Bears

Lovie firing: A decision made for obvious reasons

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Lovie firing: A decision made for obvious reasons

Lovie Smith went into the 2012 season in need of a rebound from the franchise disappointment of 2011 that saw a 7-3 start crumble into an 8-8 year. What he and the Bears got was an even more catastrophic collapse, from 7-1 and the No. 2 spot in a playoff lineup to out of the playoffs at 10-6.The result was the end to a nine-year run that included only one trip to a Super Bowl, another to an NFC Championship game and one other to the playoffs and only one year with fewer than seven wins.
RELATED: Smith firing -- A downward spiraling timeline
But evaluations by organizations are based less on the past than on perceptions of where the future is leading. Several reasons lay at the root of the Bears decision to close the Lovie Smith epoch and go in the proverbial another direction:Simple need for change of directionGeorge McCaskey succeeded brother Michael as chairman of the board prior to the 2011 season. The transition was seamless, orderly and in the natural organizational order. Michael had held the job since the death of his father Ed and he was ready to cede the office while remaining on the board of directors.The course of the 2011 season was such that Jerry Angelo was fired after the collapse from 7-3 to 8-8. Ted Phillips remained as president but the organization was clearly not satisfied with what had occurred on the field. Key in the decision was the conclusion that the Bears were losing ground rather than gaining on the Green Bay Packers and (at the time) Detroit Lions.The season-turning injuries to Jay Cutler and Matt Forte factored into Smith keeping his job, and the blame was assigned to Angelo for failing to sufficiently shore up the roster.
RELATED: Cutler "sorry" he couldn't help Smith more
Fast forward to 2012 and another two inept performances against Green Bay and one against the Minnesota Vikings, the new upstarts in the NFC.

Failures on offenseSince Mike Ditka left after 1992, the Bears have had three consecutive coaches from defensive backgrounds: Dave Wannstedt, defensive coordinator in Dallas; Dick Jauron, Jacksonville defensive coordinator, and Smith, coordinator of the St. Louis defense.Smith has been by far the most successful. But even for him the result has been just one losing trip to a Super Bowl, one other to a loss (to Green Bay) in the 2010 NFC Championship game, and a first-round loss in the 2005 divisional round.The biggest single reason was Smiths problems finding an offensive coordinator, or at least recently one who could co-exist with Cutler. The offense never ranked higher than 15th in yardage in Smiths tenure.More to the immediate situation, the offense got worse despite the efforts of Phil Emery to supply the wide-receiver firepower that Jay Cutler supposedly needed. Emery mortgaged a piece of the future by giving up two third-round picks for Brandon Marshall and used a second-rounder in 2012 for Alshon Jeffery.Yet the offense degenerated into the Cutler-Marshall show and closed out of town.The revolving college of coordinators on offense accelerated with the 1009 arrival of Cutler -- Ron Turner out after 2009, Mike Martz after 2011, Mike Tice one-and-done in 2012. The franchises commitment to Cutler remains to be seen this offseason but in a league that tilts toward facilitating offense, the Smith Bears have failed.Big-game failuresSmith achieved a 3-3 record in the postseason. Since the 2006 trip to the Super Bowl he was 1-1, both in the 2010 playoffs.That is a better mark than Mike Ditka in his post-Super Bowl XX time. Ditka was 2-5 with three first-game eliminations and was fired in after a 5-11 meltdown in 1992.But Smiths time is marred by a handful of bad defeats with the playoffs at stake.

RELATED: Only a deep postseason run would have saved Lovie's job

The Bears fell to the Houston Texans (7-8 at the time) in the final game of 2008 when a win would have had them in the playoffs. And while the Minnesota Vikings might still have beaten the Green Bay Packers to squeeze past the Bears into the 2012 playoffs, Smiths team failed to beat a doormat in the Detroit Lions (4-11) when it mattered.The Detroit game mattered because the Bears defense, Smiths signature unit, failed to halt two long touchdown drives to lose the Seattle game. That was followed by losses at Minnesota and to Green Bay at home when either would have allowed the Bears to keep control of their own playoff future.

Postcards from Camp: Defense predictably ahead of offense but “D” already being challenged by changing “O"

Postcards from Camp: Defense predictably ahead of offense but “D” already being challenged by changing “O"

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – An open postcard from the Bears “D”:
 
Yes, we know we need more interceptions. And we’re doing something about it, even if Mitch doesn’t like it – quarterbacks never do. Tru’ probably wasn’t in a great mood after Nick Kwiatkoski picked his way through traffic, then deflected and grabbed a pass of Mitch’s for one pick, this after Kyle (Fuller) had snagged one of 10’s in 7-on-7. So after Cre’Von LeBlanc broke in front of Adam Shaheen to intercept one of Chase Daniel’s throws, Mitch and Prince (Amukamara) did a little jawing. But hey….
 
Kwit is having a great camp, running the offense with Danny Trevathan nursing a hamstring problem and Roquan Smith still not signed. Coach Nagy has told us, and said it again on Sunday, that you have to win your job, no gimmes here, and Kwit isn’t giving anything away.
 
