Bears

Harris: 'We'll see those guys again... in Super Bowl'

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Harris: 'We'll see those guys again... in Super Bowl'

Sunday, Dec. 12, 2010
9:27 PM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Defensive tackle Tommie Harris just slowly nodded his head at the question: Are the New England Patriots really that good?

Oh yeah, said Harris, who was returned to the starting job hed lost after the second game this season. Theyre that good.

But if the Bears were indeed bent by the New England onslaught on offense and defense in Sundays 36-7 embarrassment, they were far from broken. Harris followed his frank assessment of the Patriots excellence with a de facto prediction:

The Bears and Patriots will face off in Super Bowl XLV.

I feel like well see those guys again down the road, Harris said. Yeah. I feel like we will see them in the Super Bowl.

The Patriots clinched a playoff berth with their win. The Bears could clinch the NFC North division next Sunday with a victory over Minnesota, wherever that game ends up being played, and a Green Bay loss at New England.

But what the Bears take away from Sundays humiliation at the hands of a ranking member of the NFL elite will perhaps be the most important lesson they learn or fail to learn.

The Patriots in the 2001 regular season lost to the St. Louis Rams, then coached by current Bears offensive coordinator Mike Martz. The Patriots, left at 5-5 at the time by the loss, did not lose again and in fact did see the Rams again that season, beating them in the Super Bowl.

New England on this day, however, showed the Bears a very harsh reality that the Bears may have lost sight of during their stretch of five straight wins before Sunday.

Sometimes you need a good whipping and thats what we got, said linebacker Lance Briggs. A good whipping helps us get ourselves back to where we need to be. A loss like this can be good if it comes at the right time.

The 2010 Bears would not be the first team to be bashed late in the season and move from that loss to a championship. The 1985 Bears were embarrassed in Miami and then not again that season. The 2010 Bears are at their own fork in the road and know it.

If you want to be world champs, theres a difference in the level of play, said center Olin Kreutz. Every once in a while when youre climbing to the top in something, somebody at the top shows you what it takes to be there. If you learn from them and next time you see them you close the gap on them, then this could be a great thing for us.

They showed us today how far we have to go to be world champs. If we accept that challenge, who knows where we could be. We have high-character guys in here. But its easy to be pretty good and its hard to be great and guys have to decide if they want to be great.

Critics, skeptics and doubters may not see the Bears playing more than their scheduled 16 games in 2010 but at least one of the Patriots does.

They are a playoff-caliber team, said nose tackle Vince Wolfork.

Duly noted

Because of the Packers loss to Detroit, Green Bay will have at least two division losses for 2010. If the Bears defeat Minnesota next weekend they will stand at 5-0 in the division and win a tiebreaker with the Packers based on division records, the second tiebreaker after head-to-head, in which the Packers can do no better than a split with the Bears.

Maybe this was all a Bill Belichick-Mike Martz thing. The 40-22 win in 2004 by Belichicks Patriots at the expense of Martzs St. Louis Rams was the worst home loss suffered by the Rams in five seasons.

The last time the Bears faced Soldier Field in-game precipitation like Sundays was on Halloween 1994 and they did not fare much better in the sheets of rain that night either. The Packers buried the Bears 33-6 on the night that the franchise retired the uniform numbers of Dick Butkus and Gale Sayers.

Over-viewing

General Manager Jerry Angelo has never seen a final four games on a schedule to rival the Bears closing stretch of New England, Minnesota, the New York Jets and Green Bay. But as difficult as it may be, Angelo likes the thinking behind the situation. The commissioner had a great idea, putting our division games at the end, Angelo said on WBBM-AMs pregame show. Should be great football.

As positive as much of the offensive line performance has been through the Bears five-game winning streak, the line is still a work in progress and its probably going to be that way to the end, Angelo said.

Sitting out

Rookie defensive end Corey Wootton was a surprise active for Sunday, his third game this season, taking the place of defensive tackle Marcus Harrison in a move to add height in the pass rush against a quick-release quarterback like Tom Brady. The Bears made repeated use of three tight ends in a power-run plan early, using Kellen Davis, Brandon Manumaleuna and Greg Olsen together. Tight end Desmond Clark, however, remained on the inactive list for the ninth game in the last 10..

