Bears

Jets' Sanchez hurting, lacking respect from Bears

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Jets' Sanchez hurting, lacking respect from Bears

Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010
5:47 PM

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez is struggling with a shoulder injury. Hes also struggling to get some real respect from the team hes about to face, shoulder permitting.

Linebacker Brian Urlacher had to search for thoughts on Sanchez, settling on, Um. Theyre a running football team. How about that? They try to be physical and pound the ball, and get in some good third and short situations, if they can.

The first Sanchez asset that came to the mind of linebacker Lance Briggs: Hes a resilient guy.

And defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli, who last week lavished such praise on rookie Joe Webb that it was difficult not to suspect that someone had slipped a tape of Michael Vick into Marinellis projector, given Marinellis use of Vickian superlatives to describe Webb.

And Sanchez? I sense a really competitive spirit, Marinelli said. Hes got a real competitiveness about him.

Sanchez isnt even getting unqualified backing from his coach. Still struggling with a shoulder injury suffered in last weekends game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Sanchez was limited in practice for the second straight day. He said Wednesday that if the game were being played right then, he would have played.

Not so, according to his coach. Rex Ryan has dubbed Sanchezs status as a game-time decision. And if Sanchez cant go, the Bears will be looking at veteran Mark Brunell in his fourth different costume, after playing the Bears as a Packer, Jaguar and Redskin in seasons past.

Sanchez hasnt thrown a touchdown pass in his three December games, 106 throws without one of them winding up in the end zone.

Sanchez has had flashes of brilliance. He also has been the quarterback in the four Jets losses when they scored 9 (vs. Baltimore), 0 (vs. Green Bay), 3 (vs. New England) and 6 (vs. Miami) points.

In all three, four of those games we had opportunities in the red zone that we just didnt capitalize on, Sanchez explained. In all of them we had turnovers except for the Baltimore game. There just wasnt a good flow to our offense, a rhythm. Its clear when you watch film from those games, and then all the other games it looks like a totally different team.

A little traveling music, please

Theyve been in Bourbonnais since 2002 and the Bears will be there for training camp at Olivet Nazarene University through at least 2012, with an option for 2013. The venue lacks the hills and trees of Platteville but its also a place you can get to in a little over an hour and its in Illinois, so your travel dollars stay in-state.

Playing footsienot

Lance Briggs was not going to be drawn into any of the brouhaha swirling about the supposed video of Jets coach Rex Ryans wife and her feet.

No. Nuh uh, Briggs said, laughing. No. I stay away from feet, you know what I mean? Im in bad need of a pedicure right now, so I dont wish anyone near my feet.

Sick bay

Wide receiver Earl Bennett sat out his second day of practice with an ankle injury, increasing chances that tight end Desmond Clark will be active for the Jets game. Two of Clarks four active game days this season were when receivers (Bennett, Devin Aromashodu) were placed on the inactive list.

Linebacker Pisa Tinoisamoa (knee) was limited in practice for the second day.

Safety Eric Smith (concussion) and tackle Damien Woody (knee) were held out of practice again.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Can Trubisky help the Bears beat the Saints?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Can Trubisky help the Bears beat the Saints?

Hub Arkush, Sam Panayotovich and Ben Pope join Kelly Crull on the panel.

0:00- Mitch Trubisky practices again and he got all of the first-team reps. So will his return help the Bears upset the Saints on Sunday?

8:30- KC Johnson joins Kelly to discuss Luol Deng retiring a Bull, Wendell Carter, Jr.'s thumb injury and to preview the Bulls' preseason finale.

14:00- Ben has the latest on the Blackhawks including Jeremy Colliton's goaltender plans for the week. He also tells us if we should be worried about Jonathan Toews' slow start to the season.

21:00- Will Perdue joins the panel to talk about the importance of a good start this season for the Bulls. Plus, he has his

Listen to the full podcast here or via the embedded player below:

Sports Talk Live Podcast

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Matt Nagy's commitment to the run is fine, the Bears just have to run the ball better

Matt Nagy's commitment to the run is fine, the Bears just have to run the ball better

Matt Nagy’s run-pass balance, actually, has been fine in 2019. 

The Bears have run on 40 percent of their plays before the off week, a tick below the NFL average of 41 percent. Nagy is trying to commit to the run, too, on first down: His team has run the ball on 53 percent of its first-and-10 plays this year, slightly above the NFL average of 52 percent. 

On third and short (defined here as fewer than three yards to gain), too, it’s not like Nagy has been willing to ditch the run. The Bears have run on 55 percent of those third and short plays this year, just below the league average of 56 percent. 

Roughly: The Bears’ run-pass balance is the NFL average. That’s okay for an offense not good enough to lean heavily in one direction, like the San Francisco 49ers (56 percent run rate, highest in the NFL) or Kansas City Chiefs (66 percent pass rate, fifth-highest). 

And this doesn’t account for a bunch of quarterback runs, either. Mitch Trubisky and Chase Daniel have averaged 2.2 rushes per game in 2019; last year, those two averaged 5.1 rushing attempts per game. 

