Bears

#BearsTalk Pick Six: What are the important storylines for veteran minicamp?

#BearsTalk Pick Six: What are the important storylines for veteran minicamp?

This week’s mandatory three-day minicamp at Halas Hall  closes out the Bears’ official off-season program. Once practice concludes Thursday afternoon, the players are on their own for six weeks before reporting to training camp in Bourbonnais Wednesday, July 26, with the first practice expected a day later.
 
Here’s are a six-pack of storylines CSN's Chris Boden and JJ Stankevitz will be especially keeping their eyes on:

1. Roll Call

Only three of the Bears’ 10 Organized Team Activities over the past three weeks were open to the media. A good portion of the roster was out on the field each day we were allowed to witness the workouts at Halas Hall. 

But there were other times a handful of key players were either nowhere to be seen, or off to the side working with the training staff. How much from a group that includes the likes of Josh Sitton, Hroniss Grasu, Markus Wheaton, Zach Miller, Eddie Goldman, Jaye Howard, Leonard Floyd, Pernell McPhee, Willie Young and Eddie Jackson will be taking part, from individual drills to 11-on-11? If not every day, any days? And is it because of the coaching staff is playing things cautiously, due to the bad injury track record the past two years, or from setbacks, or something new? 

We won’t get definitive answers on that from John Fox, who’s said the primary objective is to get everyone ready to go by training camp, or the regular season. Mark Sanchez, Cam Meredith, Danny Trevathan and Kyle Long are not expected to be taking part when the offense and defense line up opposite each other. And based on the forecasted temperatures in the 90’s, it wouldn’t be a surprise to reduce risk by working out inside the Payton Center.
— Chris Boden

2. Mike Gennon’s command of the offense

By all accounts, Mike Glennon hasn’t wavered in taking command of the Bears offense since Mitch Trubisky was drafted in April. His “this is my year” line was a public declaration of the approach he’s taken with his teammates, which has been roundly praised before and after April’s draft. This week will be Glennon’s last opportunity to build on-field trust with his teammates before July, but he’ll likely use the six-week summer break to keep building relationships off the field, too. 
— JJ Stankevitz

3. ”Tru” at No. 2               

It’s hard to think Ryan Pace and the coaching staff will stray from their plan to begin the season with the second overall draft pick sitting third on the quarterback depth chart. But with Sanchez sidelined, Mitch Trubisky at least has an opportunity to make them think otherwise. No, he won’t be going up against an angry opponent’s number-one defense that’s scheming to rattle the rookie. But you’d have to think Dowell Loggains (and Vic Fangio) will try to push and challenge the quarterback of the future, who’ll get consistent work with teammates projected to be higher up the depth chart. Should he impress, it won’t change minds of the position pecking order heading to Bourbonnais, but Trubisky showing he’s a quicker study than expected could at least open the door slightly more to that possibility. 
— Chris Boden

4. Where does Kevin White fit?

Among the “ifs” on the Bears’ roster — and there are many — Kevin White may be the biggest. The 2015 No. 7 pick has only played four games in the last two years, but if he can be the guy the Bears (and plenty of draft analysts) thought he was coming out of West Virginia, he’ll go a long way toward replacing Alshon Jeffery. The importance of veteran minicamp for White is mostly just getting him reps, even if pads and contact aren’t involved, as he continues to build his way back from those two leg injuries. 
— JJ Stankevitz

5. The first thing for the secondary

For a secondary with four offseason additions — cornerbacks Marcus Cooper and Prince Amukamara, and safeties Quintin Demps and Eddie Jackson — OTAs have mostly been important for developing trust and chemistry within the unit. This is a group that will be tasked with creating more turnovers than last year’s total of 11 (tied for the lowest in a single season in NFL history), and the process of developing that takeaway-focused mentality began during the offseason program. For the new players and the holdovers from last year, learning everyone’s strengths and weaknesses now will help get this group on solid footing heading into training camp in July. 
— JJ Stankevitz

6. The “baby” Bear       

So Cam Meredith and Zach Miller have injuries they’re working their way back from, Kevin White still has to prove himself going into Year 3, and the last thing you want to do is put Jordan Howard through any more work than needed before Sept.10. Now’s a good time to start seeing how 5-foot-6 waterbug Tarik Cohen can be utilized, whether it’s coming out of the backfield, split out wide or in the slot. This offense needs weapons and diversity even when everyone is healthy. Cohen has the potential to supply that, provided he can evade and outrun defenses at the NFL level like he did at North Carolina A&T.  (And by the way, he wouldn’t like being called baby Bear. It’s used for these title purposes only. He’s used his size as a chip on his shoulder to become a fourth-round draft pick.) 
— Chris Boden

Bears, Mitch Trubisky trolled after Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs agree to deal

Bears, Mitch Trubisky trolled after Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs agree to deal

Sometimes the best way to get yourself through a tough time is to laugh it off. They say laughter is the best medicine after all.

So when Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs reportedly agreed to a record-breaking contract extension, it's no surprise that many people took to Twitter to clown the Bears.

Click to download the MyTeams App for the latest Bears news and analysis.

Warning: do not scroll further unless you have the ability to laugh at a sad situation.

After all of that, this may be how all Bears fans feel on Twitter:

Ok, now that we’re through with the put downs, how about a little highlight to help the healing:

RELATED: Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

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Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

Patrick Mahomes' unprecedented rise to NFL stardom can be explained quite simply

Pat Mahomes officially woke up on Tuesday as the highest paid athlete in pro sports history. 

It's especially impressive to think about considering that Mahomes didn't even start a full season until 2018. In just two years since he's been able to win a Super Bowl, league MVP, and secure close to $500 million. How did this all happen so quickly? Mahomes' agent Leigh Steinberg – who presumably set his own field's commission record on Monday, too – sat down with the Under Center Podcast back during Super Bowl media week to talk about it: 

I think so much of it was growing up with a baseball player as a father, and watching the nature of ephemeral fame and how it comes and goes. It's all about being grounded, and in this moment, and not thinking about anything except focusing on this. But also having some fun with it. We're here on Radio Row, and happens is that you have so much coverage of the Super Bowl, that if a player performs dramaticlly, they cross over out of the narrow genre of hardcore sports fans. They become an American icon.

Steinberg also (briefly) discusses Mahomes' contract negotiations and how much the Chiefs' QB benefited from sitting behind Alex Smith for a year in 2017. You can listen to the entire conversation with Laurence Holmes right here, or in the embedded player below: