Bears

End of an era: Bears release Jay Cutler

End of an era: Bears release Jay Cutler

The long-anticipated departure of Jay Cutler from Chicago came to pass on Thursday as the Bears released Cutler, and sources tell CSNChicago.com that the New York Jets could be in the mix to sign Cutler. The action ended an eight-year Cutler run with the Bears that saw one playoff trip and victory, and a near-constant argument over what the Bears had done when they traded draft picks and Kyle Orton to the Denver Broncos in 2009 for what they hoped would continue to be a Pro Bowl quarterback.
 
Cutler exits as one of the most polarizing figures in Chicago sports history, certainly among Bears fans but also among teammates, with whom he had various dustups over his eight Bears seasons.

"I appreciate Jay's professionalism throughout this process and throughout my two years with him here in Chicago," Bears general manager Ryan Pace said in a press release. "I will always appreciate his toughness and respect his accomplishments on the field with the Bears. He leaves here holding every passing record with this storied franchise and I wish him nothing but the best."

Bears chairman George McCaskey added: "We are grateful to Jay for all he did as a Bear. His ability, toughness, and intelligence were on daily display at Halas Hall and Soldier Field. He had an extraordinary impact off the field, doing things for people — especially kids — without expecting or wanting any recognition. I was and am a big fan of his. We wish Jay, Kristin and their three kids all the best."
 
The 2016 season, even more than 2015, had been a prove-it year for Cutler in large measure because it was the final season that contained any guaranteed money. And as coaches consistently state, players generally make their decisions for them. With his health and performance, Cutler ultimately made this decision a fait accompli.
 
Besides two different injuries happening, Cutler regressed in ball security, with his interception percentage spiking back up to 3.6 from 2.3, his completion percentage falling below 60 and only one of five starts with a passer rating above 82.
 
And as it had with Alshon Jeffery, durability and injury history became factors. Since coming to the Bears, Cutler played all 16 games just once (2009) at age 34, Cutler's physical vulnerabilities were only going increase, not decrease. From 2009-16 Cutler missed as many games (26) as Tony Romo, one of the unfortunate benchmarks for injury issues at quarterback. Cutler underwent shoulder surgery for a torn labrum suffered last season, raising more recent and significant red flags about both his present and future.
 
Mismanagement styles
 
The 2009 trade to acquire Cutler could be and was heavily debated. In hindsight the Bears did not two No. 1's worth of on-field value for Cutler but the organization went aggressively after what it viewed as a huge upgrade at the the single most important position in team sports.
 
But once Cutler hit town, how the management handled him both on and off the field was mystifying and misguided, nowhere more glaringly obvious than committing a seven-year contract to a proven mid-level quarterback. 
 
GM Phil Emery subsequently floated the bizarre narrative that, coming off a so-called breakout offensive year under Marc Trestman, particularly with much of the success coming when Josh McCown ran the offense, the Bears needed to show evidence of a commitment to Cutler; hence the massive contract rather than a one-year franchise tag. But the season was hardly "breakout," and the offense averaged nearly 50 more passing yards per game in starts by McCown (308.6) than with Cutler (259.3).
 
Cutler's history instead suggested that prove-it tough love was a better management approach. Cutler had responded to his surprise extension after five Bears games in 2009 with the highest interception total and lowest passer rating of his career. When Emery lavished the term "franchise quarterback" on him in 2012, Cutler's production was among the lowest of his Chicago seasons.
 
And 2014, after the contract move, was an unmitigated disaster for the team and organization, despite Cutler proclaiming at the time of his contract-signing in January, "The mindset is right and the talent in the locker room is right."
 
However, compared to the approaches of Emery and Jerry Angelo before them, neither John Fox nor Pace offered endorsements of Cutler as their quarterback immediately after their hirings. More pointedly, Gase prefaced his decision on Cutler with contacting various Cutler coaches, seeking to discern what had and hadn't worked with the enigmatic quarterback over the Chicago years. The result was Adam Gase lobbying hard to stay with Cutler and going to a simplified decision-making scheme for Cutler, who then produced the best passing season of his career.

