Bears

Did Brandon Marshall disrespect Jay Cutler with Hall of Fame shade?

Did Brandon Marshall disrespect Jay Cutler with Hall of Fame shade?

Brandon Marshall is no stranger to keeping it real.

The outspoken All-Pro receiver never minces his words and that continued over the weekend when he showed off his signed jersey collection.

Marshall took to Instagram and showed off "Santa" hanging all of the jerseys he's swapped with other NFL players:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVx46t2BULU/

The list includes a host of current and future Hall of Fame players: Champ Bailey, Cris Carter, John Lynch, Darrelle Revis, Lance Briggs, Adam Vinatieri, Adrian Peterson, Larry Fitzgerald, Joe Thomas.

When almost all the framed jerseys were hung, Marshall took his followers through:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVx8QpQBv9D/

Marshall compliments each player before, calling them "Hall of Famers" before getting to Jay Cutler at the end and going "Hall of..." multiple times.

Was that Marshall throwing shade at his former quarterback in both Denver and Chicago? If it was an innocent mistake or whatever, there's no way Marshall would've posted the Instagram video, right?

Marshall and Cutler were good friends from the beginning of their careers with the Broncos. So much so that the Bears traded a pair of third round draft picks in March 2012 to allow the two to continue their bromance by the lake:

But Marshall and Cutler have had a contentious relationship since.

Last summer, Marshall responded to a Tweet saying "of course" he misses Cutler. Last August, Marshall hopped on ESPN's First Take and said he thought Cutler could win the MVP Award in the 2016 NFL season.

At the same time, Marshall talked about his relationship with Cutler and said he was the only person on the Bears with the "huevos" to hold the enigmatic quarterback accountable. Marshall also said he was "sad" he didn't talk to Cutler much in the year leading up to August 2016.

Soldier Field to host drive-in movie screenings through July

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NBC Sports Chicago

Soldier Field to host drive-in movie screenings through July

You're probably not going to be able to watch the Bears at Soldier Field any time soon, but next week you'll be able to watch a movie there! That's kind of the same! 

That's because a program called 'Chi-Togther' "will provide Music Entertainment and Movie Screenings each night that will also include carpool-style concerts plus food and beverage options for all ages."

The event will be held in Soldier's South lot, and anyone who signs up will get a free popcorn! Honestly, it's worth it  just to get out of the house and grab yourself some free kernels. 

Movies being screened include Groundhog Day, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and Fast and Furious (hell yeah). Also Shrek. 

12 greatest Chicago Bears wins in Soldier Field history

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USA TODAY

12 greatest Chicago Bears wins in Soldier Field history

The Chicago Bears franchise celebrated 100 years of football last season but there are a few more notable anniversaries on the horizon.

Next year will mark the 50th anniversary of Bears football at Soldier Field. And the columned stadium itself, which opened in 1924, is nearing the century mark.

While the franchise played a vast majority of their home games at Wrigley Field in its early years, a smattering of contests took place at the lakefront facility. The first of which was a 10-0 win over the Chicago Cardinals on Nov. 11, 1926. 

The Bears moved away from Wrigley Field after the 1970 campaign, landing at the AstroTurfed Soldier Field the following season. The team’s first game there — as official tenants — gave the franchise a positive jolt. A late Kent Nix touchdown pass gave the Bears a 17-15 victory over coach Chuck Noll’s Pittsburgh Steelers in front of a capacity crowd. The win was one of the bright spots in an otherwise pedestrian 6-8 season.

Alas, there were better days ahead.

Let’s take a look back at the 12 greatest Bears wins at Soldier Field:

12 greatest Bears wins in Soldier Field history