Bears

Jay Cutler experience should push Bears far away from just measurables when choosing next QB

Jay Cutler experience should push Bears far away from just measurables when choosing next QB

Teams routinely evaluate draft candidates starting with measurable traits. Then, once the 40-times, height/weight results and such are tabulated, intangibles like leadership and “football character” enter in as tipping points.

For what the Bears need and want to do this offseason at their  most important position, the Bears need to reverse the process. Do it backwards.

The Bears’ first turn on the draft clock does not come around for upwards of two months, maybe effectively before that if trading draft choices for a Jimmy Garoppolo happens in the meantime. But with the start of the league year and its trading window approach, the talk around Jay Cutler is popping up more and more, whether he’ll command anything in a trade or whether to just cut ties and move on.

But the Cutler experience should be and quite possibly is figuring into what the Bears will do if a quarterback is what they target and select, presumably in the first round. And based on Cutler as a case study, subtle and not-so-subtle indications are that GM Ryan Pace is looking beyond the usual “measurables” in evaluating quarterback prospects, as he absolutely should be.

In this one position, it becomes imperative that the Bears go off-script, outside the box, and look first, hardest and longest at something that won’t show up on any stopwatch or tape measure.

“You want to look for a player who has lifted his program for the most part,” Pace said during his time at this year’s Senior Bowl last month. “That's something that's there. Quarterbacks we've been around, I think Drew Brees, for example, when he was at Purdue, he lifted that program. That's one of the things we look for. That's definitely a factor added into about 30 other things you factor into that position.”

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Why this resonance so loudly over the Bears is because for the last eight years they had a designer quarterback who unquestionably checked every measurable box: size (6-3, 225 pounds, mobility, footspeed, arm strength), yet failed to lift his team the way Pace was accustomed to from his time in New Orleans around Brees.

North Carolina’s Mitch Trubisky is Cutler: 6-3, 209 pounds, big arm. Notre Dame’s DeShone Kizer is Cutler: 6-4, 230 pounds, big arm, mobility.

Tellingly perhaps, Pace also cited another intangible in a way that suggests it will influence his and the Bears’ draft board: “It's your football intelligence, it's your accuracy, it's your ability to quickly process.”

But Trubisky was a starter just one year (2016). Kizer “led” the Irish to a 4-8 season and a 14-11 overall mark in his starts over two years.

Deshaun Watson, in the National Championship game the past two years, is similar in physical stature (6-3, 209) to Kizer and Trubisky, Garoppolo, too, for that matter. But “lifted his program” should be a monumental tipping point here.

And experience. Garoppolo had one spectacular year, his senior season, at Eastern Illinois. His first three years were nothing special, marked by heavy interception totals and barely 60 percent completions. Pace’s weighted criteria have experience high up.

“Yeah, [experience] carries a lot of weight,” Pace said. “I think there’s nothing that can really substitute [for] that. It’s already a big jump from college to the NFL as it is, so the more of that you have, the more beneficial it is.”

Measurables were why Russell Wilson (size) didn’t go until the third round, and why Tom Brady (foot speed) lasted until the sixth. For the Bears, the hard-to-gauge intangibles should be their first evaluation points, far ahead of the physical skills and talents that they have had here since 2009.

Soldier Field to host drive-in movie screenings through July

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NBC Sports Chicago

Soldier Field to host drive-in movie screenings through July

You're probably not going to be able to watch the Bears at Soldier Field any time soon, but next week you'll be able to watch a movie there! That's kind of the same! 

That's because a program called 'Chi-Togther' "will provide Music Entertainment and Movie Screenings each night that will also include carpool-style concerts plus food and beverage options for all ages."

The event will be held in Soldier's South lot, and anyone who signs up will get a free popcorn! Honestly, it's worth it  just to get out of the house and grab yourself some free kernels. 

Movies being screened include Groundhog Day, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and Fast and Furious (hell yeah). Also Shrek. 

12 greatest Chicago Bears wins in Soldier Field history

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USA TODAY

12 greatest Chicago Bears wins in Soldier Field history

The Chicago Bears franchise celebrated 100 years of football last season but there are a few more notable anniversaries on the horizon.

Next year will mark the 50th anniversary of Bears football at Soldier Field. And the columned stadium itself, which opened in 1924, is nearing the century mark.

While the franchise played a vast majority of their home games at Wrigley Field in its early years, a smattering of contests took place at the lakefront facility. The first of which was a 10-0 win over the Chicago Cardinals on Nov. 11, 1926. 

The Bears moved away from Wrigley Field after the 1970 campaign, landing at the AstroTurfed Soldier Field the following season. The team’s first game there — as official tenants — gave the franchise a positive jolt. A late Kent Nix touchdown pass gave the Bears a 17-15 victory over coach Chuck Noll’s Pittsburgh Steelers in front of a capacity crowd. The win was one of the bright spots in an otherwise pedestrian 6-8 season.

Alas, there were better days ahead.

Let’s take a look back at the 12 greatest Bears wins at Soldier Field:

12 greatest Bears wins in Soldier Field history