Nick Roach opened at strong-side linebacker in place of injured Pisa Tinoisamoa for the third time in the last four games. But Roach and Rod Wilson were rotated on alternating series.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears players stand by Mitch Trubisky ahead of Colin Kaepernick workout

Bears players stand by Mitch Trubisky ahead of Colin Kaepernick workout

Bears fans view the quarterback position as a point of need for improvement. Mitchell Trubisky's subpar play has drawn a fair amount of criticism and prompted rumors connecting the Bears to just about any available quarterback, from Cam Newton to even Patriots legend Tom Brady.

When the NFL announced an open workout for Colin Kaepernick this weekend, the Bears were immediately connected as a potential suitor of his services. They're not one of the 11 confirmed teams attending, but that doesn't mean they won't.

Bears safety Eddie Jackson said during an interview on 670 The Score the team is happy for Kaepernick but ultimately were uninterested.

"Mitch Trubisky is our quarterback. We are sticking with him," Jackson added.

Jackson has to verbally support Trubisky and can't openly call for the Bears to explore other options at quarterback.

That doesn't mean the team won't explore their options and for a team with sense of urgency to compete in a window with a stout defensive unit intact, why not send an envoy to see how Kaepernick performs?

And if Trubisky is the guy to lead the Bears to a deep playoff run (at some point), would Kaepernick not be a valuable backup? More so than Chase Daniel despite his familiarity with Nagy's offense?

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Age before beauty when it comes to Bears, elite NFL defensive coaching

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USA Today

Age before beauty when it comes to Bears, elite NFL defensive coaching

It doesn’t necessarily qualify as age discrimination, maybe just more of a sorta “age-typing” around the NFL. Because the image of what makes a top offensive mind in the NFL is radically different from what’s become almost a standard for defensive-coaching pedigree.

Looking for a hot offensive coach? The cliche’d expectation has become that it’ll be someone young.

Putting together a ring of honor for the elite defensive minds in the NFL? Think “veteran"... VERY veteran.

Consider:

Minnesota coach Mike Zimmer this week remarked during preparations for his Vikings hosting the Denver Broncos that he was pleased that Denver coach and former Bears defensive coordinator Vic Fangio finally got a head-coaching berth at a time when so many top jobs have been going to the presumed hot, young offensive minds that vaulted to the top after “one-year sabbaticals.”

The one-year thing refers to the fast-tracking that has happened with increased frequency in recent years — the ascensions to head coach of Adam Gase (41) with the Jets, Arizona’s Kliff Kingsbury (40), Matt LaFleur (40) in Green Bay, the Bears’ Matt Nagy (41), or Zac Taylor (36) in Cincinnati — after a year or two, sometimes less, as offensive coordinators. Sean McVay was 31 when the Rams hired him. Kyle Shanahan took over in San Francisco at 38.

Andy Reid at 61 looks perhaps like an outlier out there in Kansas City. But Reid was 41 when he became Donovan McNabb’s head coach in Philadelphia back in 1999.

Meanwhile, for whatever reason, the image bar on defense, between head coaches or defensive coordinators, lies in the other direction — the savvy, cagy, crusty old lion: Bill Belichick (67) in New England with the NFL’s No. 1 defense; Dallas ranked No. 6 on defense with coordinator Rod Marinelli (70); the Bears fourth in scoring defense under Chuck Pagano (59), who succeeded Fangio. Denver No. 7 with Fangio as head coach and Ed Donatell (62) as his defensive coordinator.

Preparing for the Los Angeles Rams’ 11th-ranked defense on Sunday, Nagy this week brought up Rams defensive coordinator Wade Phillips (72) for recognition: “How do you not appreciate what he’s done over his career? He’s done some amazing things. He’s been in the league forever. When he was in Denver and I was in Kansas City we’ve seen him. When he was in Houston and I was in Kansas City we’ve seen him.”

Defensive legend Dick LeBeau finished his NFL coaching career with Tennessee at age 80.

So how is it that youth has come to be served on offense, while on defense, the prevailing philosophy has been age before beauty?

"I don't know,” Nagy reflected. “Maybe it's just a phase that we're in right now?

“It's probably a little bit of a trend involved there. the other part of it, too, is that you get some of these older coaches that are in it, they've seen it all, right? You go back to Tom Brady when he talked about that he's seen every defense; these [defensive seniors] have seen every offense and so they have ways to adjust and experiences.”

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