Bears

Lovie comfortable with future in Chicago

238483.jpg

Lovie comfortable with future in Chicago

Monday, Jan. 3, 2011
3:04 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

It wasnt immediately clear Monday whether Lovie Smith was addressing the media, his supporters, general fans, his critics (some crossover there, obviously), or Bears management. Probably all of them.

Smith will not be among the coaching casualties this season, not after an 11-5 season and return to the playoffs after three seasons of only 16 games. Wade Phillips in Dallas, Minnesotas Brad Childress, Mike Singletary in San Francisco, Eric Mangini in Cleveland (after exactly two seasons), and quite likely Tom Cable in Oakland, Miamis Tony Sparano and John Fox in Carolina, Marvin Lewis in Cincinnati.

A year ago there was no doubt that Smith was returning for 2010 but make no mistake: 2011 was very much in question. Now 2011 is set, has been for quite some time, and best guess is that Smith will receive an extension, possibly of two years beyond 2011, if the Bears reach the Super Bowl.

That may not happen until labor issues are closer to resolution. But even that began breaking in Smiths favor Monday when NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell sent a letter to 5 million fans declaring, I know we can and will reach an agreement.

So it wasnt at all surprising that Smith was visibly comfortable not only with the podium at which he was standing, again, and with the prospects of being there for more than just an annual, year-to-year referendum on his coaching.

Its where Ive been standing for seven years so I dont know what else to say, Smith said. Ive been in this position a few years. I love being here and plan on being here for a long time.

And more than once he gave his No. 1 reason, indirectly addressing what President Ted Phillips set forth as the franchises demand of Smith for 2010, that the team be moving significantly in the right direction.

In Smiths mind, it absolutely has been and is:

the guys have showed up each week, he said, which speaks to coaching preparedness, and were a good defensive team like were a good football team.

Talking about whether there are teams he would like or not like to play in the postseason (there are), the good football team theme was there again.

Were a good football team, Smith said. This time of the year, the teams that are in the playoffs are good football teams. The match-up is pretty good, pretty balanced no matter who you play.

Hurtful time

Mondays after final regular-season games arent especially upbeat in general when you look around the NFL and see the coaching careers that are hearing the snap of the gallows. No matter how inevitable it is or how obvious the changes might be, its never a truly happy day when someone loses a job. (Those of us whove gone through it can relate.)

So can Lovie Smith, who a year ago took his place over the trap door when his team missed the playoffs for the third straight year and a fourth was very likely going to be his last in Chicago. He and his team responded with their 11-5 performance.

Youre not happy about that, Smith said. In any profession, youre not happy about anyone losing their job. Anyone with a family, providing for their family, losing their job. But in our profession we realize whats at stake when we come in. Its pretty simple. Its about wins and losses. In the end it comes down to that and we all realize that.

There will be some good football coaches that will lose their jobs but there will be good football coaches thatll get other jobs too. To make it this far and be leading an NFL franchise, its saying quite a bit about yourself. Thats part of the profession, the business and we know it.

Talking ball

After my weekly visit with central Illinois on WFMB-AM SportsRadio 1450 this afternoon at 4:40, Ill join Kap and Chicago Tribune Live on Comcast SportsNet at 5:30 and then finish off with our regular Monday on-line chat on CSNChicago.com, this week at 7:15 p.m. instead of 7. Looking forward to some football bidness.

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Patrick Mahomes' contract will haunt Bears in 2021

Patrick Mahomes' contract will haunt Bears in 2021

Chicago Bears fans can't escape the nightmare that is Patrick Mahomes. It began in 2018, Mahomes' first season as a full-time starter, when it became obvious that he was a special player who should've been the Bears' pick at No. 2 overall in the 2017 draft. Instead, Ryan Pace chose Mitch Trubisky, who's entering a 2020 training camp battle with Nick Foles for the team's starting job.

Mahomes won the league's MVP award in 2018 and led the Chiefs to a Super Bowl victory last season, and on Monday, he became the richest athlete in American sports. Kansas City signed him to a ridiculous 10-year extension that could pay him over $500 million by the time the deal is done.

Meanwhile, the Bears declined Trubisky's fifth-year option this offseason, making the 2020 campaign potentially his last in Chicago.

But what if Trubisky has a really good year? That should be good news, right? 

Wrong.

And it's all because of Mahomes.

If Trubisky plays like a quality starter in 2020, the Bears will be forced to pay him a lucrative new contract that, if we're being honest, he doesn't deserve. Even if they choose to buy an extra year by using the franchise tag, Mahomes' new deal will jack up the cost of that contract too. Regardless of the strategy, the Bears will be taking a big gamble on a player who needs more than one good year in 2020 to feel confident about paying. 

And let's say Trubisky flops and it's Foles who excels in the Bears' offense. His contract will be directly impacted by Mahomes as well. Remember: The Bears gave Foles the ability to opt-out of the final two years of his deal if he plays well. If Mahomes' big payday happened next year instead of Monday, maybe Chicago could've retained Foles on a more team-friendly contract. That's no longer the case.

So here we are. It's been hard enough trying to recover from the 2017 draft and the what-ifs that followed. It's bad enough that Mahomes has become the NFL's darling and the best quarterback on the planet. But an entirely new layer of the Mahomes curse is coming; he's going to make the Bears pay (again) for passing on him.

Here's what Bears could buy with Patrick Mahomes' new $500 million extension

Here's what Bears could buy with Patrick Mahomes' new $500 million extension

Pat Mahomes made 500 million dollars today. It is an unfathomable amount of money unless you're Patrick Mahomes, who's very seriously fathoming it on whatever fancy yacht he's hopefully on right now. (This, to me, is the only conceivable way to properly celebrate earning the largest contract in major league sports history?) 

And, as far too many Bears fans non-ironically pointed out today, Ryan Pace saved the McCaskeys $500 million today as well. Never hurts to be in the black right?! Just for the sake of this exercise, let's imagine Ryan Pace *wants* to spend $500 million this week. After giving the first 200 to Jimmy Graham (sorry, I'm sorry), where does that leave Pace? Here's what 500 million could get the Bears: 

- Three and a half Khalil Mack contracts, all at once
- 17 Mitch Trubisky contracts, whatever that entails 
- 20 Nick Foles contracts, this exercise is a huge bummer 
- 5 more renovations of Halas Hall, there can never be enough sand pits 
- The Athletic, I can already see the Why I'm Joining headline now
- His own NHL team
69 million Soldier Field hot dogs 
- 4 months rent in Gold Coast 
- 5% of all $2 bills currently in circulation
- 6% of the team that employs him 

Want to guess what, as of Monday afternoon, $500 million can't buy him?!