We all were kind of causing problems for the offense. Prince broke up a Mitch throw to Kevin White and then defensed another two snaps later against Josh Bellamy. Kyle broke up a long try to White, too, and even in 7-on7, the QB’s were having to hold onto the ball longer because of good coverage.
 
(Kevin had a spotty day. He burned us with a long TD catch against double coverage but also dropped another Mitch Trubisky deep heave with no one closer than five yards away, and had the football come out when he hit the ground after another catch.)
 
We even created a “problem” for coach Nagy, who’s an offensive guy, an ex-QB himself and a former O-coordinator, but now has to pretend be at least a little happy when we do something on defense. Like he said Sunday, ‘The biggest difference [as a head coach] is you can't veer too much, either way. You're right down the middle. So, if Mitch throws an interception, it's good for our defense. Right? It's not good for Mitch. So, how do you balance that?”
 
Really, we should be ahead of the offense. Two reasons: First, the offense is still learning its playbook and a lot of new guys; and second, as Eddie [Jackson] was saying, “I just know that we’ve got better chemistry from having players here last year. It’s like the biggest thing that you can see. But the offense is doing a great job. They come out there and give us good looks.”
 
The pads were on for Sunday’s practice, so there was more hitting. The offense’ll be catching up more and more, so we’ll just enjoy the edge while it lasts.
 
Sincerely,
 
The “D”
 
P.S.  High-fives to all you fans who came down to watch practice and stayed through all that rain. We’re getting paid to be out there but you’re there because you’re Bears fans. Thanks

 
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Let’s make if official
 
Play during practice Sunday was sloppy at times, understandable given the repeated downpours as well as the inevitable early-camp learning curves.
 
But the practice was run using NFL officials, making their annual camp visits to review and explain new rules, and the Bears committed too many penalties to leave coaches satisfied.
 
Rookie wide receiver Anthony Miller was flagged for offensive pass interference on an early 7-on-7 rep and a handful of other Bears brought out the yellow laundry from the officials. One defensive offsides, a couple of false starts and other interference penalties—all part of those things to be “cleaned up” before the flags start to count.
 
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A-Rob impact—and workload—growing
 
The No. 1 question of anyone who’s been watching training camp is “How’s Trubisky look?” Not far behind that, though, is “What about Robinson? His knee ok?”
 
If early camp performances, including Sunday’s in full pads, are any indicator, and a handful of practices aren’t ever definitive, then the answers on the hoped-for franchise wideout are clear positives. The top free-agent signing of the Bears this offseason has turned in repeated strong plays and has been targeted enough in the course of Trubisky’s progressions to be satisfied at his ability to get open and to earn his quarterback’s confidence.
 
Robinson turned in a difficult sliding catch on Sunday and was denied a deep catch later only by an outstanding pass breakup by safety Adrian Amos. Robinson is coming off season-ending knee surgery of a year ago and likely has a handful of rest days built into his plan, as the Bears are doing with guard Kyle Long. 
 
“We want to be able to monitor and make sure we don’t overdo anything,”said coach Matt Nagy. “There’s no need to do that. He’s worked really hard to get to this point so for us, just to keep an idea where he’s at, how many reps he’s getting, and coach [Mike] Furrey’s done a good job of that.”
 
 
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Fan favorite…sort of
 
This writer was departing O’Hare some weeks back and at an adjacent gate was Bears running back Tarik Cohen. Just time to exchange a few pleasantries and I was leaving. But the notable part of the moment was that no one – no…one —recognized Cohen. No. one.
 
Then came Saturday morning and the first day of fans attending a training-camp practice. The biggest ovation went to quarterback Mitch Trubisky. Not far short of that, however, was the welcome for Cohen, a hint that the second-year ultra-back (with apologies to Raymont Harris, the original Ultraback) won’t go unnoticed at too many more O’Hare gates.
 
“A couple people knew me in the airport,” Cohen said. “I was just keeping my head down, keeping it moving. Airports are congested places.”
 
An ovation coming out to practice “feels great,” Cohen said. “It’s like seeing your hard work pay off a little bit. But I’m looking for a bigger ovation coming out for the games.”
 
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Sick bay
 
Rookie linebacker linebacker Joel Iyiegbuniwe was added to a defense-heavy list of injured absentees, out with what coach Matt Nagy reported was a shoulder injury. He joins linebackers Aaron Lynch and Danny Trevathan and cornerback Sherrick McManis, all with hamstring strains.
 
Tight end Daniel Brown is still out with an ankle injury.
 

Training Camp Daily: Defense still “picking” on Bears QB’s in rainy practices

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USA TODAY

Training Camp Daily: Defense still “picking” on Bears QB’s in rainy practices

Training Camp Daily: The Bears put the pads on for Sunday's practice on another wet day in Bourbonnais. Bears insider John 'Moon' Mullin & producer Paul Aspan discuss Mitchell Trubisky's accuracy, which continues to be a work in progress. Plus Anthony Miller & Kevin White turn heads, while Aaron Lynch suffers yet another injury setback when the Bears are already thin at pass rusher. 

Listen to the full episode here or via the embedded player below: