Bears

Hillenmeyer: NFL lockout different than NHL's

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Hillenmeyer: NFL lockout different than NHL's

Monday, March 28, 2011
Posted: 2:30 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

The Bears released Hunter Hillenmeyer early this offseason but that doesnt mean that the veteran linebacker and players rep is without perspectives on the current situation involving his sport.

Hillenmeyer, writing on NBCChicago.com's Grizzly Detail blog, draws parallels (and differences) between the lockout of the NFL and the one imposed by the National Hockey League, beginning with the fact that both involved outside counsel union breaker Bob Batterman.

Hmmm.

Both lockouts followed moves to de-certify the player unions, and the NHL players was upheld. Hunter brings in his personal perspectives, formed while he was actively involved in the final days of talks and was witness to the proposals put forward by the players group.

A noteworthy difference between the NFL and NHL situations lies in the fact that hockey owners were hemorrhaging cash during negotiations, something clearly not the case in footballs situation. And Hillenmeyer reiterates that NFL players are willing to accept less than the percentage of revenues than hockey players wanted, and that NFL players will be content with staying with the same deal, under which all sides were making money.

Not to take a side, but its tough to argue with that fact. Not many labor groups have been willing to accept status quo in negotiations, and it may be difficult to see a judge in this case ignoring that fact when the Apr. 6 case comes up for adjudication.

Medically speaking

One of the ticking issues in the owner-player situation is former players and their health benefits. A representative of the NFL players is reporting that a Federal judge has issued an injunction requiring all teams and owners to stop seeking to reduce the worker comp benefits due former players for injuries suffered while playing the game.

And as for current players, colleague Tom Curran at CSNNE.com has established with the NFL that players may in fact see team doctors during the lockout, as long as it is not at team facilities. That follows Tom seeing a story in the Boston Globe in which a team physician alluded to one of the Patriots showing up at his office.

Even the players themselves were off on this one, as the website of the former union laid out as one of the lockout terms that players couldnt see medical staff. For the likes of Jay Cutler and his knee, this is good news, for both player and team.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Akiem Hicks reveals what makes him so good against the run

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USA TODAY

Akiem Hicks reveals what makes him so good against the run

Akiem Hicks finally earned the recognition he deserved in 2018 with his first trip to the Pro Bowl, and playing on the NFL’s No. 1 defense provided the national attention he should have received in his first two years with the Bears.

He’s a solid interior pass rusher, but where he dominates is in run defense, leading the NFL in run stops last season according to Pro Football Focus.

When Hicks beats an offensive lineman at the line of scrimmage to make a big tackle in the backfield, it’s a work of art, and he revealed the secret to those flashy plays on NFL Game Pass.

He broke down the film of a play against the Green Bay Packers where he beats center Corey Linsley because he knew right guard Jordan McCray was going to pull to the left.

“I read it before the snap happens. I know that McCray is going to pull just based off his stance,” Hicks said. “I know his stance for every play that he’s going to do. I’m going to be at least 75 percent right.”

Hicks looks at how much weight an offensive lineman is putting on his hand, how far apart his legs are and how much bend is in his hips.

“If you do your due-diligence as a defensive lineman and prepare like a professional during the week, you’re going to know,” Hicks said.

Any little deviation from a normal stance is an indicator to Hicks of what the play is going to be, and that pre-snap knowledge keeps him a step ahead of the blocker in front of him.

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Vegas sets Mitchell Trubisky’s pass TD total at 26.5

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USA TODAY

Vegas sets Mitchell Trubisky’s pass TD total at 26.5

If Mitchell Trubisky has the kind of break out year in his second season under Matt Nagy that Bears fans are hoping for, he should have no problem cashing an OVER 26.5 passing TDs ticket for bettors who want to back him.

Per Bet Chicago, Caesars is rolling out division props and they set Trubisky’s touchdown pass total for 2019 at 26.5 and his pass yard total at 3,744.5.

While both those marks would be career highs for Trubisky, this number will surely be seen as a slight by the hometown fans and continue to add to the polarizing nature of the quarterback formerly known as the Pretty Boy Assassin.

In Chicago, and if you’re team Mitch, this number is ridiculously low and you’re probably already pounding the over.

Outside of Chicago, and with some analytical support, there’s a lot of doubt about Trubisky’s future as a viable option as an NFL starter, so I’d guess the Pro Football Focus crowd is probably gonna take the under.

We rolled out some props of our own on the Under Center podcast last week including:

Will Mitch Trubisky pass for 10 or more touchdowns than Craig Kimbrel has saves? (Including playoffs for both)

26.5 regular season passing touchdowns probably gives Kimbrel the edge, but it’s right in range. 

And that Trubisky – Kimbrel prop prompted this bold response from our own Bears insider JJ Stankevitz:

I don’t think I’m in the 40 club with my guy JJ, but the OVER certainly feels like the move here. At least it better be if the Bears are gonna make any sort of NFC North title defense.