2016 with North Carolina. The 6-foot-2, 222 pound Ohio native is the sixth quarterback to be taken by the Bears in the top five in franchise history:

Sid Luckman (1939, No. 2 overall)
Bob Williams (1951, No. 2 overall)
Bobby Layne (1948, No. 3 overall)
Johnny Lujack (1946, No. 4 overall)
Jim McMahon (1982, No. 5 overall)

How worried should the Bears be about Mitch Trubisky?

How worried should the Bears be about Mitch Trubisky?

Few positions in sports have the kind of expectations that come along with being a quarterback who's selected in the first round. Those expectations are elevated the higher a quarterback is selected in the first round, so in the case of Mitchell Trubsisky, who the Bears traded up to the second overall pick to select in 2017, it's safe to say failure is not an option for No. 10.

Unfortunately, Trubisky hasn't had much success in more than two seasons and 31 starts as a Bear. He bottomed out against the Saints in Sunday's 36-25 loss when he looked more like an undrafted free agent than a blue-chip first-rounder. His completions were a collection of meaningless dinks and dunks, and whenever he did take a shot downfield, his passes sailed off target and, in some instances, dangerously close to being intercepted.

It was bad. And what's worse? There's no indication that it will get better any time soon. Trubisky hasn't had that 'wow' moment in 2019, sans the 36-yard touchdown pass to Taylor Gabriel in Week 3, to suggest he's even capable of being an average starter in the NFL. It's true quarterbacks take time to develop, and it would be foolish for the Bears to move on from Trubisky with 10 games of evaluation remaining on their schedule, but it certainly feels like GM Ryan Pace is staring down an offseason that will require adding a quarterback in free agency or the NFL draft.

It would be negligent for Pace to ignore the position after what we've seen in 2019. Even if Trubisky has a strong finish to the season, the Bears need a better backup plan than Chase Daniel, who coach Matt Nagy said he never considered playing Sunday despite Trubisky's struggles. Maybe, if Chicago had a quarterback with more upside behind Trubisky, Nagy would've made the switch. This offense needs that flexibility moving forward, even if that means Trubisky moves to QB2 to begin 2020.

The quarterback situation is bad; maybe as bad as it was before Jay Cutler arrived in Chicago in 2009. According to the Athletic's NFL Panic index, it's downright awful.

Trubisky’s deficiencies, and the Bears’ fundamental offensive issues, were even more glaring against the Saints, a team that still has creative offensive play design (hello, fullback option with No. 3 quarterback Taysom Hill) and explosive plays without Drew Brees and other key offensive players, like running back Alvin Kamara and tight end Jared Cook. No, this is the quarterback the Bears picked and the head coach and play caller, Matt Nagy, they picked to develop him. And yet, the Bears, Trubisky and the offense are worse now than they were a year ago.

The swell of doubt around Trubisky and the Bears offense will only continue growing as this disappointing season marches on. Chicago faces the struggling Chargers in Week 8 and should (emphasis on should) be able to get back on a winning track. But they have to do it with some big plays on offense that are the result of a young quarterback who's ready to put this team on his back. Otherwise, it'll soon be time to scout next year's crop of NFL draft hopefuls.

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Tarik Cohen: 'Ya'll act like I don't know I'm short'

Tarik Cohen: 'Ya'll act like I don't know I'm short'

One of the few memorable moments from the Bears offense in Sunday's 36-25 loss to the New Orleans Saints was actually something running back Tarik Cohen, and vertically-challenged Bears fans across the country, would like to forget.

With less than five minutes remaining in the game, Cohen caught a pass out of the backfield that resulted in a short gain (no pun intended). To his credit, Cohen trucked Saints defensive back Chauncey Gardner-Johnson before being thrown to the ground and, as Cohen's known to do from time to time, began barking at New Orleans coach Sean Payton and those Saints defenders.

Gardner-Johnson responded by mocking Cohen's 5-6 frame.

Cohen, who's used the doubt about his size as a motivator throughout his career, seemed unfazed by it all.

It seems to me like Gardner-Johnson, who Cohen ran over and was the principle trash-talker, may have done so to salvage some of the pride that Cohen knocked from his bigger frame.

Kudos to Cohen for taking it all in stride and for continuing to be one of the Bears' most important players on and off the field.