That season included the Bears re-committing to balanced offense, 47 percent run in 2014 from 37 percent under Trestman. But under Dowell Loggains the offense ran on just 39.5 percent of the plays, not a formula proven to work for Cutler, or Brian Hoyer, either, for that matter.
 
Recurring O.C. issues – cause or effect of Cutler?
 
Whether that was a cause or an effect of Cutler's oft-disappointing and middling level of play, Cutler's career has been marked by a veritable turnstile of offensive coordinators. For various different reasons, Cutler unquestionably clashed and clashed hard with his early Bears bosses.
 
Ron Turner was coordinator under Lovie Smith when Cutler was acquired. Turner and Cutler had bad history dating back to when Turner was coach at Illinois and Cutler believed Turner rescinded a scholarship offer. Turner denied that the scholarship had been offered but subsequently admitted errors in handling of Cutler with the Bears, assuming more of the quarterback than was really there after three NFL seasons in Denver.
 
"With Jay's talent, probably the mistake I made early with him is that I probably did try to do too much, and then cut back on it as we went, and I think he got better," Turner told ESPN last year. "But, yeah, probably a little too much, too early."

[STATS: Jay Cutler left his mark in the Bears record books]
 
Turner was gone after 2009, replaced by Mike Martz. The former Rams head coach simplified the game, taking audibles away from Cutler, who produced the best year-and-a-half stretch of his career.
 
But Cutler was constantly battered under Martz's pass-heavy schemes. His irritation boiled over and was ultimately captured on film during an Oct. 16, 2011 game vs. Minnesota yelling, "Tell him to [expletive] himself!" toward the sideline, referring to Martz. Cutler's season ended a month later with a thumb injury and Martz was fired at the end of that season.
 
Smith then promoted offensive line coach Mike Tice to coordinator and the Bears streaked to a 7-1 start. But Cutler suffered a concussion in a loss to Houston, missed the next game, and his relationship with Tice deteriorated after Cutler berated his offensive line and bumped tackle J'Marcus Webb leaving the field after one of seven sacks suffered in a loss at Green Bay.
 
By the end of the season backup quarterback McCown was acting as an occasional messenger between Tice and Cutler, whose lack of respect for Tice had become palpable through a 10-6 season that ultimately got Smith and most of his staff fired.
 
Cutler's relationship with Trestman and coordinator Aaron Kromer started well through 2013. But the coaching staff became increasingly inclined to stay with McCown, who ran the offense interception-free and more to their liking during fill-in work while Cutler was out twice with injuries.
 
But sources said that Emery was insistent upon returning to and staying with Cutler over McCown, underscored by Cutler after the 2013 season being signed to a seven-year contract topping out at $126.7 million, with $54 million ultimately guaranteed over the first three years, subject to the Bears decisions in early 2015 and 2016 to commit to those guarantees.
 
As the 2014 season collapsed, Kromer anonymously voiced frustrations of the coaching staff to a national reporter, who reported supposed "buyer's remorse" with the Cutler contract. Kromer subsequently admitted to the breach and apologized to Cutler and the offense in mid-December. Kromer was fired immediately after the season, as were Emery and most of the Trestman staff.
 
Cutler developed a connection with Gase and Loggains, both hired in 2015 under Fox. Gase left to take the Miami Dolphins head coach job in 2016 and Cutler, dealing with thumb and shoulder issues, regressed in his five starts last season, finishing with 4 TD passes vs. 5 INT's and a rating of 78.1, second-lowest in his career behind only the 76.8 of 2009, his interception-filled first season with the Bears.

The "weapons" myth
 
Cutler defenders consistently cited the Bears' failure to surround him with supporting playmakers and protectors as a primary reason why Cutler never reached the heights promised by his physical talents. It is a story line that does not stand up to even cursory analysis.
 
Cutler and the Bears reached 11-5 and the NFC Championship game in 2010 with a wideout corps featuring Devin Hester and Johnny Knox, in addition to Matt Forte at running back and Greg Olsen at tight end, behind Frank Omiyale and Webb at the tackles.
 
Cutler posted a passer rating of 86.3 and was intercepted on 3.7 percent of his passes, neither number the stuff of elite.
 
By 2013, Emery had supplemented Forte with Martellus Bennett at tight end via free agency, and with Brandon Marshall via trade, to go with Jeffery. Cutler posted a rating of 89.2 and interception percentage of 3.4 – scant improvements over his play in 2010 with Hester, Knox, etc.
 
With the same weapons, McCown significantly out-performed Cutler in 2013, as did Hoyer in 2016.

Prickly teammates
 
Cutler was elected routinely as one of the co-captains on offense, a situation that would have been more notable had he not been, given the position played. But while Cutler consistently had the public backing of the locker room, conditions around the central figure of the offense were too often less than sanguine.
 
Leaving the field after one 2009 change of possession, Cutler got harsh with one of his offensive linemen. Pro Bowl center Olin Kreutz told Cutler not to go there, to which Cutler told Kreutz, "you play your position, I'll play mine," according to sources.
 
Cutler physically bumped and berated Webb while leaving the field during the 2012 game at Green Bay, yelling at Webb, "Get your [expletive] head in the game."
 
Linebacker Pernell McPhee, at the time inactive on the PUP list, said something loosely to that effect this season after Cutler had turned the football over a second time in the third quarter of the week-two loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.
 
Cutler was not a favorite of one-time defensive fixtures Lance Briggs and Brian Urlacher. And relationships with Bennett, Marshall and others were inconsistent, with the former teammates taking shots at Cutler from safe distances after they'd left the Bears via trades.

Postcards from Camp: Defense predictably ahead of offense but “D” already being challenged by changing “O"

Postcards from Camp: Defense predictably ahead of offense but “D” already being challenged by changing “O"

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – An open postcard from the Bears “D”:
 
Yes, we know we need more interceptions. And we’re doing something about it, even if Mitch doesn’t like it – quarterbacks never do. Tru’ probably wasn’t in a great mood after Nick Kwiatkoski picked his way through traffic, then deflected and grabbed a pass of Mitch’s for one pick, this after Kyle (Fuller) had snagged one of 10’s in 7-on-7. So after Cre’Von LeBlanc broke in front of Adam Shaheen to intercept one of Chase Daniel’s throws, Mitch and Prince (Amukamara) did a little jawing. But hey….
 
Kwit is having a great camp, running the offense with Danny Trevathan nursing a hamstring problem and Roquan Smith still not signed. Coach Nagy has told us, and said it again on Sunday, that you have to win your job, no gimmes here, and Kwit isn’t giving anything away.
 
We all were kind of causing problems for the offense. Prince broke up a Mitch throw to Kevin White and then defensed another two snaps later against Josh Bellamy. Kyle broke up a long try to White, too, and even in 7-on7, the QB’s were having to hold onto the ball longer because of good coverage.
 
(Kevin had a spotty day. He burned us with a long TD catch against double coverage but also dropped another Mitch Trubisky deep heave with no one closer than five yards away, and had the football come out when he hit the ground after another catch.)
 
We even created a “problem” for coach Nagy, who’s an offensive guy, an ex-QB himself and a former O-coordinator, but now has to pretend be at least a little happy when we do something on defense. Like he said Sunday, ‘The biggest difference [as a head coach] is you can't veer too much, either way. You're right down the middle. So, if Mitch throws an interception, it's good for our defense. Right? It's not good for Mitch. So, how do you balance that?”
 
Really, we should be ahead of the offense. Two reasons: First, the offense is still learning its playbook and a lot of new guys; and second, as Eddie [Jackson] was saying, “I just know that we’ve got better chemistry from having players here last year. It’s like the biggest thing that you can see. But the offense is doing a great job. They come out there and give us good looks.”
 