So that doesn’t jive with the narrative of Nagy not being willing to commit to running the ball. He is. The will is there, but the results aren’t. 

So why haven’t the results been there? To get there, we need to take a deep dive into what's gone wrong. 

Most of this article will focus on first and 10 plays, which have a tendency to set a tone for an entire drive. 
And rather surprisingly, the Bears don’t seem to be bad at running the ball on first and 10. Per SharpFootballStats.com, The Bears are averaging 4.1 yards per run on first and 10 with a 46 percent success rate — just below the NFL average of 4.3 yards per run and a 48 percent success rate. David Montgomery, taking out three first-and-goal-to-go runs, is averaging 3.7 yards per run on first and 10. 

That’s not great, of course, but Nagy would be pleased if his No. 1 running back was able to grind out three or four yards per run on first down. 

“If I’m calling a run, it needs to be a run and it’s not second and 10, it’s second and seven or six, right? That’s what we need to do,” Nagy said. 

The issue, though, is the Bears are 30th in the NFL in explosive rushing plays, having just three. In a small sample size, Cordarrelle Patterson’s 46-yard dash in Week 2 against the Denver Broncos skews the Bears’ average yards per run on first and 10 higher than it’ll wind up at the end of the year if something isn’t fixed. 

Only Washington and the Miami Dolphins have a worse explosive run rate than the Bears on first-and-10. 

“First down needs to be a better play for us,” Nagy said. “Run or pass.”

Not enough opportunity

There are several damning stats about the Bears’ offense this year, which Nagy acknowledged on Thursday. 

“That’s our offense right now,” Nagy said. “That’s the simple facts. So any numbers that you look at right now within our offense, you could go to a lot of that stuff and say that. We recognize that and we need to get better at that.”

That answer was in reference to Tarik Cohen averaging just 4.5 yards per touch, but can apply to this stat, too: 

The Bears are averaging 22 first-and-10 plays per game, per Pro Football Reference, the fourth-lowest average in the NFL (only the Jets, Steelers and Washington are lower). The team’s lackluster offense, which ranks 28th in first downs per game (17.4) certainly contributes heavily to that low number. 

But too: The Bears have been assessed eight penalties on first-and-10 plays, as well as one on a first-and-goal from the Minnesota Vikings’ five-yard line (a Charles Leno Jr. false start) and another offset by defensive holding (illegal shift vs. Oakland). 

“There’s probably not a lot of teams that are doing real great on second and long or third and long,” Nagy said. “So the other part of that too is you’re getting into first and 20 and now its second and 12.”

Can passing game help?

The Bears’ are gaining 6.3 yards per play on first-and-10 passes, the fourth-worst average in the NFL behind the Dolphins, Bengals and, interestingly, Indianapolis Colts (the Colts’ dominant offensive line, though, is allowing for an average of 5 1/2 yards per carry in those situations). 

So if the Bears aren’t having much success throwing on first-and-10, it could lead opposing defenses to feel more comfortable to sell out and stop the run. Or opposing defenses know they can stop the run without any extra effort, making it more difficult for the Bears to pass on first down. 

This is sort of a chicken-or-egg kind of deal. If the Bears run the ball more effectively on first down, it should help their passing game and vice versa. But having opposing defenses back off a bit with an effective passing game certainly couldn’t hurt. 

Situational tendencies

The Bears are atrocious at running the ball on second-and-long, and while 19 plays isn’t a lot, it’s too many. The Bears averaged 2.7 yards per carry on second-and-8-to-10-yard downs before their off week on those 19 plays, which either need to be fixed or defenestrated from a second-story window at Halas Hall. 

But on second and medium (four to seven yards, since we’re going with Nagy’s definition of run success here), the Bears are actually averaging more yards per carry (4.7) than yards per pass (4.5). Yet they’re passing on two-thirds of those plays, so if you’re looking for somewhere for Nagy to run the ball more, it might be here. 

And when the Bears do get into makable second-and-short (1-3 yards) situations, Nagy is over-committed to the run. The Bears ran on 72 percent of those plays before the off week — nearly 10 percent higher than the league average — yet averaged 1.9 yards per carry on them, 31st in the NFL behind Washington. 

“It's so easy as a player and a coach to get caught up in the trees,” Nagy said. “Especially on offense with some of the struggles that we've had, you get caught up in that and consume yourself with it. There's a right way and a wrong way with it and I feel like the past several days, really all of last week, I've had a good balance of being able to reflect, kinda reload on where we are, and I feel good with the stuff that we've done as a staff, that we've discussed where we're at and then looking for solutions. That's the No. 1 thing here.”

So what’s the solution?

Perhaps sliding Rashaad Coward into the Bears’ starting offensive line will inject some athleticism and physicality at right guard that could start opening up some more holes for the Bears’ backs. Perhaps it means less of Cohen running inside zone.

Perhaps it involves more of J.P. Holtz acting as a quasi-fullback. Perhaps it means getting more out of Adam Shaheen as a blocker. Perhaps it means, generally, better-schemed runs. 

Whatever the combination is, the Bears need to find it. 

But the solution to the Bears’ problem is not to run the ball more. It’s to run it better.