Bears

Eddie Jackson healthy, ready to bring center fielder range to Bears' secondary

Eddie Jackson healthy, ready to bring center fielder range to Bears' secondary

Eddie Jackson’s senior year at Alabama was cut short by a broken leg, but the Bears’ fourth-round pick doesn’t expect that injury to affect him in 2017. 

Jackson suffered his injury Oct. 22 returning a punt against Tennessee and missed the rest of Alabama’s season. 

“I’m just ready to get there and work with the training staff at the Bears,” Jackson said. “I know I’m gonna be ready for training camp 100 percent, no limitations.”

When healthy, Jackson was an electric playmaker — nine interceptions, 12 pass breakups and five total touchdowns — who worked initially as a cornerback and later as a safety at Alabama. Two of those scores came in 2016 as a punt returner, a position where he could make an immediate impact for the Bears.

“(The Bears) told me they liked me as a returner,” Jackson, who averaged 23 yards per punt return, said. “That’s one of the things they want to try me at, or see how well I do. All I’ve got to say is I’m just ready to come in and compete and work. You know, take advantage of every opportunity that’s given to me right now.”

Jackson moreso fits a Bears need as a rangy free safety, though he wasn’t a sure tackler with 16 missed tackles in 122 attempts from 2014-2016, according to Pro Football Focus. In addition to those nine interceptions (six of which came in his junior year), Jackson broke up 12 passes in four years, and in 2016, he limited opposing quarterbacks to a 38.3 passer rating when they threw his way. 

And Jackson turned three of his interceptions into touchdowns. For some context: Malik Hooker, the Colts’ 15th overall pick who was regarded as the best “center fielder” safety prospect this year, had three touchdowns on seven college interceptions. 

“When I get the ball, I feel like I turn into a receiver,” Jackson said. “It’s my mindset. I don’t think about going out of bounds, or think about going down, I think about touchdowns.”

The Bears only intercepted eight passes as a team last year, a void the team began to address with the signing of Quintin Demps (six interceptions in 2016) in March. Jackson will push Adrian Amos, who doesn’t have an interception in over 1,800 career plays. 

“I just feel like wherever I’m needed I can do it all,” Jackson said. “I’ll have good coaching they can teach me what I need to be taught and they talked to me about playing safety and special teams. I’m just looking forward to come out there and earn a spot and hopefully take us to a Super Bowl. It’s possible.”

The Bears-Chiefs game may be flexed out of Week 16 Sunday Night Football

The Bears-Chiefs game may be flexed out of Week 16 Sunday Night Football

If you’re a Bears fan traveling the weekend of December 21st, you may want to check and see if your plans are adjustable. According to WGN's Adam Hoge, the Bears have the potential to be flexed out of Sunday Night Football for their Week 16 matchup against the 9-4 Kansas City Chiefs.

The move hinges on how the Bears play this coming Sunday against the current NFC North leading Green Bay Packers. If the Bears break our hearts this holiday season and lose to the Packers, effectively eliminating them from this post-season, they could lose the December 22nd SNF slot to the New Orleans Saints and the Tennessee Titans.

The NFL implemented flexible scheduling to primetime in 2006 to ensure quality matchups during SNF, allowing teams to earn their way into primetime slots. The NFL usually has to give at least 12-days notice if they decide to make the switch, which becomes more flexible towards the end of the season.

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Projected 2020 NFL salary cap is good news for the Bears

Projected 2020 NFL salary cap is good news for the Bears

The NFL informed all 32 teams on Tuesday that the 2020 salary cap will increase to between $196.8 million and $201.2 million, according to NFL Network's Ian Rapoport. The increased cap figure is a bit of good news for the Bears, who are one of six teams with more than $200 million committed to its roster in 2020.

The salary cap for 2019 was set at $188.2 million.

More money means more flexibility for GM Ryan Pace in free agency. And while the Bears still don't project as one of the major players on the open market this year, they'll certainly have enough spending power to add second-tier free agents and possibly a starter along the lines of Ha Ha Clinton-Dix's addition last year.

There are some player contracts Pace may want to take a closer look at this offseason, too. Wide receiver Taylor Gabriel, for example, has a $6.5 million cap hit in 2020 but represents just a $2 million dead cap figure if the Bears part ways with him. It's a quick $4.5 million in extra spending money that Pace could decide is critical for a must-have free agent. Plus, with the group of talented and young receivers already on Chicago's roster, a player like Gabriel may no longer be needed.

And what about cornerback Prince Amukamara? Sure, the veteran defensive back is a valuable starter, but cheaper options could be available on the open market. Plus, the Bears may have found his future replacement in Kevin Tolliver. Cutting Amukamara would free up $9 million in cap space (he has a $1 million dead-cap figure).

This is the funny thing about the salary cap. It's pliable. Pace can manipulate the numbers to add a big-name free agent even as we enter an offseason that appears ominous for the Bears' cap situation.

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