The pads were on for Sunday’s practice, so there was more hitting. The offense’ll be catching up more and more, so we’ll just enjoy the edge while it lasts.
 
Sincerely,
 
The “D”
 
P.S.  High-fives to all you fans who came down to watch practice and stayed through all that rain. We’re getting paid to be out there but you’re there because you’re Bears fans. Thanks

 
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Let’s make if official
 
Play during practice Sunday was sloppy at times, understandable given the repeated downpours as well as the inevitable early-camp learning curves.
 
But the practice was run using NFL officials, making their annual camp visits to review and explain new rules, and the Bears committed too many penalties to leave coaches satisfied.
 
Rookie wide receiver Anthony Miller was flagged for offensive pass interference on an early 7-on-7 rep and a handful of other Bears brought out the yellow laundry from the officials. One defensive offsides, a couple of false starts and other interference penalties—all part of those things to be “cleaned up” before the flags start to count.
 
*                          *                          *
 
A-Rob impact—and workload—growing
 
The No. 1 question of anyone who’s been watching training camp is “How’s Trubisky look?” Not far behind that, though, is “What about Robinson? His knee ok?”
 
If early camp performances, including Sunday’s in full pads, are any indicator, and a handful of practices aren’t ever definitive, then the answers on the hoped-for franchise wideout are clear positives. The top free-agent signing of the Bears this offseason has turned in repeated strong plays and has been targeted enough in the course of Trubisky’s progressions to be satisfied at his ability to get open and to earn his quarterback’s confidence.
 
Robinson turned in a difficult sliding catch on Sunday and was denied a deep catch later only by an outstanding pass breakup by safety Adrian Amos. Robinson is coming off season-ending knee surgery of a year ago and likely has a handful of rest days built into his plan, as the Bears are doing with guard Kyle Long. 
 
“We want to be able to monitor and make sure we don’t overdo anything,”said coach Matt Nagy. “There’s no need to do that. He’s worked really hard to get to this point so for us, just to keep an idea where he’s at, how many reps he’s getting, and coach [Mike] Furrey’s done a good job of that.”
 
 
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Fan favorite…sort of
 
This writer was departing O’Hare some weeks back and at an adjacent gate was Bears running back Tarik Cohen. Just time to exchange a few pleasantries and I was leaving. But the notable part of the moment was that no one – no…one —recognized Cohen. No. one.
 
Then came Saturday morning and the first day of fans attending a training-camp practice. The biggest ovation went to quarterback Mitch Trubisky. Not far short of that, however, was the welcome for Cohen, a hint that the second-year ultra-back (with apologies to Raymont Harris, the original Ultraback) won’t go unnoticed at too many more O’Hare gates.
 
“A couple people knew me in the airport,” Cohen said. “I was just keeping my head down, keeping it moving. Airports are congested places.”
 
An ovation coming out to practice “feels great,” Cohen said. “It’s like seeing your hard work pay off a little bit. But I’m looking for a bigger ovation coming out for the games.”
 
*                          *                          *
 
Sick bay
 
Rookie linebacker linebacker Joel Iyiegbuniwe was added to a defense-heavy list of injured absentees, out with what coach Matt Nagy reported was a shoulder injury. He joins linebackers Aaron Lynch and Danny Trevathan and cornerback Sherrick McManis, all with hamstring strains.
 
Tight end Daniel Brown is still out with an ankle injury.
 

Training Camp Daily: Defense still “picking” on Bears QB’s in rainy practices

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USA TODAY

Training Camp Daily: Defense still “picking” on Bears QB’s in rainy practices

Training Camp Daily: The Bears put the pads on for Sunday's practice on another wet day in Bourbonnais. Bears insider John 'Moon' Mullin & producer Paul Aspan discuss Mitchell Trubisky's accuracy, which continues to be a work in progress. Plus Anthony Miller & Kevin White turn heads, while Aaron Lynch suffers yet another injury setback when the Bears are already thin at pass rusher. 

Listen to the full episode here or via the embedded player below: