Bears

Former Bear Brandon Marshall agrees to deal with Giants

Former Bear Brandon Marshall agrees to deal with Giants

Former Bear Brandon Marshall is on the move again, but he'll get to stay in the same stadium.

The wide receiver agreed to terms with the New York Giants on a two-year deal worth $12 million. While the deal has been reported by multiple outlets, Marshall can't sign until 3 p.m. Thursday when free agency officially opens.

The Jets released Marshall earlier this offseason. Marshall, who will be 33 when the 2017 season starts, spent two years with the Jets totaling 17 touchdowns and 2,290 yards on 168 receptions.

Marshall was with the Bears from 2012-2014 and had 31 touchdowns in those three years.

Matt Nagy the offensive mind needs to match Matt Nagy the leader

8-16mattnagy.jpg
USA Today

Matt Nagy the offensive mind needs to match Matt Nagy the leader

The Bears’ decision to put Kyle Long on injured reserve was not arrived upon lightly. 

This was a former three-time Pro Bowl offensive lineman who played for quite a few bad teams, only to have his body fail him once the Bears became playoff contenders. He’s now been on injured reserve in four consecutive seasons, and this time, it might end his career in Chicago. 

The conversation from management to player could not have been easy. But having Matt Nagy around to deliver it probably made things a little less difficult. 

“I feel like personally, that’s one of my strengths is dealing with these players and where they’re at and how they feel,” Nagy said. “There’s a connection there that you need to have. The part of it that makes it easier is when you run into these situations, you want to be able to have strong relationships with your players so when there are tough decision that have to be made, it’s natural and it doesn’t feel scripted — it doesn’t feel like this is the first time I’m talking to you in months.”

Nagy’s genuine ability to be the leader and tone-setter inside Halas Hall helps when such a tough decision has to be made. The same may go for the IR-or-no-IR decision awaiting the Bears with defensive lineman Akiem Hicks, who suffered a significant elbow injury in London against the Oakland Raiders. 

But those leadership qualities extend well beyond dealing with injured players or setting next-man-up expectations. When the Bears re-convened in Lake Forest for practice on Monday, they did so with positive vibes — which aren’t necessarily a given for a team that’s encountered more issues than expected through the first five games of 2019. 

And those begin with Nagy. 

“We know this isn’t just some regular head coach that’s here just because he’s the head coach of an NFL football team,” outside linebacker Aaron Lynch said. “Like, he’s here, he’s got a purpose and he’s giving that message to us that we can buy into.

“… Because he’s genuine, we know everything he says comes from his heart. It’s so much easier to buy into something like that when you know what he’s saying, he means and he’s not just saying it because there’s cameras around.”

Nagy’s leadership abilities are unquestioned. But what about his ability to scheme and call an offense?

Those haven’t matched the success he’s had as a leader. Consider there to be two different versions of Nagy, the head coach: Nagy the leader, and Nagy the offensive mind. 

Nagy’s scheme hasn’t yielded the sort of fruits expected from a branch of Andy Reid’s Kansas City offense, with the sixth-lowest points per game average (17.7) in the NFL. His playcalling — be it a tepid commitment to the run, or being too predictable in certain situations — has come under scrutiny, and a larger observation has been he’s had fewer answers in Year 2, when the rest of the league has a full season of tape on his offense. 

Nagy needs the players within his offense to play better, but he also needs to coach better, as he admitted after the Bears’ Week 5 loss at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium. So part of the time he spent during the Bears’ off week was on self-scouting himself, from play design to playcalling tendencies. 

“There’s some things that just aren’t going to change, but then there’s some that are pretty glaring,” Nagy said. “And I think those are the ones where you say, okay, how do I maybe break that just a little bit, so that the defenses can’t always just say every time they’re doing this or that, to help us.”

What’s clear is that the Bears will be competitive in every game they play because of Nagy’s leadership. But for this team to deliver on its sky-high preseason expectations, it needs Nagy the offensive mind to match Nagy the leader. 

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Bears.

Mitch Trubisky begins throwing again as Bears continue to monitor his status for Sunday's game

trubisky915e.jpg
USA Today

Mitch Trubisky begins throwing again as Bears continue to monitor his status for Sunday's game

The Bears returned to practice on Monday, the first time the team was at Halas Hall since they left for London almost two weeks ago. Among those who did practice was starting quarterback Mitch Trubisky, who has been out for most of the last two games with an injured non-throwing shoulder. Head coach Matt Nagy wouldn’t definitively say whether Trubisky would start on Sunday against the Saints, but was encouraged by what he saw from the quarterback in practice. 

“His situation for us is seeing exactly where he’s at with pain,” Nagy said on Monday. “Just all of us collaborating exactly to see where he is, so that we can make a decision as to which way we want to go for this week –– whether he’s ready or if he’s not ready.” 

It was reported that Trubisky suffered a dislocated left shoulder, along with a slight labrum tear, when Minnesota defensive lineman Danielle Hunter tripped up the QB on the Bears’ first offensive drive of their Week 3 win over the Vikings. 

Monday was the first time he had thrown footballs since suffering the injury, a progression that –– along with the Bears moving 3rd string QB Tyler Bray back to the practice squad –– indicates Trubisky may not be far from returning. He wasn’t put on a pitch-count during Monday's practice, and the next step is assessing his pain tolerance. Nagy was adamant, however, in his assurance that if Trubisky is back on the field against New Orleans, it’ll be because the team is fully confident in his ability to absorb hits. 

“If he ends up playing, then he plays,” he said. “... You can’t tell someone to play a game and not get hit. You can’t do it. If you’re okay to play a game, than you’re okay to get hit. It’s not hard – it’s pretty simple.” 

Coming out of the bye, the Bears now head into a doozy of a schedule that includes games against (among others) Philadelphia, New Orleans, Dallas, and Kansas City. The Bears had one of, if not the, least productive offenses in football with Trubisky at the helm through the first three weeks, and Nagy talked on Monday about how the team is quickly approaching the point in the season where title contenders move away from the pack. There’s a good bit of pressure on the offense to figure out a quick fix, but it’s not changing what type of progression they’re expecting to see out of their third-year QB. 

“If he’s able to play, then I want to just be able to see the stuff I’ve always been looking for,” Nagy said. “Which is just in-and-out of the huddle, making throws at the right time, and then making proper decisions –– whether it’s in the run game or the pass game.”

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of the Bears.